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10 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

Archive photo of Youghal Railway Station 1956:
The first of the mainline diesels began to be delivered in 1955. These were the Co-Co diesel electrics built by Metropolitan Vickers and known on CIE as the A Class. Powered by 1,200hp Crossley engines they were quickly put to work on the services from Dublin to Cork and Limerick. The diesels were turned out in silver-grey livery which was ill-suited to withstand the rigours of the Irish weather. Over 35 years later many of the A-class are still in service on passenger and freight trains throughout the CIE system.

Pictures shows the silver-grey A17 about to depart on the 26th April 1956 from Youghal to Cork and the J9 class No. 252 ready to depart at Kent Station in Cork to Youghal in September 1956.

Picture: The entrance to the Youghal Railway Station and bus transfer. The massive advertising sign on the left is for Beamish Stout, Cork’s own brewery company. The large circular railway turntable is just off to the right of the picture. This is where the train engine would turn back around for the next journey.

Picture: School’s out for summer – Cork school children’s outing to Youghal from Cork railway station in 1931. What a great picture.

Picture: The disused Railway Turntable at the Youghal railway station taken sometime in the early 1980’s approx. This is where the Cork to Youghal train engine would turn around in the direction from where it came from. Around that time it was completely covered over with gravel for health and safety reasons and also to preserve for "down the line". It is still there and should be in good nick if ever it is excavated and brought back to its former glory.

Picture: Three still photos from the 1970’s

According to Cork Examiner reports up to 5,000 passengers came to the beach in Youghal on a fine sunny Sunday in 1954
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Missing a house up on the hill Longville

Is this Kent Stn?

Archive Film 1930:
Myrtle Grove also known as Sir Walter Raleigh’s House in Youghal back in the 1930’s.
The voice is James Anthony FitzPatrick (February 26, 1894 – June 12, 1980) an American producer, director, writer, and narrator, known from the early 1930s as "The Voice of the Globe." from his Fitzpatrick’s Traveltalks.

History:
Myrtle Grove is an Elizabethan gabled house in Youghal, County Cork, Ireland. The house is notable as a rare example in Ireland of a 16th-century unfortified house. It is situated in a secluded spot, close to the Collegiate Church of St Mary Youghal.
It was home for Sir Walter Raleigh in 1588-1589. Myrtle Grove’s South Gable is where Edmund Spenser is reputed to have written part of his poem The Faerie Queene. The house was acquired in 1602 from Sir Walter Raleigh’s Irish estate by Richard Boyle, who later became Earl of Cork. Though remodeled twice it is still the best Tudor house in Ireland. The house was acquired by Hayman family in the 18th century.

In the 20th century, it was the home of Sir Henry Arthur Blake and Lady Blake. The house remains in private ownership.

The house is reputed to be where potatoes were first planted in Europe. This is however, unlikely as potatoes were in present in Spain in 1536. There is a similar legend stating that Myrtle Grove was where tobacco was first smoked by Walter Raleigh. A servant was said to have observed Raleigh from behind and seen smoke rising from him. Thinking that Raleigh was on fire he threw a bucket of water on him to douse the fire. This is unlikely to have occurred in Myrtle Grove as the legend is also associated with several of Raleigh’s houses.
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I’ve been up there so many times I love it all such an amazing History going back nw as far as Druids ,it takes my breath away ♥️

Incredible views of The Red House, Youghal, Co. Cork. It is for sale for a few bob or two.
youtu.be/jKh4Cx8APA8
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Zoe Baeza Serrano

I would be great if the state bought it and opened it up to the public for tours. Would add greatly to the town tourism

It is beautiful, and a bargain too, a lovely family home.

Aine Curtin

Jean Conroy Tara Conroy Sharon Lynch new holiday home?

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2 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

A fantastic two-page spread with great photographs of the making of the film Moby Dick in Youghal (1954) in the Irish Times last Saturday, July 4th, 2020.

Titled ‘When Two Titians Came To Ireland To Fight Over The White Whale’

The two titans referred to are the award-winning science fiction writer Ray Bradbury who wrote the screenplay for the film and legendary American film director, John Huston.
The film starred Gregory Peck, Richard Basehart, and Leo Genn.

Photo captions show the actor Gregory Peck and John Huston with crowds of locals looking on; The White Whale in Youghal Harbour (This is incorrect as the life-size model of the whale was never filmed in Youghal); Huston turns on the charm for a young fan; The film set at the Market Square, Youghal, and Huston and Ray Bradbury working on the screenplay.
Click on the image to enlarge for better viewing.

“You don’t have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them.” ― Ray Bradbury

"Hollywood has always been a cage… a cage to catch our dreams." – John Huston
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A fantastic two-page spread with great photographs of the making of the film Moby Dick in Youghal (1954) in the Irish Times last Saturday, July 4th, 2020.

Titled When Two Titians Came To Ireland To Fight Over The White Whale

The two titans referred to are the award-winning science fiction writer Ray Bradbury who wrote the screenplay for the film and legendary American film director, John Huston.
The film starred Gregory Peck, Richard Basehart, and Leo Genn.

Photo captions show the actor Gregory Peck and John Huston with crowds of locals looking on; The White Whale in Youghal Harbour (This is incorrect as the life-size model of the whale was never filmed in Youghal); Huston turns on the charm for a young fan; The film set at the Market Square, Youghal, and Huston and Ray Bradbury working on the screenplay.
Click on the image to enlarge for better viewing.   

“You dont have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them.” ― Ray Bradbury

Hollywood has always been a cage... a cage to catch our dreams. - John Huston

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Great memories of this time. Our house was painted for it. Across the street, on the quay, they built a large facade that looked like a building but, was empty on the inside. Every morning the staff/ crew had their break, tons of Thompson’s cakes and tea. I enjoyed the break every morning! No wonder I put on weight. Bernard Miles used our middle bedroom for his office. There wasn’t the spending of a penny in him. Then Gregory Peck came to town and never interacted with the people. All in all it was a great boost for the town!

I was eight years old, memories. My Mom and brother were in several shots.

I was 4 at the time . I remember my Mom and my aunts dressed up for the film.

2 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

Early photos of Community Radio Youghal from the early 1980s. CRY104FM first broadcast on July 4th, 1979, and celebrated their 41st birthday on Saturday last.

Cry Youghal was licensed as a community radio station in 1995 but its history stretches back to 1979 when it began broadcasting as a pirate. Here you can see some of the early photos of those days and some of the early presenters. There are loads to be added to this archive so some presenters are not shown yet.

Pictured are:
Barty Murphy, Bobby Bickerdike, Conor O’Reilly.

Community Radio Youghal – Outside Broadcast Unit at the St. Patrick’s Day Parade back in 1981.

Community Radio Youghal – Outside Broadcast Unit live at the Corpus Christi Procession back in 1982. Commentator Oliver Broderick.

Community Radio Youghal – Outside Broadcast Unit at the quayside during the Shark Safari back in the 80s.

Connolly’s Farm House The farmhouse where Community Radio Youghal broadcast in its early pirate days (courtesy Ian Biggar/DX Archive).

A ladder leading to the Community Radio Youghal studio
at Connolly’s farmhouse (courtesy Ian Biggar/DX Archive.
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Brilliant photos 👏👏

I love the cars

Mary O'Reilly.conor is in this.

Mary O'Reilly

2 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

This is an interesting question by Youghal man Brendan Murphy (originally from Friar street) to The Times newspaper on Saturday, July 4th, 2020.

The Times, Saturday, July 4th, 2020 – A Gripping Life Story Is Always Worth The Wait

Brendan Murphy wrote from Youghal, Co. Cork "Your obituaries are always comprehensive and interesting, but I’m curious as to why some can appear months after the death of the deceased".

Good question. I think Mr Murphy may have been prompted to write by the obituary of Jack King, a former Far East prisoner of war who survived the fall of Singapore and slavery on the Burma railway. He died at 97 back in December, and we published his obituary, a marvellous story, a couple of weeks ago.

Click on the image to read the full explanation by The Times Archive Editor, Rose Wild in her Feedback page.
More Here:
muckrack.com/rose-wild

Related: Click on the link below to see the incredible list of PREMATURE OBITUARIES of people who were still alive at the time of publication.

List of premature obituaries
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_premature_obituaries
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This is an interesting question by Youghal man Brendan Murphy (originally from Friar street) to The Times newspaper on Saturday, July 4th, 2020.

The Times, Saturday, July 4th, 2020 - A Gripping Life Story Is Always Worth The Wait

Brendan Murphy wrote from Youghal, Co. Cork Your obituaries are always comprehensive and interesting, but Im curious as to why some can appear months after the death of the deceased.

Good question. I think Mr Murphy may have been prompted to write by the obituary of Jack King, a former Far East prisoner of war who survived the fall of Singapore and slavery on the Burma railway. He died at 97 back in December, and we published his obituary, a marvellous story, a couple of weeks ago.

Click on the image to read the full explanation by The Times Archive Editor, Rose Wild in her Feedback page.
More Here:
https://muckrack.com/rose-wild

Related: Click on the link below to see the incredible list of PREMATURE OBITUARIES of people who were still alive at the time of publication.

List of premature obituaries
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_premature_obituaries

2 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

Archive: The year 1982
B.L.E. (Bord Luthchleas na hEireann) Now known as Athletics Ireland

Cork Intermediate Cross Country TeamMunster Championships at Tulla Co. Clare 21st Nov 1982

Front: Sean Harte, Willie O’Rourke, George Walsh, Willy Fitzgerald
Back: Joe O’Flynn( Manager) Barty Murphy, Martin Casey, Denis McCarthy, Dennis Keane, Dennis Kiely
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Archive: The year 1982
B.L.E. (Bord Luthchleas na hEireann) Now known as Athletics Ireland 

Cork Intermediate Cross Country TeamMunster Championships at Tulla Co. Clare 21st Nov 1982

Front: Sean Harte, Willie ORourke, George Walsh, Willy Fitzgerald
Back: Joe OFlynn( Manager) Barty Murphy, Martin Casey, Denis McCarthy, Dennis Keane, Dennis Kiely

4 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

HAPPY 4TH JULY TO ALL OUR AMERICAN FRIENDS FROM ALL IN YOUGHAL.

Have a really wonderful day to all our American viewers in the states and also huge birthday wishes to our local radio station Community Radio Youghal – CRY104FM who are celebrating 41 years of broadcasting since their first broadcast from Connolly’s Attic on the Golf Links Road way back on the 4th July 1979.

You can listen to the station by clicking this link Cry Youghal
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HAPPY 4TH JULY TO ALL OUR AMERICAN FRIENDS FROM ALL IN YOUGHAL.

Have a really wonderful day to all our American viewers in the states and also huge birthday wishes to our local radio station Community Radio Youghal - CRY104FM who are celebrating 41 years of broadcasting since their first broadcast from Connollys Attic on the Golf Links Road way back on the 4th July 1979.

You can listen to the station by clicking this link Cry Youghal

4 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

HAPPY 4TH JULY TO ALL OUR AMERICAN FRIENDS FROM ALL IN YOUGHAL – Pictured is the US Flag flying high on the sail ship during the filming of Moby Dick in Youghal Harbour, Co Cork, back in 1954.

Of interest to local viewers – The silhouette of the people standing on the ‘Widow’s Walk’ on the rooftop of the building is Mrs. Buttimer and her son Christy Buttimer waving as the ‘Pequod’ sailed out of the harbour on its epic voyage in the search for Moby Dick.

Have a really wonderful day to all our American viewers in the states and also huge birthday wishes to our local radio station Community Radio Youghal – CRY104FM who are celebrating 41 years of broadcasting since their first broadcast from Connolly’s Attic on the Golf Links Road way back on the 4th July 1979.

You can listen to the station by clicking this link Cry Youghal
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HAPPY 4TH JULY TO ALL OUR AMERICAN FRIENDS FROM ALL IN YOUGHAL - Pictured is the US Flag flying high on the sail ship during the filming of Moby Dick in Youghal Harbour, Co Cork, back in 1954.

Of interest to local viewers - The silhouette of the people standing on the Widows Walk on the rooftop of the building is Mrs. Buttimer and her son Christy Buttimer waving as the Pequod sailed out of the harbour on its epic voyage in the search for Moby Dick.

Have a really wonderful day to all our American viewers in the states and also huge birthday wishes to our local radio station Community Radio Youghal - CRY104FM who are celebrating 41 years of broadcasting since their first broadcast from Connollys Attic on the Golf Links Road way back on the 4th July 1979.

You can listen to the station by clicking this link Cry Youghal

4 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

HAPPY 4TH JULY TO ALL OUR AMERICAN FRIENDS FROM ALL IN YOUGHAL – Pictured is the US Flag flying high on the sail ship during the filming of Moby Dick in Youghal Harbour, Co Cork, back in 1954.

Of interest to local viewers – The silhouette of the people standing on the ‘Widow’s Walk’ on the rooftop of the building is Mrs. Buttimer and her son Christy Buttimer waving as the ‘Pequod’ sailed out of the harbour on its epic voyage in the search for Moby Dick.

Have a really wonderful day to all our American viewers in the states and also huge birthday wishes to our local radio station Community Radio Youghal – CRY104FM who are celebrating 41 years of broadcasting since their first broadcast from Connolly’s Attic on the Golf Links Road way back on the 4th July 1979.

You can listen to the station by clicking this link Cry Youghal
See MoreSee Less

HAPPY 4TH JULY TO ALL OUR AMERICAN FRIENDS FROM ALL IN YOUGHAL - Pictured is the US Flag flying high on the sail ship during the filming of Moby Dick in Youghal Harbour, Co Cork, back in 1954.

Of interest to local viewers - The silhouette of the people standing on the Widows Walk on the rooftop of the building is  Mrs. Buttimer and her son Christy Buttimer waving as the Pequod sailed out of the harbour on its epic voyage in the search for Moby Dick.

Have a really wonderful day to all our American viewers in the states and also huge birthday wishes to our local radio station Community Radio Youghal - CRY104FM who are celebrating 41 years of broadcasting since their first broadcast from Connollys Attic on the Golf Links Road way back on the 4th July 1979.

You can listen to the station by clicking this link Cry Youghal

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Everyone remembers the famous signers Hancock, Franklin, Jefferson and Adams here are a little more obscure ones: -John Hart of New Jersey was on the run from British troops and was reduced to hiding in caves. -George Clymer of Pennsylvania had his home targeted by British troops and ransacked -When British troops occupied the home of Thomas Nelson Jr of Virginia he ordered it fired upon instead held by the enemy -Francis Lewis of New York had his home fired upon ransacked and his wife thrown in prison -Abraham Clark of New Jersey had his sons imprisoned -Richard Stockton also of New Jersey was thrown into prison himself While these men didn’t get the fame and glory others got they definitely have earned it.

Great picture!

I have the original picture of my mother and Christy at home.

Andi and John Tobin 🇵🇷 😘

Thank you!!

🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

Thanks Olive!

Eileen Myers Lisa Buckley

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5 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

The S.S. ‘Ary’ by Mike Hackett

The steamship ‘Ary’ foundered during a raging storm/blizzard in February 1947 – – while on a voyage from Port Talbot in Wales to C.I.E. in Waterford with a cargo of coal. Many senior citizens will remember that winter as bringing the heaviest snow for decades. People living in the country-side could not get out of their houses and thousands of animals died in the fields.

Only one sailor of the ‘Ary’ lived to tell the story of the terrible end of the steam ship. Jan Dorucki (19 years) was washed ashore in one of the ship’s lifeboats at Mine Head, Old Parish near Dungarvan and this is the tale of his ordeal on the high seas.

The ‘Ary’ left Port Talbot, under Captain E Kolk and set a course for Waterford. The weather was bitterly cold with heavy seas running. Shortly after leaving Port Talbot – – the weather turned really foul with high winds and the sea became extremely rough. It was the beginning of the end for the ‘Ary’.
The precious cargo of coal began to shift – – due to the continuous buffeting of the waves – – thereby causing a list. The crew made frantic efforts to stop the coal from shifting – – but to no avail. The list was now increasing rapidly.
The Captain gave the order to his crew to abandon ship and two lifeboats were lowered into the raging ocean. But the boats had only barely moved away from the now foundering vessel when she suddenly dived to a watery grave – – leaving her crew to the mercy of the elements. Then to their awful horror – – when they thought that things could not get worse – – there were no oars, sails, engine or food on board.

They drifted and drifted in the high seas and the terrible cold. Jan Dorucki pulled a tarpaulin over his head in an effort to escape the worst – – and soon he was in a deep sleep. When he awoke at dawn – – the scene was shocking. His companions in the lifeboat were all dead – – having succumbed during the night in temperatures below zero. Jan became very nervous with all dead men on board and so he began to push them into the sea.

With sleet and rain still falling – – the boat began to drift in towards sheer cliffs at Old Parish in County Waterford. Although suffering from severe frostbite – – he staggered out of the open boat when it struck the rocks. Then with his strength failing – – he began to climb the cliff face – – a seemingly impossible task. He succeeded in reaching the cliff top and crawled in an exhausted condition to a nearby household. Jan Dorucki thought at first that he had landed in France – – and it was when he reached the home of the Hourigan family that he found it was Ireland. Mr. Hourigan attended to his immediate needs and then conveyed him to Dungarvan hospital for medical treatment.

When Jan was examined at the hospital – – an awful discovery was made – – the frostbite was extremely severe and gangrene was setting into his legs. The medical staff did everything possible for the brave determined survivor of the ship wreck – – but in the end – – the legs had to be amputated. The operation was carried out successfully and now he had to learn to walk again. A set of artificial legs were obtained and after several months – – he took his first steps outside the hospital. Jan went back home to Poland eventually — and sadly all contact with him was lost.

During the week after the ship wreck – – bodies were washed up along the West Waterford shoreline. Garda Sergeant Gallagher was the man to organise the search parties and collect the bodies. They were laid out in the Fire Station at Ardmore in what witnesses described as a harrowing scene. All were buried in St. Declan’s cemetery in Ardmore – – in a special plot – – not far from the famous Round Tower.

We move from then (1947) on to 1977 – – when Kevin Gallagher (son of the Garda Sergeant) returned from England. He went to visit the grave of the sailors of the ‘S.S.Ary’ that his father had been so involved in – – and he was very disappointed at the condition of it. Kevin resolved to make it a fitting and respectable place-of-rest for the fifteen crew of the ship who are buried there. The people from all over the West Waterford coast chipped in to pay for the upgrading of the mass grave. James Kiely, of Kiely Undertakers Dungarvan, made a big donation that resulted in a fine headstone being unveiled in November 1977. At that time – – every effort was made to locate Jan Dorucki in Poland before the event but no trace could be found. It would have been so nice and of course very emotional to have him attend it. Kevin Gallagher died in 2005 – – leaving a fine memorial to the crew of sailors from Poland, Spain, Wales and England.

We move on again to the year 2000 – – when another piece of the jigsaw fell into place. Mrs. Annie Lonergan from Sarsfield Terrace in Youghal told of being in Dungarvan Hospital in 1947 when Jan Dorucki was brought in. She was astounded at how jovial he was – – having lost his legs – – and it made her see life from a different angle. Annie remembered him going across the dining room by jumping on his bottom from chair to chair around by the walls. Annie (nee Condon) was originally from Ballygunner in Waterford City and passed away in December 2001. A few years ago, I was collecting my grand-daughter Tia from Ballygunner National School – – and while I was waiting at the gate a man asked me where did I live. When I said between Ardmore and Youghal – – he asked me if I knew Annie Lonergan. “I sure do” I replied. He then went on to point to a house about three fields away. “That house” he went on to say “Was where Annie (Condon) was born and reared”. He turned out to be a cousin of hers. It’s a small world!

Thanks to John Young for helping me with this story and for presenting me with his ‘Maritime History of Dungarvan. Thanks also to Tony Gallagher for the photos and to Jacinta Lonergan and her sister Anne in Australia for confirmation about her mother Annie’s involvement.
– Mike Hackett.

The picture shows the young Lonergan family of Sarsfield Terrace, Youghal, and group photo of Annie Lonergan ( in the centre wearing glasses) with family, friends, and neighbours at a social event back in the 1974.
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The S.S. ‘Ary’ by Mike Hackett 

The steamship ‘Ary’ foundered during a raging storm/blizzard in February 1947 - - while on a voyage from Port Talbot in Wales to C.I.E. in Waterford with a cargo of coal.  Many senior citizens will remember that winter as bringing the heaviest snow for decades. People living in the country-side could not get out of their houses and thousands of animals died in the fields.

Only one sailor of the ‘Ary’ lived to tell the story of the terrible end of the steam ship.  Jan Dorucki (19 years) was washed ashore in one of the ship’s lifeboats at Mine Head, Old Parish near Dungarvan and this is the tale of his ordeal on the high seas.

The ‘Ary’ left Port Talbot, under Captain E Kolk and set a course for Waterford.  The weather was bitterly cold with heavy seas running.  Shortly after leaving Port Talbot - - the weather turned really foul with high winds and the sea became extremely rough.  It was the beginning of the end for the ‘Ary’. 
The precious cargo of coal began to shift - - due to the continuous buffeting of the waves - - thereby causing a list.  The crew made frantic efforts to stop the coal from shifting - - but to no avail.  The list was now increasing rapidly.
The Captain gave the order to his crew to abandon ship and two lifeboats were lowered into the raging ocean.  But the boats had only barely moved away from the now foundering vessel when she suddenly dived to a watery grave - - leaving her crew to the mercy of the elements.  Then to their awful horror - - when they thought that things could not get worse - - there were no oars, sails, engine or food on board.  

They drifted and drifted in the high seas and the terrible cold.  Jan Dorucki pulled a tarpaulin over his head in an effort to escape the worst - - and soon he was in a deep sleep.  When he awoke at dawn - - the scene was shocking.  His companions in the lifeboat were all dead - - having succumbed during the night in temperatures below zero.  Jan became very nervous with all dead men on board and so he began to push them into the sea.  

With sleet and rain still falling - - the boat began to drift in towards sheer cliffs at Old Parish in County Waterford.  Although suffering from severe frostbite - - he staggered out of the open boat when it struck the rocks.  Then with his strength failing - - he began to climb the cliff face - - a seemingly impossible task.  He succeeded in reaching the cliff top and crawled in an exhausted condition to a nearby household.  Jan Dorucki thought at first that he had landed in France - - and it was when he reached the home of the Hourigan family that he found it was Ireland.  Mr. Hourigan attended to his immediate needs and then conveyed him to Dungarvan hospital for medical treatment.  

When Jan was examined at the hospital - - an awful discovery was made - - the frostbite was extremely severe and gangrene was setting into his legs. The medical staff did everything possible for the brave determined survivor of the ship wreck - - but in the end - - the legs had to be amputated.  The operation was carried out successfully and now he had to learn to walk again.  A set of artificial legs were obtained and after several months - - he took his first steps outside the hospital.  Jan went back home to Poland eventually -- and sadly all contact with him was lost.  

During the week after the ship wreck - - bodies were washed up along the West Waterford shoreline.  Garda Sergeant Gallagher was the man to organise the search parties and collect the bodies.  They were laid out in the Fire Station at Ardmore in what witnesses described as a harrowing scene.  All were buried in St. Declan’s cemetery in Ardmore - - in a special plot - - not far from the famous Round Tower.  

We move from then (1947) on to 1977 - - when Kevin Gallagher (son of the Garda Sergeant) returned from England. He went to visit the grave of the sailors of the ‘S.S.Ary’ that his father had been so involved in - - and he was very disappointed at the condition of it.  Kevin resolved to make it a fitting and respectable place-of-rest for the fifteen crew of the ship who are buried there.  The people from all over the West Waterford coast chipped in to pay for the upgrading of the mass grave.  James Kiely, of Kiely Undertakers Dungarvan, made a big donation that resulted in a fine headstone being unveiled in November 1977.  At that time - - every effort was made to locate Jan Dorucki in Poland before the event but no trace could be found.  It would have been so nice and of course very emotional to have him attend it.  Kevin Gallagher died in 2005 - - leaving a fine memorial to the crew of sailors from Poland, Spain, Wales and England. 

We move on again to the year 2000 - - when another piece of the jigsaw fell into place.  Mrs. Annie Lonergan from Sarsfield Terrace in Youghal told of being in Dungarvan Hospital in 1947 when Jan Dorucki was brought in.  She was astounded at how jovial he was - - having lost his legs - - and it made her see life from a different angle.  Annie remembered him going across the dining room by jumping on his bottom from chair to chair around by the walls.  Annie (nee Condon) was originally from Ballygunner in Waterford City and passed away in December 2001.  A few years ago, I was collecting my grand-daughter Tia from Ballygunner National School - - and while I was waiting at the gate a man asked me where did I live.  When I said between Ardmore and Youghal - - he asked me if I knew Annie Lonergan.  “I sure do” I replied.  He then went on to point to a house about three fields away.  “That house” he went on to say “Was where Annie (Condon) was born and reared”.  He turned out to be a cousin of hers.   It’s a small world!

Thanks to John Young for helping me with this story and for presenting me with his ‘Maritime History of Dungarvan.  Thanks also to Tony Gallagher for the photos and to Jacinta Lonergan and her sister Anne in Australia for confirmation about her mother Annie’s involvement. 
- Mike Hackett.

The picture shows the young Lonergan family of Sarsfield Terrace, Youghal, and group photo of Annie Lonergan ( in the centre wearing glasses) with family, friends, and neighbours at a social event back in the 1974.Image attachmentImage attachment

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Love ur storys so interesting 👋👋👋❤️

Very interesting enjoyed reading it. Thank you Mike.

Very interesting story Michael Hackett one of Youghal’s finest gentlemen thank you

Very interesting story Michael thank you 😊

I think the surname may not be spelt correctly and this could have hampered efforts to find Jan?

Such a great story. Annie was such a lovely person too ❤

Great story

Wow xx

Tracey Savage your Nan is in this x

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