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21 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

Tomorrow (Sunday 9th May 2021) there is a commemoration ceremony at Moord Piltown – because a hundred years ago James Mary Quain, a volunteer from Youghal, was shot there. Eddie Paul Lynch (South Abbey, Youghal) came out of the bushes with his hands up – but James was further into the furze and was shot.

Account of the events below and thanks to historian and author Mike Hackett for the information.

James Mary Quain
The following short story is taken from an account of the West-Waterford Flying Column as given by Michael Shalloe of Dungarvan in 1955. It tells of the happenings at Moord Cross (of five roads) Piltown in May of 1921 that led to the shooting dead of a nineteen year old Volunteer from Youghal.

Michael says – “It was May 1921 – when I was in the Piltown (near Youghal) district. The Piltown Volunteers had been raiding the mails pretty frequently – and it so happened when I was there with the column – the British Marines in Ardmore started round-up operations. I was with another man of the column – at Monatrea near the Ferrypoint – across from Youghal – and about two miles from Piltown when news of the round-up reached us. We moved inland towards Piltown to try and contact some of our boys – and we were going down a road when a woman ran out of a house to warn us to turn back because the Marines had passed that way a short time previously.

We got into the fields on our way – and then quite close to us – firing broke out which was heavy enough to indicate that a large party of men was engaged in it. We took cover behind a fence and awaited developments. Gradually the firing seemed to move away from where we lay and after about an hour – it died out.
Shortly afterwards – we learned that a party of five or six of our lads had run into a force of British Marines – ten times more numerous than our six – and the engagement we had heard was the outcome. One of our lads named James Mary Quain was killed in that fight. I do not know what the British Marines casualties were.”

Written by Michael Shalloe of Garvan Tce. Dungarvan for the Bureau of Military History re Volunteer action during 1913 – 23.
It seems that James and his comrades were surprised by Marines that had landed by boat at the Ferrypoint and so approached from an unexpected direction – instead of from Ardmore. The Volunteers dumped their bikes and were crossing a field beside the road – through furze bushes when the call rang out “Come out with your hands up”. Eddie Paul Lynch came out of the bushes with his hands up – while James was hidden further in and was shot dead. His body was brought into Veale’s house at Moord before it was brought on a horse and dray to the ferryboat to go home to 12 South Main Street.

During the subsequent wake – a British sentry was stationed on the street outside the house. Feelings in the local population were running very high at the death of the nineteen-year-old – so much that a nearby butcher rushed out of his shop brandishing a cleaver and went to attack the Marine. But for the intervention of some neighbours in stopping and holding him – the butcher would have been shot. And to further anger the locals – the British army band then played on the street.

James was a draughtsman with Fords in Cork and had a promising life ahead of him. He had plans made to go to America and on the day of his funeral – the money arrived from the U.S.A. for his fare.

A brother of his was Brendan – who had a fish shop for many years below the Clock Gate at South Main Street – another brother Charlie had a fish exporting business in Cork City – while a sister Moll married Michael Roche who was a local carpenter and they lived across the road from the Youghal Golf Club.

Sunday May the 9th – is the centenary of the sad event and a tidy ceremony will take place at the memorial at Piltown at 6 pm.

Pictures: The Republican Plot at North Abbey, cemetery, Youghal, County Cork, where James Quain is buried along with other volunteers and the five cross roads near Piltown in County Waterford where James was killed and the memorial at Piltown to the volunteers killed.
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Tomorrow (Sunday 9th May 2021) there is a commemoration ceremony  at Moord Piltown  - because a hundred years ago James Mary Quain, a volunteer from Youghal, was shot there.  Eddie Paul Lynch (South Abbey, Youghal) came out of the bushes with his hands up - but James was further into the furze and was shot.

Account of the events below and thanks to historian and author Mike Hackett for the information.

James Mary Quain 
The following short story is taken from an account of the West-Waterford Flying Column as given by Michael Shalloe of Dungarvan in 1955.  It tells of the happenings at Moord Cross (of five roads) Piltown in May of 1921 that led to the shooting dead of a nineteen year old Volunteer from Youghal.  

Michael says - “It was May 1921 – when I was in the Piltown (near Youghal) district.  The Piltown Volunteers had been raiding the mails pretty frequently – and it so happened when I was there with the column – the British Marines in Ardmore started round-up operations.  I was with another man of the column – at Monatrea near the Ferrypoint – across from Youghal – and about two miles from Piltown when news of the round-up reached us.  We moved inland towards Piltown to try and contact some of our boys – and we were going down a road when a woman ran out of a house to warn us to turn back because the Marines had passed that way a short time previously. 

We got into the fields on our way – and then quite close to us – firing broke out which was heavy enough to indicate that a large party of men was engaged in it.  We took cover behind a fence and awaited developments.  Gradually the firing seemed to move away from where we lay and after about an hour – it died out.  
Shortly afterwards – we learned that a party of five or six of our lads had run into a force of British Marines – ten times more numerous than our six – and the engagement we had heard was the outcome.  One of our lads named James Mary Quain was killed in that fight.  I do not know what the British Marines casualties were.”  

Written by Michael Shalloe of Garvan Tce. Dungarvan for the Bureau of Military History re Volunteer action during 1913 – 23.  
It seems that James and his comrades were surprised by Marines that had landed by boat at the Ferrypoint and so approached from an unexpected direction – instead of from Ardmore.  The Volunteers dumped their bikes and were crossing a field beside the road – through furze bushes when the call rang out “Come out with your hands up”.  Eddie Paul Lynch came out of the bushes with his hands up – while James was hidden further in and was shot dead.  His body was brought into Veale’s house at Moord before it was brought on a horse and dray to the ferryboat to go home to 12 South Main Street.

During the subsequent wake – a British sentry was stationed on the street outside the house.  Feelings in the local population were running very high at the death of the nineteen-year-old – so much that a nearby butcher rushed out of his shop brandishing a cleaver and went to attack the Marine.  But for the intervention of some neighbours in stopping and holding him – the butcher would have been shot.  And to further anger the locals – the British army band then played on the street.

James was a draughtsman with Fords in Cork and had a promising life ahead of him.  He had plans made to go to America and on the day of his funeral – the money arrived from the U.S.A. for his fare.  

A brother of his was Brendan – who had a fish shop for many years below the Clock Gate at South Main Street – another brother Charlie had a fish exporting business in Cork City – while a sister Moll married Michael Roche who was a local carpenter and they lived across the road from the Youghal Golf Club.   

Sunday May the 9th - is the centenary of the sad event and a tidy ceremony will take place at the memorial at Piltown at 6 pm.

Pictures: The Republican Plot at North Abbey, cemetery, Youghal, County Cork, where James Quain is buried along with other volunteers and the five cross roads near Piltown in County Waterford where James was killed and the memorial at Piltown to the volunteers killed.

Comment on Facebook

Patsy Gray Here’s a version of it. Think they mean Mary, not Moll though x

Very very Interesting.

1 week ago

YoughalOnline.com

May Sunday Art Trail: May 1-9th in Glenbower Wood, Killeagh
Covid restrictions inspire a fresh approach to a traditional festival.
Killeagh’s May Sunday Festival began nearly 200 years ago, but in 2021 it will be celebrated like never before. Despite the challenges imposed by a pandemic, the May Sunday Festival is determined to celebrate Killeagh’s creativity, history and ecology. Local non-profit Greywood Arts has returned the festival to its roots in Glenbower Wood this year, where they are orchestrating an art trail showcasing artists from Cork and works made by community groups. This outdoor celebration of place can be experienced at a safe social distance by visitors to the wood May 1-9th.
There will be opportunities for the community to get involved in the art-making through online workshops and tutorials. Villagers are invited to mine their recycling bins for materials to make chimes and garlands to contribute to artist Aoife Banville’s Folly Project. A willow lantern making workshop with Caoimhe Dunn will yield luminous creations that nod to the traditional torch light procession. Families can make their own make their own May Bushes in the virtual company of others, guided by artist Lisa Cliffe. And on Thursday April 28th, a workshop marking Poetry Day Ireland will lead to the creation of a “poem-tree” in the wood.
Themes emerging in the 10 installations range from playfully distorting the viewer’s perception, to raising awareness of waste generation, to the juxtaposition of domestic or man-made objects with the natural environment. While these main works will be installed for nine days, a pop-up exhibition of two-dimensional work by local artists will take place on May Sunday (May 2nd), along with a promenade performance (at a distance) by Tom Campbell and Noelle O’Reagan – a duo most notably seen on Britain’s Got Talent. On Sunday May 9th, the festival comes to a close with a litter-pick organised by Glenbower Wood and Lake.
The 6th class students at St. Fergal’s NS are working with Aoife Banville to create two follies from recycled materials – turning waste into beautiful works of art. The Monday Club active retired group have been invited to get in on the fun, and the tutorial is available on the festival website: MaySunday.ie for anyone who would like to take part.
The artists creating installations are: Aoife Banville (Shanagarry), Sarah Buckley (Mallow), Natasha Burke (Cork), Martha Cashman (Youghal/Cork), Jaki Coffey (Castlemartyr), Richard Forrest (Youghal), Rob Ireson (Whitegate), Danny McCarthy (Midleton), and Rob Monaghan (Cork).
Greywood Art’s artistic director Jessica Bonenfant says “We hope the art trail will offer a bright spot on the horizon after a difficult year. We’re eager to engage with art in physical spaces and feel a cultural event like this has an invaluable impact for our community.”
The first Sunday in May has been Killeagh’s festival day since the de Capell Brooke family opened their estate to the villagers for music and dancing in the 1830s. This date is very likely linked to traditional Bealtaine or May Day celebrations. Glenbower, the ancient native woodland that was private for centuries, is now partially owned by the community and managed by the voluntary Glenbower Wood & Lake committee.
The Art Trail is presented by Greywood Arts with support from Glenbower Wood & Lake Ltd. and Cork County Council.
MaySunday.ie Contact: Jessica Bonenfant 083 845 1750, create@greywoodarts.org
More Info:
greywoodarts.org/may-sunday/
crossingthedissour.ie/wp/
www.facebook.com/greywoodartsireland See Less

MORE INFO:
glenbower.com/

www.facebook.com/YoughalOnline/photos/pcb.4056340887752332/4056335511086203/

www.facebook.com/YoughalOnline/photos/pcb.4056340887752332/4056335607752860
See MoreSee Less

May Sunday Art Trail: May 1-9th in Glenbower Wood, Killeagh
Covid restrictions inspire a fresh approach to a traditional festival.
Killeagh’s May Sunday Festival began nearly 200 years ago, but in 2021 it will be celebrated like never before. Despite the challenges imposed by a pandemic, the May Sunday Festival is determined to celebrate Killeagh’s creativity, history and ecology. Local non-profit Greywood Arts has returned the festival to its roots in Glenbower Wood this year, where they are orchestrating an art trail showcasing artists from Cork and works made by community groups. This outdoor celebration of place can be experienced at a safe social distance by visitors to the wood May 1-9th.
There will be opportunities for the community to get involved in the art-making through online workshops and tutorials. Villagers are invited to mine their recycling bins for materials to make chimes and garlands to contribute to artist Aoife Banville’s Folly Project. A willow lantern making workshop with Caoimhe Dunn will yield luminous creations that nod to the traditional torch light procession. Families can make their own make their own May Bushes in the virtual company of others, guided by artist Lisa Cliffe. And on Thursday April 28th, a workshop marking Poetry Day Ireland will lead to the creation of a “poem-tree” in the wood.
Themes emerging in the 10 installations range from playfully distorting the viewer’s perception, to raising awareness of waste generation, to the juxtaposition of domestic or man-made objects with the natural environment. While these main works will be installed for nine days, a pop-up exhibition of two-dimensional work by local artists will take place on May Sunday (May 2nd), along with a promenade performance (at a distance) by Tom Campbell and Noelle O’Reagan – a duo most notably seen on Britain’s Got Talent. On Sunday May 9th, the festival comes to a close with a litter-pick organised by Glenbower Wood and Lake.
The 6th class students at St. Fergal’s NS are working with Aoife Banville to create two follies from recycled materials – turning waste into beautiful works of art. The Monday Club active retired group have been invited to get in on the fun, and the tutorial is available on the festival website: MaySunday.ie for anyone who would like to take part.
The artists creating installations are: Aoife Banville (Shanagarry), Sarah Buckley (Mallow), Natasha Burke (Cork), Martha Cashman (Youghal/Cork), Jaki Coffey (Castlemartyr), Richard Forrest (Youghal), Rob Ireson (Whitegate), Danny McCarthy (Midleton), and Rob Monaghan (Cork).
Greywood Art’s artistic director Jessica Bonenfant says “We hope the art trail will offer a bright spot on the horizon after a difficult year. We’re eager to engage with art in physical spaces and feel a cultural event like this has an invaluable impact for our community.”
The first Sunday in May has been Killeagh’s festival day since the de Capell Brooke family opened their estate to the villagers for music and dancing in the 1830s. This date is very likely linked to traditional Bealtaine or May Day celebrations. Glenbower, the ancient native woodland that was private for centuries, is now partially owned by the community and managed by the voluntary Glenbower Wood & Lake committee.
The Art Trail is presented by Greywood Arts with support from Glenbower Wood & Lake Ltd. and Cork County Council.
MaySunday.ie Contact: Jessica Bonenfant 083 845 1750, create@greywoodarts.org
More Info:
https://greywoodarts.org/may-sunday/
http://crossingthedissour.ie/wp/
https://www.facebook.com/greywoodartsireland See Less

MORE INFO:
http://glenbower.com/

https://www.facebook.com/YoughalOnline/photos/pcb.4056340887752332/4056335511086203/

https://www.facebook.com/YoughalOnline/photos/pcb.4056340887752332/4056335607752860

Comment on Facebook

Remember this with fond memories while I worked in the Thatch pub.

Tracey Kennedy

1 week ago

YoughalOnline.com

The unusual and colourful sight of a tree branch growing out of a shopfront adds a bit of much needed greenery to North Main street, Youghal, on a beautiful May day. Humans prevail but mother nature always wins. Photo by Marialucia Moynihan See MoreSee Less

The unusual and colourful sight of a tree branch growing out of a shopfront adds a bit of much needed greenery to North Main street, Youghal, on a beautiful May day. Humans prevail but mother nature always wins. Photo by Marialucia Moynihan

Comment on Facebook

Great memories 👍

So badly wishing to visit Youghal once again.

1 week ago

YoughalOnline.com

May Altar -The beautifully decorated May altar to honour the Blessed Virgin Mary on display in the front window of the Muintir Mhuire charity shop on North Main Street, Youghal.

During the month of May – the month of Mary – it is the tradition to honour the Virgin Mary as "The Queen of May"

The yearly tradition also welcomes the Summer. A special table is laid with a cloth, on which is arranged a statue of the Virgin Mary and several vases of wildflowers. The altar is put up on the first of May and it stays there till the end of the month.

Do you remember the annual decorating of the May Altar with flowers on the 1st May. Please leave your comments below.

Picture shows the May Altar and the Statue of Our Lady of Graces – Youghal.
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May Altar -The beautifully decorated May altar to honour the Blessed Virgin Mary on display in the front window of the Muintir Mhuire charity shop on North Main Street, Youghal.

During the month of May - the month of Mary - it is the tradition to honour the Virgin Mary as The Queen of May

The yearly tradition also welcomes the Summer. A special table is laid with a cloth, on which is arranged a statue of the Virgin Mary and several vases of wildflowers. The altar is put up on the first of May and it stays there till the end of the month.

Do you remember the annual decorating of the May Altar with flowers on the 1st May. Please leave your comments below.

Picture shows the May Altar and the Statue of Our Lady of Graces - Youghal.

Comment on Facebook

Stunningly beautiful Queen Mary 🙏👸

We used to do it in primary school , I remember picking flowers for it .

Yes it's lovely We used to have one in primary school we all brought in lot's of flowers bluebells mostly.

Beautiful 🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼

Beautiful

Beautiful💕❤

Beautiful….

Beautiful.

Lovely.

🙏🙏🙏

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Via Cumann Na Daoine

Comment on Facebook

Well done!

Well done ! 😍

That's lovely….💕

1 week ago

YoughalOnline.com

Incredible footage of a paraglider flying over the Redbarn Blue Flag Beach and the new boardwalk in Youghal, County Cork by Piotr Kedzierski.
www.facebook.com/DronoGraphyByPK
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Comment on Facebook

Diane the boardwalk is out as far as the hotel now!

What memories.

The best

Cool editing and soundtrack

Fantastic

Christine Riordan

Class 👍🏻

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1 week ago

YoughalOnline.com

THEN AND NOW: Russell’s Shop – 38 South Main Street (1954)
Youghal – County Cork.

The photo on the left was taken back in 1954 during the filming of ‘Moby Dick’ as you can see by the two gentlemen dressed in seafaring costume coming out of the sweet and cigarette shop on South Main St., Youghal. What a great image from back in the day as the photographer shouted ‘Watch the birdie’.

The photo on the right is the same present day location with the wooden ESB pole for public street lighting. Somethings never change.
(Photo possibly from the Owens collection)
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THEN AND NOW: Russell’s Shop - 38 South Main Street (1954)
Youghal - County Cork.

The photo on the left was taken back in 1954 during the filming of Moby Dick as you can see by the two gentlemen dressed in seafaring costume coming out of the sweet and cigarette shop on South Main St., Youghal. What a great image from back in the day as the photographer shouted Watch the birdie.

The photo on the right is the same present day location with the wooden ESB pole for public street lighting. Somethings never change.
(Photo possibly from the Owens collection)

Comment on Facebook

Elaine McGrath

Brilliant Photo. I dont remember that particular shop,but I do remember lots of other little sweet shops dotted around the Town. This was before the onset of Supermarkets. Great for the Consumer but sounded the death knell of many of these little shops and their owners and unfortunately never to be seen again.

Much better looking in 1954!!

2 weeks ago

YoughalOnline.com

May Sunday Art Trail: May 1-9th in Glenbower Wood, Killeagh
Covid restrictions inspire a fresh approach to a traditional festival.
Killeagh’s May Sunday Festival began nearly 200 years ago, but in 2021 it will be celebrated like never before. Despite the challenges imposed by a pandemic, the May Sunday Festival is determined to celebrate Killeagh’s creativity, history and ecology. Local non-profit Greywood Arts has returned the festival to its roots in Glenbower Wood this year, where they are orchestrating an art trail showcasing artists from Cork and works made by community groups. This outdoor celebration of place can be experienced at a safe social distance by visitors to the wood May 1-9th.
There will be opportunities for the community to get involved in the art-making through online workshops and tutorials. Villagers are invited to mine their recycling bins for materials to make chimes and garlands to contribute to artist Aoife Banville’s Folly Project. A willow lantern making workshop with Caoimhe Dunn will yield luminous creations that nod to the traditional torch light procession. Families can make their own make their own May Bushes in the virtual company of others, guided by artist Lisa Cliffe. And on Thursday April 28th, a workshop marking Poetry Day Ireland will lead to the creation of a “poem-tree” in the wood.
Themes emerging in the 10 installations range from playfully distorting the viewer’s perception, to raising awareness of waste generation, to the juxtaposition of domestic or man-made objects with the natural environment. While these main works will be installed for nine days, a pop-up exhibition of two-dimensional work by local artists will take place on May Sunday (May 2nd), along with a promenade performance (at a distance) by Tom Campbell and Noelle O’Reagan – a duo most notably seen on Britain’s Got Talent. On Sunday May 9th, the festival comes to a close with a litter-pick organised by Glenbower Wood and Lake.
The 6th class students at St. Fergal’s NS are working with Aoife Banville to create two follies from recycled materials – turning waste into beautiful works of art. The Monday Club active retired group have been invited to get in on the fun, and the tutorial is available on the festival website: MaySunday.ie for anyone who would like to take part.
The artists creating installations are: Aoife Banville (Shanagarry), Sarah Buckley (Mallow), Natasha Burke (Cork), Martha Cashman (Youghal/Cork), Jaki Coffey (Castlemartyr), Richard Forrest (Youghal), Rob Ireson (Whitegate), Danny McCarthy (Midleton), and Rob Monaghan (Cork).
Greywood Art’s artistic director Jessica Bonenfant says “We hope the art trail will offer a bright spot on the horizon after a difficult year. We’re eager to engage with art in physical spaces and feel a cultural event like this has an invaluable impact for our community.”
The first Sunday in May has been Killeagh’s festival day since the de Capell Brooke family opened their estate to the villagers for music and dancing in the 1830s. This date is very likely linked to traditional Bealtaine or May Day celebrations. Glenbower, the ancient native woodland that was private for centuries, is now partially owned by the community and managed by the voluntary Glenbower Wood & Lake committee.
The Art Trail is presented by Greywood Arts with support from Glenbower Wood & Lake Ltd. and Cork County Council.
MaySunday.ie Contact: Jessica Bonenfant 083 845 1750, create@greywoodarts.org
More Info:
greywoodarts.org/may-sunday/
crossingthedissour.ie/wp/
www.facebook.com/greywoodartsireland
See MoreSee Less

May Sunday Art Trail: May 1-9th in Glenbower Wood, Killeagh
Covid restrictions inspire a fresh approach to a traditional festival. 
Killeagh’s May Sunday Festival began nearly 200 years ago, but in 2021 it will be celebrated like never before. Despite the challenges imposed by a pandemic, the May Sunday Festival is determined to celebrate Killeagh’s creativity, history and ecology. Local non-profit Greywood Arts has returned the festival to its roots in Glenbower Wood this year, where they are orchestrating an art trail showcasing artists from Cork and works made by community groups. This outdoor celebration of place can be experienced at a safe social distance by visitors to the wood May 1-9th. 
There will be opportunities for the community to get involved in the art-making through online workshops and tutorials. Villagers are invited to mine their recycling bins for materials to make chimes and garlands to contribute to artist Aoife Banville’s Folly Project. A willow lantern making workshop with Caoimhe Dunn will yield luminous creations that nod to the traditional torch light procession. Families can make their own make their own May Bushes in the virtual company of others, guided by artist Lisa Cliffe. And on Thursday April 28th, a workshop marking Poetry Day Ireland will lead to the creation of a “poem-tree” in the wood.
Themes emerging in the 10 installations range from playfully distorting the viewer’s perception, to raising awareness of waste generation, to the juxtaposition of domestic or man-made objects with the natural environment. While these main works will be installed for nine days, a pop-up exhibition of two-dimensional work by local artists will take place on May Sunday (May 2nd), along with a promenade performance (at a distance) by Tom Campbell and Noelle O’Reagan – a duo most notably seen on Britain’s Got Talent. On Sunday May 9th, the festival comes to a close with a litter-pick organised by Glenbower Wood and Lake.  
The 6th class students at St. Fergal’s NS are working with Aoife Banville to create two follies from recycled materials – turning waste into beautiful works of art. The Monday Club active retired group have been invited to get in on the fun, and the tutorial is available on the festival website: MaySunday.ie for anyone who would like to take part.
The artists creating installations are: Aoife Banville (Shanagarry), Sarah Buckley (Mallow), Natasha Burke (Cork), Martha Cashman (Youghal/Cork), Jaki Coffey (Castlemartyr), Richard Forrest (Youghal), Rob Ireson (Whitegate), Danny McCarthy (Midleton), and Rob Monaghan (Cork). 
Greywood Art’s artistic director Jessica Bonenfant says “We hope the art trail will offer a bright spot on the horizon after a difficult year. We’re eager to engage with art in physical spaces and feel a cultural event like this has an invaluable impact for our community.”  
The first Sunday in May has been Killeagh’s festival day since the de Capell Brooke family opened their estate to the villagers for music and dancing in the 1830s. This date is very likely linked to traditional Bealtaine or May Day celebrations. Glenbower, the ancient native woodland that was private for centuries, is now partially owned by the community and managed by the voluntary Glenbower Wood & Lake committee. 
The Art Trail is presented by Greywood Arts with support from Glenbower Wood & Lake Ltd. and Cork County Council. 
MaySunday.ie Contact: Jessica Bonenfant 083 845 1750, create@greywoodarts.org
More Info:
https://greywoodarts.org/may-sunday/
http://crossingthedissour.ie/wp/
https://www.facebook.com/greywoodartsireland

2 weeks ago

YoughalOnline.com

May Sunday Art Trail: May 1-9th in Glenbower Wood, Killeagh

Covid restrictions inspire a fresh approach to a traditional festival.

Killeagh’s May Sunday Festival began nearly 200 years ago, but in 2021 it will be celebrated like never before. Despite the challenges imposed by a pandemic, the May Sunday Festival is determined to celebrate Killeagh’s creativity, history and ecology. Local non-profit Greywood Arts has returned the festival to its roots in Glenbower Wood this year, where they are orchestrating an art trail showcasing artists from Cork and works made by community groups. This outdoor celebration of place can be experienced at a safe social distance by visitors to the wood May 1-9th.

There will be opportunities for the community to get involved in the art-making through online workshops and tutorials. Villagers are invited to mine their recycling bins for materials to make chimes and garlands to contribute to artist Aoife Banville’s Folly Project. A willow lantern making workshop with Caoimhe Dunn will yield luminous creations that nod to the traditional torch light procession. Families can make their own make their own May Bushes in the virtual company of others, guided by artist Lisa Cliffe. And on Thursday April 28th, a workshop marking Poetry Day Ireland will lead to the creation of a “poem-tree” in the wood.

Themes emerging in the 10 installations range from playfully distorting the viewer’s perception, to raising awareness of waste generation, to the juxtaposition of domestic or man-made objects with the natural environment. While these main works will be installed for nine days, a pop-up exhibition of two-dimensional work by local artists will take place on May Sunday (May 2nd), along with a promenade performance (at a distance) by Tom Campbell and Noelle O’Reagan – a duo most notably seen on Britain’s Got Talent. On Sunday May 9th, the festival comes to a close with a litter-pick organised by Glenbower Wood and Lake.

The 6th class students at St. Fergal’s NS are working with Aoife Banville to create two follies from recycled materials – turning waste into beautiful works of art. The Monday Club active retired group have been invited to get in on the fun, and the tutorial is available on the festival website: MaySunday.ie for anyone who would like to take part.

The artists creating installations are: Aoife Banville (Shanagarry), Sarah Buckley (Mallow), Natasha Burke (Cork), Martha Cashman (Youghal/Cork), Jaki Coffey (Castlemartyr), Richard Forrest (Youghal), Rob Ireson (Whitegate), Danny McCarthy (Midleton), and Rob Monaghan (Cork).

Greywood Art’s artistic director Jessica Bonenfant says “We hope the art trail will offer a bright spot on the horizon after a difficult year. We’re eager to engage with art in physical spaces and feel a cultural event like this has an invaluable impact for our community.”

The first Sunday in May has been Killeagh’s festival day since the de Capell Brooke family opened their estate to the villagers for music and dancing in the 1830s. This date is very likely linked to traditional Bealtaine or May Day celebrations. Glenbower, the ancient native woodland that was private for centuries, is now partially owned by the community and managed by the voluntary Glenbower Wood & Lake committee.

The Art Trail is presented by Greywood Arts with support from Glenbower Wood & Lake Ltd. and Cork County Council.

MaySunday.ie Contact: Jessica Bonenfant 083 845 1750, create@greywoodarts.org

More Info:
greywoodarts.org/may-sunday/

crossingthedissour.ie/wp/

www.facebook.com/greywoodartsireland
See MoreSee Less

May Sunday Art Trail: May 1-9th in Glenbower Wood, Killeagh

Covid restrictions inspire a fresh approach to a traditional festival. 

Killeagh’s May Sunday Festival began nearly 200 years ago, but in 2021 it will be celebrated like never before. Despite the challenges imposed by a pandemic, the May Sunday Festival is determined to celebrate Killeagh’s creativity, history and ecology. Local non-profit Greywood Arts has returned the festival to its roots in Glenbower Wood this year, where they are orchestrating an art trail showcasing artists from Cork and works made by community groups. This outdoor celebration of place can be experienced at a safe social distance by visitors to the wood May 1-9th. 

There will be opportunities for the community to get involved in the art-making through online workshops and tutorials. Villagers are invited to mine their recycling bins for materials to make chimes and garlands to contribute to artist Aoife Banville’s Folly Project. A willow lantern making workshop with Caoimhe Dunn will yield luminous creations that nod to the traditional torch light procession. Families can make their own make their own May Bushes in the virtual company of others, guided by artist Lisa Cliffe. And on Thursday April 28th, a workshop marking Poetry Day Ireland will lead to the creation of a “poem-tree” in the wood.

Themes emerging in the 10 installations range from playfully distorting the viewer’s perception, to raising awareness of waste generation, to the juxtaposition of domestic or man-made objects with the natural environment. While these main works will be installed for nine days, a pop-up exhibition of two-dimensional work by local artists will take place on May Sunday (May 2nd), along with a promenade performance (at a distance) by Tom Campbell and Noelle O’Reagan – a duo most notably seen on Britain’s Got Talent. On Sunday May 9th, the festival comes to a close with a litter-pick organised by Glenbower Wood and Lake.  

The 6th class students at St. Fergal’s NS are working with Aoife Banville to create two follies from recycled materials – turning waste into beautiful works of art. The Monday Club active retired group have been invited to get in on the fun, and the tutorial is available on the festival website: MaySunday.ie for anyone who would like to take part.

The artists creating installations are: Aoife Banville (Shanagarry), Sarah Buckley (Mallow), Natasha Burke (Cork), Martha Cashman (Youghal/Cork), Jaki Coffey (Castlemartyr), Richard Forrest (Youghal), Rob Ireson (Whitegate), Danny McCarthy (Midleton), and Rob Monaghan (Cork). 

Greywood Art’s artistic director Jessica Bonenfant says “We hope the art trail will offer a bright spot on the horizon after a difficult year. We’re eager to engage with art in physical spaces and feel a cultural event like this has an invaluable impact for our community.”  

The first Sunday in May has been Killeagh’s festival day since the de Capell Brooke family opened their estate to the villagers for music and dancing in the 1830s. This date is very likely linked to traditional Bealtaine or May Day celebrations. Glenbower, the ancient native woodland that was private for centuries, is now partially owned by the community and managed by the voluntary Glenbower Wood & Lake committee. 

The Art Trail is presented by Greywood Arts with support from Glenbower Wood & Lake Ltd. and Cork County Council. 

MaySunday.ie Contact: Jessica Bonenfant 083 845 1750, create@greywoodarts.org

More Info:
https://greywoodarts.org/may-sunday/

http://crossingthedissour.ie/wp/

https://www.facebook.com/greywoodartsireland

2 weeks ago

YoughalOnline.com

The famous landmark Moll Goggin’s Corner at the head of the rock in Youghal like you’ve never seen her before. This is an aerial drone shot taken by Piotr Kedzierski DronoGraphy by PK.

The balcony is on a sea rock, overlooking the mouth of Youghal harbour nestling between the lighthouse and the Front Strand.

Traditionally recognised by its black and white chequered exterior, it offers a panoramic view about 30m above high water.

The balcony has existed since time immemorial and local folklore suggests, in past centuries, wives and sweethearts gathered there to wave goodbye or to greet sailors coming and going from Youghal.

Legend has it that Moll Goggin herself once waited forlornly for a love that never returned.
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The famous landmark Moll Goggins Corner at the head of the rock in Youghal like youve never seen her before. This is an aerial drone shot taken by Piotr Kedzierski DronoGraphy by PK.

The balcony is on a sea rock, overlooking the mouth of Youghal harbour nestling between the lighthouse and the Front Strand.

Traditionally recognised by its black and white chequered exterior, it offers a panoramic view about 30m above high water.

The balcony has existed since time immemorial and local folklore suggests, in past centuries, wives and sweethearts gathered there to wave goodbye or to greet sailors coming and going from Youghal.

Legend has it that Moll Goggin herself once waited forlornly for a love that never returned.

Comment on Facebook

Love that little spot. Holds happy childhood memories for me, it was accessible back then!

Wow

2 weeks ago

YoughalOnline.com

Find the Nook – Again. By Mike Hackett

The Nook Bar in Youghal was overflowing with custom in the 1960s and 70s – folks came from as far as Cork City to savour the atmosphere of ‘The Nook’ and of course the owner Joe Treacy and his wife Maureen thrived on it. Maureen was nee Barry from Castlemartyr and her family had a public house in that village – beside the bridge. It was the nearest one to the G.A.A. pitch and after matches – it would be packed.

Joe put a lot of thinking and planning into the progression of his business at The Nook. He went on to purchase a few next-door cottages on the laneway behind his premises and extended into those – and out the back as well. He then formed a band and started to have music – with getting the patrons to sing – and this led on to singing competitions. Another attraction that he ran was to name a hummed tune – and win a reward of a bottle of whiskey. Then if it was won in the first night or two – the winner got a noggin (small) bottle of whiskey – but when it went on without being recognised for a few weeks – then the winner got a big bottle.

A chap named Finbarr O’Sullivan – whose family also had a bar – the Anchor Bar near the quayside – attended The Nook and tried to name the particular tune for that week. He tried on a few occasions – but failed every time. Nobody could recognise it. That tune dragged on week after week without anybody naming it. However – Finbarr had an idea. He listened attentively the next time and immediately ran to the nearby public telephone kiosk – rang Mick Delahunty in Clonmel – and hummed the tune over the phone line. Mick knew it and Finbarr ran back to win and receive his bottle of whiskey.

When we were kids walking down the long main street – a mile to school – we passed The Nook – which was a combined grocery and pub in that era. As we resumed our schooling after the summer holidays – Joe would have a billboard on the pavement that said ‘Only sixteen more weeks to Christmas – join our Christmas Club’. Every subsequent week – the number of course reduced – until we got our holidays with only one week left.

If you wanted to sing a cowboy song with the band in The Nook – then you were given a cowboy hat – or for an Irish song – a tweed cap. If your song had been made famous by a female like Helen Shapero or Bridie Gallagher – you could be given a head scarf to wear. Just imagine the mockery and laugher of your friends as you acted the part.

Joe at one time had a big sign on the road near the lighthouse that said ‘Find the Nook’. This was when thousands of people from Cork City came to Youghal in ten trains every Sunday – and the curious ones came into town to ‘Find the Nook’.


The drift-net fishermen were good supporters of The Nook and this was how Joe encouraged them. He had a row boat to bring his young family out on the river and across to Monatrea in West Waterford. His gimmick this time was to bring empty (glass) stout bottles with him in the boat – with a note in each one that invited the finder to get a free drink in the Nook. The corked bottles would be thrown into the river casually and drift away with the tide. The fishermen on the river would find them and go later to get their free drink. But the word got broadcast and the fishermen would watch Joe as he rowed on the river and their anticipation and knowledge of the currents meant prizes of free drinks for many of them. However – Joe was no soft touch and there was method in his generosity. Having had the free drink – mostly a drop of rum – the fishermen would go on to pay for a few more and stay on awhile. It didn’t take long for the times between fishing the tides to become sessions of tall tales by fishermen, sailors and old tars in the ‘Nook’. Well done Joe!

Local photographer Bob Rock (recently R.I.P.) and his wife Teresa told me a very funny story about how they were having a drink in the Nook one night during the tourist season. Bob had a hearing problem and this – together with the noise from the band – made it difficult for him to hear what his wife Teresa was saying. He moved closer to her until their faces were only six inches apart. After awhile an American woman came over to them and complimented them on being so much in love – looking into each other’s eyes so much all night. Teresa had to explain – that apart from love – Bob had a hearing problem and that he came closer to be able to lip-read what she was saying.

Richard Leo’s father Dick had a welding business at the corner of the Market Quay in 1950 – where the film ‘Moby Dick’ was later made. Very sadly – he developed the dreaded T.B. at thirty-four years of age and had to stop working. He then went to hospital where the medics tried hard to save him. His wife Nellie went to visit him in that Cork Hospital a few times every week. Then when she would return home – Richard and I would be expecting her from the bus – and she was very thoughtful and generous. The famous Woolworths toy shop in Patrick Street was our Mecca – whenever we got a chance of going to the city. Woolworths sold toy soldiers, Dinky cars and cowboy guns. The toy soldiers would be lined in hundreds under the glass counter cases and likewise the Dinky cars. It was paradise to a child. Nellie called there every time to get something to bring home to us. I remember not going home for my tea while waiting for her to arrive off the bus. But then Dick passed away at thirty-six years – leaving his wife Nellie (nee Swayne) and one child – Richard – behind.

On the day that Dick’s funeral was taking place – my mother was detailed to mind Richard with me at Cork Hill – where we lived then. Suddenly that day – for some unexplained reason – Richard went out the front door of our house and ran down the North Main Street as his father’s funeral was approaching. My mother quickly caught up with him and pulled him into Treacy’s grocery shop and bar (The Nook Bar). Mrs. Julia Treacy (Joe’s mother) was just closing the front doors in respect (as was done that time) as the hearse was passing. Richard had not been told about the funeral and was not aware of why the crowd of people were passing outside the glass front doors. My mother explained to Julia who Richard was – and Mrs. Treacy gave him a present of a long bar of Cadbury’s chocolate – which the child ate while the funeral of his father was passing by.

Aris – Buiochas do Richard Leo agus Barry Treacy cun sceal seo a dheanabh.

Thanks to Richard and Barry.

-Mike Hackett

Various pictures attached:
Photo 1 – The Nook Front – carpentry by Andy Kelly
2 – Joe Treacy
3 – The Band – Siddy Daly – Henry Clohessy and John Forrest
4 – Bob Rock with his wife Teresa
5 – Kathleen Koch (poet) with Mike Hackett and Richard Leo at Caliso Bay.
See MoreSee Less

Find the Nook – Again. By Mike Hackett

The Nook Bar in Youghal was overflowing with custom in the 1960s and 70s - folks came from as far as Cork City to savour the atmosphere of ‘The Nook’ and of course the owner Joe Treacy and his wife Maureen thrived on it.  Maureen was nee Barry from Castlemartyr and her family had a public house in that village – beside the bridge.  It was the nearest one to the G.A.A. pitch and after matches – it would be packed.  

Joe put a lot of thinking and planning into the progression of his business at The Nook.  He went on to purchase a few next-door cottages on the laneway behind his premises and extended into those - and out the back as well.  He then formed a band and started to have music - with getting the patrons to sing - and this led on to singing competitions.  Another attraction that he ran was to name a hummed tune - and win a reward of a bottle of whiskey.  Then if it was won in the first night or two - the winner got a noggin (small) bottle of whiskey - but when it went on without being recognised for a few weeks - then the winner got a big bottle.  

A chap named Finbarr O’Sullivan - whose family also had a bar - the Anchor Bar near the quayside - attended The Nook and tried to name the particular tune for that week.  He tried on a few occasions - but failed every time. Nobody could recognise it.  That tune dragged on week after week without anybody naming it.  However - Finbarr had an idea.  He listened attentively the next time and immediately ran to the nearby public telephone kiosk - rang Mick Delahunty in Clonmel - and hummed the tune over the phone line.  Mick knew it and Finbarr ran back to win and receive his bottle of whiskey.  

When we were kids walking down the long main street – a mile to school – we passed The Nook – which was a combined grocery and pub in that era.  As we resumed our schooling after the summer holidays – Joe would have a billboard on the pavement that said ‘Only sixteen more weeks to Christmas – join our Christmas Club’.  Every subsequent week – the number of course reduced – until we got our holidays with only one week left.   

If you wanted to sing a cowboy song with the band in The Nook - then you were given a cowboy hat - or for an Irish song - a tweed cap.  If your song had been made famous by a female like Helen Shapero or Bridie Gallagher - you could be given a head scarf to wear.  Just imagine the mockery and laugher of your friends as you acted the part.  

Joe at one time had a big sign on the road near the lighthouse that said ‘Find the Nook’.  This was when thousands of people from Cork City came to Youghal in ten trains every Sunday - and the curious ones came into town to ‘Find the Nook’.  
 

The drift-net fishermen were good supporters of The Nook and this was how Joe encouraged them.  He had a row boat to bring his young family out on the river and across to Monatrea in West Waterford.  His gimmick this time was to bring empty (glass) stout bottles with him in the boat - with a note in each one that invited the finder to get a free drink in the Nook.  The corked bottles would be thrown into the river casually and drift away with the tide.  The fishermen on the river would find them and go later to get their free drink.  But the word got broadcast and the fishermen would watch Joe as he rowed on the river and their anticipation and knowledge of the currents meant prizes of free drinks for many of them.  However - Joe was no soft touch and there was method in his generosity.  Having had the free drink - mostly a drop of rum - the fishermen would go on to pay for a few more and stay on awhile.  It didn’t take long for the times between fishing the tides to become sessions of tall tales by fishermen, sailors and old tars in the ‘Nook’.  Well done Joe! 

Local photographer Bob Rock (recently R.I.P.) and his wife Teresa told me a very funny story about how they were having a drink in the Nook one night during the tourist season.  Bob had a hearing problem and this – together with the noise from the band – made it difficult for him to hear what his wife Teresa was saying.  He moved closer to her until their faces were only six inches apart.  After awhile an American woman came over to them and complimented them on being so much in love – looking into each other’s eyes so much all night.  Teresa had to explain - that apart from love - Bob had a hearing problem and that he came closer to be able to lip-read what she was saying. 

Richard Leo’s father Dick had a welding business at the corner of the Market Quay in 1950 – where the film ‘Moby Dick’ was later made.  Very sadly – he developed the dreaded T.B. at thirty-four years of age and had to stop working.  He then went to hospital where the medics tried hard to save him.  His wife Nellie went to visit him in that Cork Hospital a few times every week.  Then when she would return home – Richard and I would be expecting her from the bus - and she was very thoughtful and generous.  The famous Woolworths toy shop in Patrick Street was our Mecca – whenever we got a chance of going to the city.  Woolworths sold toy soldiers, Dinky cars and cowboy guns.  The toy soldiers would be lined in hundreds under the glass counter cases and likewise the Dinky cars.  It was paradise to a child.  Nellie called there every time to get something to bring home to us.  I remember not going home for my tea while waiting for her to arrive off the bus.  But then Dick passed away at thirty-six years – leaving his wife Nellie (nee Swayne) and one child - Richard - behind. 

On the day that Dick’s funeral was taking place - my mother was detailed to mind Richard with me at Cork Hill – where we lived then.  Suddenly that day – for some unexplained reason – Richard went out the front door of our house and ran down the North Main Street as his father’s funeral was approaching.  My mother quickly caught up with him and pulled him into Treacy’s grocery shop and bar (The Nook Bar).  Mrs. Julia Treacy (Joe’s mother) was just closing the front doors in respect (as was done that time) as the hearse was passing.  Richard had not been told about the funeral and was not aware of why the crowd of people were passing outside the glass front doors.   My mother explained to Julia who Richard was – and Mrs. Treacy gave him a present of a long bar of Cadbury’s chocolate – which the child ate while the funeral of his father was passing by.    

Aris – Buiochas do Richard Leo agus Barry Treacy cun sceal seo a dheanabh.

Thanks to Richard and Barry. 

-Mike Hackett

Various pictures attached:
Photo 1 – The Nook Front – carpentry by Andy Kelly
2 – Joe Treacy
3 – The Band – Siddy Daly - Henry Clohessy and  John Forrest  
4 – Bob Rock with his wife Teresa
5 – Kathleen Koch (poet) with Mike Hackett and Richard Leo at Caliso Bay.

Comment on Facebook

What a wonderful story of the nook and the comings and goings seems like their was great fun 🎶🎶🎶🎶

Great story thanks Mike remember it all so well

What a lovely read, just love all the history attached to the Nook, have spent many good times there over the years ❤️

Julie Ní T

Deirdre Rock

Deirdre Rock Christine Hennessy the article that was in the fungarvan paper.

Aisling Clohessy-O'Mahony

A few drinks there, on to Red Barn. 🤠

A lovely read. I remember going down to visit the nook with my beautiful dad Donie O’Driscoll from Ballycotton to visit aunt Julia who was dads aunt. I loved going on those visits great memories.

Emma Bailey ……show this to John.

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2 weeks ago

YoughalOnline.com

The 49 Steps, Youghal, Co Cork. Photo by Marialucia Moynihan

The 49 steps is located right between the men’s diving rocks beneath the lighthouse and Moll Goggin’s Corner at the head of the rock. Many local people will remember going down the "The 49 Steps" to the small beach set in amongst the rocks. It was a spectacular place to swim near the mouth of the harbour and under the gaze of the Youghal lighthouse. The beach was mainly used by locals when the strand was overcrowded during the peak summer months of the tourist season.

Green Hole Beach (next to Green Park), The Diving Rocks and The 49 Steps were mainly used by locals. In the old days swimming was not as popular as it is now. This was for many reasons. From the 1950s onwards swimming started to become popular in a rapidly changing Irish society with less strict rules, more open-mindedness and liberal views.

At the very top of the steps there once was a popular shop owned by Tom Donovan. Tourists and locals would buy the colourful buckets and spades to build sandcastles on the beach.

Mr. Donovan had a great saying when you were looking to buy the newspaper, "I can give you todays paper tomorrow, yesterdays paper today but I can’t give you todays paper today"
(Thanks to Margaret Winser for remembering this lovely quote)

This is one of the most photographed places in town. The sun swings around after midday and lights up the whole area to make the lighthouse pop out against the skyline.

Sadly the ’49 steps’ are almost forgotten as there has been no public access to the beach below for many years.

Do you remember the 49 steps and Tom Donovans shop. Is so please leave a comment below and help preserve the towns history.
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The 49 Steps, Youghal, Co Cork. Photo by Marialucia Moynihan 

The 49 steps is located right between the mens diving rocks beneath the lighthouse and Moll Goggins Corner at the head of the rock. Many local people will remember going down the The 49 Steps to the small beach set in amongst the rocks. It was a spectacular place to swim near the mouth of the harbour and under the gaze of the Youghal lighthouse.  The beach was mainly used by locals when the strand was overcrowded during the peak summer months of the tourist season.

Green Hole Beach (next to Green Park), The Diving Rocks and The 49 Steps were mainly used by locals. In the old days swimming was not as popular as it is now. This was for many reasons. From the 1950s onwards swimming started to become popular in a rapidly changing Irish society with less strict rules, more open-mindedness and liberal views.  

At the very top of the steps there once was a popular shop owned by Tom Donovan. Tourists and locals would buy the colourful buckets and spades to build sandcastles on the beach.

Mr. Donovan had a great saying when you were looking to buy the newspaper, I can give you todays paper tomorrow, yesterdays paper today but I cant give you todays paper today
(Thanks to Margaret Winser for remembering this lovely quote)

This is one of the most photographed places in town. The sun swings around after midday and lights up the whole area to make the lighthouse pop out against the skyline.  

Sadly the 49 steps are almost forgotten as there has been no public access to the beach below for many years.

Do you remember the 49 steps and Tom Donovans shop. Is so please leave a comment below and help preserve the towns history.

Comment on Facebook

Any chance I got as a kid that was my go to spot…danger.added to the fun.. great times!!.. MH..Thank you for using my photo.⚓

I remember it well when we wr young and the tide was out we would go out all the rocks from Green Hole to Perks when they wr situated where the Apartments are now and we would always go to Tom Donovans shop great memories.

What a beautiful shot… maybe the most magical part of Youghal?💚

Fab photo!

Remember all of them and the men’s swimming hole. Taboo!

Oh yes, I remember the 49 steps and the shop, and as you say, the lighthouse makes a beautiful picture, wonderful place !

I loved going there and also shopping at Tom Donovan’s

Remember it well

It looks beautiful but I never got to see them .

Beautiful, thank you for sharing! ☘🇨🇮🍀

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