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2 days ago
YoughalOnline.com

The late Irish comedian and actor Niall Tóibín talking about his childhood visits to Youghal town and its historic connection with British history. There are great scenes of the town and river and archive footage from the early part of the 19th century. Perks, a trip up the river, memories of Horgans and Hurst's Regal cinema on Friar street as well as scenes inside St. Mary's Parish Church can be seen. A lovely film of the town. ... See MoreSee Less

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Totally agree with Niall, my best childhood memories were spent in Youghal .. My Mum & Dad used to go there in the 50’s and they took me there as a baby right up to my teens , we spent every school holiday in Youghal , I learnt to walk, swim & Fish in Youghal. , my Dad loved to fish and loved the chance to speak our native language with the locals ..., so like Niall as soon as I turn the corner at the light house all my childhood memories come rushing in like the mackerel did off the strand side of Green Park ... A great loss to Youghal when the train station closed . Martin O'halloran

Declan mc Loughlin

This is a fantastic look at Youghal back in time ,????A MUST WATCH

2 days ago
YoughalOnline.com

Great film scenes in and around Youghal town from the year 1987. ... See MoreSee Less

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My mother Nora Finn at 59:35. Thanks to Kevin O Halloran for bringing it to my attention. Mary Roche Noreen Mccarthy

Great video, 👏👏👏

Barry Lupton, Theresa Mcpadden

4 days ago
YoughalOnline.com

UPDATE SATURDAY 4TH DECEMBER:

Congratulations to Mark Ansbro winner of the two tickets to see Donal Clancy live in concert at the Mall Arts Centre.

From:
Sinead Goggin Entertainments manager of Yew Wood Venues

Mark Ansbro Congratulations Mark you are the winner of the youghalonline competition for two tickets to Donal Clancy in the Mall Arts Centre. Show starts at 3.30 tomorrow, your tickets will be waiting for you at the door! (ends)

(FRIDAY 3RD DECEMBER) WIN TWO TICKETS to see Donal Clancy in concert at The Mall Arts Centre, Youghal this Sunday 5th December. Simply answer the question and put your answer in the comment box below. Sinead Goggin from the Yew Wood Venues will pick and notify the winner tomorrow Saturday afternoon.

Question: The Mall Arts Centre in Youghal is located right next to one of Ireland's greatest and magnificent rivers. What is the name of the river? Put your answer in the comment box below and best of luck to the winners. Sinead will be in contact.

Donal Clancy is regarded as one of Ireland's finest guitarists. He never ceases to amaze, amuse and warm our hearts with his vast range of material. For added entertainment, Donal brings along Rylan Davies as his special guest. We are in for a very fine afternoon of music and song.

Tickets €5.00 are available at Youghal Heritage Office, 85 North Main Street, Youghal or yewwoodvenues.com.

Part of The Yew Wood Venues presents a 'Sunday Afternoon Concert Series',
Supported by The Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media and Cork County Council.

Celebrate Christmas with us! The Mall Arts Centre, Youghal is delighted to present for your delectation an amazing line of artists in December!!
Youghal.ie
... See MoreSee Less

UPDATE SATURDAY 4TH DECEMBER:

Congratulations to Mark Ansbro winner of the two tickets to see Donal Clancy live in concert at the Mall Arts Centre.

From:
Sinead Goggin Entertainments manager of Yew Wood Venues

Mark Ansbro Congratulations Mark you are the winner of the youghalonline competition for two tickets to Donal Clancy in the Mall Arts Centre. Show starts at 3.30 tomorrow, your tickets will be waiting for you at the door! (ends)

(FRIDAY 3RD DECEMBER) WIN TWO TICKETS to see Donal Clancy in concert at The Mall Arts Centre, Youghal this Sunday 5th December. Simply answer the question and put your answer in the comment box below. Sinead Goggin from the Yew Wood Venues will pick and notify the winner tomorrow Saturday afternoon.

Question: The Mall Arts Centre in Youghal is located right next to one of Irelands greatest and magnificent rivers. What is the name of the river? Put your answer in the comment box below and best of luck to the winners. Sinead will be in contact.

Donal Clancy is regarded as one of Irelands finest guitarists. He never ceases to amaze, amuse and warm our hearts with his vast range of material.  For added entertainment, Donal brings along Rylan Davies as his special guest.  We are in for a very fine afternoon of music and song.

Tickets €5.00 are available at Youghal Heritage Office, 85 North Main Street, Youghal or yewwoodvenues.com.

Part of The Yew Wood Venues presents a Sunday Afternoon Concert Series,
Supported by The Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media and Cork County Council.

Celebrate Christmas with us! The Mall Arts Centre, Youghal is delighted to present for your delectation an amazing line of artists in December!!
Youghal.ie

Comment on Facebook

The beautiful River Blackwater Youghal Co Cork

The river Blackwater.

The Mouth of the River Blackwater that flows into the sea at Youghal, Co Cork.

The Blackwater!

The river Blackwater

The River blackwater

The River Blackwater

The river Blackwater 🤞

Congrats Mark xxx

The Blackwater 😃

The Blackwater.

The blackwater

The Blackwater

The blackwater

Mark Treacy The Blackwater

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4 days ago
YoughalOnline.com

The ‘Divings’ - near the Youghal Lighthouse.

For generations the ‘Divings’ at Youghal Lighthouse has been attracting good swimmers. It is found by going down a steep walkway beside the lighthouse perimeter wall to the rocks below where you find a good depth of water between them. For an hour before and an hour after high tide, it is a natural swimming pool. The local authority used to erect a diving board there every year for the summer and then it was removed in the autumn until the next year. But in recent years there is no sign of the diving board. Perhaps an insurance issue is again raising its ugly head. That walkway is said to be the oldest path in town – it was used by invaders and pirates over the centuries. It predates the Lighthouse (1852) by hundreds of years. The ‘Divings’ was well known to be a ‘Men Only’ bathing place and older people remember when a notice stating that fact was fixed to the wall at the start of the pathway. It all went back to the days when mixed bathing was frowned upon. However, only a hundred yards further on, in the direction of the ‘Head of the Rock’ (Moll Goggin’s Corner), females in bikinis could be seen lying in the sun. They were admired by the passing throng meandering high up on the main road footpath as they made their way to the Front Strand beach.

Men walked out from town daily to swim at the ‘Divings’. Some even went into the water every day of the whole year, in winter and summer. A great friendship was built up between the attendees and it became like an unofficial club. The majority have passed on to a higher place where the waves are less turbulent and the sun always shines.

Mikie Joyce of South Cross Road was a very strong man and a great swimmer. It is said that on a few occasions he left the ‘Divings’ and swam out around the two buoys in Youghal Bay and back, a distance of about six miles. It seemed like he could swim forever provided that the sea was not too rough. Mikie was a lifeguard at the strand in 1949 and he was entrusted with patrolling from the gap at the railway station to Redbarn (over a mile) for a wage of £1 -10s. per week. That was before he started to do somersaults into the water from the diving board at the ‘Divings’. Vincie Carroll was another to be seen walking towards the lighthouse with his towel under his arm. Then you had Derry O’Sullivan, owner of the Anchor Bar, who also walked the mile to the lighthouse ‘Divings’ for his swim. Bill Field, of the famous printing family, was another regular. Kevin Stack and his brother-in-law Joe O’Dea were part of the ‘club’ too.

Eamon O’Halloran who was a retired Garda back from Dublin loved to meet with the gang and enjoy the cold water. He was a good entertainer and could imitate Miceal O’Muircheartaigh and Miceal O’Hehir who were famous commentators very well, creating tremendous laughter. Then every 1st day of June, Eamon would appear to declare the ‘Divings’ open for another season. The pals would have acquired a red ribbon with a scissors and while two people held it – Eamon cut the ribbon.

Again at the end of October, as the clocks were about to go back the hour for winter, he would declare the place closed and that it would now be illegal to swim there. All good fun! A brother of Eamon and sister-in-law were lost when the Viscount aeroplane ‘St. Phelim’ went down off Tuskar Rock in 1968.

Now we come to a West-Waterford connection; a teacher in Dungarvan for years, Liam Burke, was another to enjoy the water at the ‘Divings’. Liam is now retired from Ard Scoil na nDeise. He is also retired from the Youghal Town Council and so has plenty of time to do his swimming. He gave tremendous input into this story and supplied all the photos. Buiochas Liam.

Fr. John Slattery was another who loved to dive in. He was a big man and tended to make an almighty splash. When Fr. John would come out of the water to ask onlookers how his dive went, he would be told bluntly “It was a belly-bust”. Joe Hallissey, photographer, was a September swimmer (too busy taking photos during the summer) and he would float on his back while smoking a cigarette and reading a newspaper. There would be much appreciation and clapping for Joe’s tricks from the onlookers and he loved it. The living nearby light-house keeper, Martin Boyle, could go into the water twice a day at every high tide. Other regular swimmers were Pierce Hennessy, Noel Dempsey, Kieran Walsh, Paddy Mulcahy, Tadhg Kelleher, Liam Coveney and Seamus Walsh.

By Mike Hackett.
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Comment on Facebook

Fab story I met some of the swimmers one day and they told me how they clean up the rubbish left out there

Thank you for sharing. I didn’t have a photo of my uncle Mike in his lifeguard jumper before x

Brave men lovely bit of history of Youghal

Super photos

Lovely photos

Great story thanks

Ahhh how lovely to see 😍

Dee Newson G’dad Mikey ❤️

Rebecca O' Grady

Catherine Sweetnam

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1 week ago
YoughalOnline.com

Poster of 'The Walter Raleigh Potato Festival' held in Youghal. The festival was very popular at one time and was held annually. In some places Sir Walter is demonised but here in Youghal he was celebrated with a feast full of activities culminating in the Elizabethan Ball held in the then Hilltop Hotel (GiGi's). See attached poster from 1991 of the various events in a fun packed week.

The festival opened with a concert by the Irish traditional band 'Galleon' and other events included a freestyle 'Break Dancing' competition at Nealon's Quay and outdoor disco's. On the penultimate day, Sir Walt arrived by a special train called the 'Sea Breeze Express' from Cork to Youghal and was greeted by hundreds at the Youghal Railway Station. Do you remember the 'Barman's Race' starting at the Youghal Post Office as they raced up the town balancing a tray full of drinks or the round the town cycle race.

Sadly lots of these places are no more and the Youghal St. Mary's Brass and Reed Band are badly missed. The whole community took part and was a huge cultural and economic success. As the poster said 'A feast of fun for all'.

Years later there was another festival called 'Youghal Celebrates History' and featured actors from Roanoke Island, North Carolina, USA. Because of the connection with Sir Walter Raleigh and Roanoke and Youghal - he colonised both places and was Youghal's first Mayor.

The troupe performed their play to commemorate the history of the first English colonies in North America on Roanoke Island and ended with Sir Walter getting the chop on stage in the Mall Arts Centre. It was a such strange sight to see the American actors dresses in full Elizabethan costume as they paraded around town and enjoying the hospitality of the local public houses. Youghal is certainly full of history.
Thanks to Noel Cronin from Community Radio Youghal for the poster.
... See MoreSee Less

Poster of The Walter Raleigh Potato Festival held in Youghal. The festival was very popular at one time and was held annually. In some places Sir Walter is demonised but here in Youghal he was celebrated with a feast full of activities culminating in the Elizabethan Ball held in the then Hilltop Hotel (GiGis). See attached poster from 1991 of the various events in a fun packed week.

The festival opened with a concert by the Irish traditional band Galleon and other events included a freestyle Break Dancing competition at Nealons Quay and outdoor discos. On the penultimate day, Sir Walt arrived by a special train called the Sea Breeze Express from Cork to Youghal and was greeted by hundreds at the Youghal Railway Station. Do you remember the Barmans Race starting at the Youghal Post Office as they raced up the town balancing a tray full of drinks or the round the town cycle race.

Sadly lots of these places are no more and the Youghal St. Marys Brass and Reed Band are badly missed. The whole community took part and was a huge cultural and economic success. As the poster said A feast of fun for all.

Years later there was another festival called Youghal Celebrates History and featured actors from Roanoke Island, North Carolina, USA. Because of the connection with Sir Walter Raleigh and Roanoke and Youghal - he colonised both places and was Youghals first Mayor.

The troupe performed their play to commemorate the history of the first English colonies in North America on Roanoke Island and ended with Sir Walter getting the chop on stage in the Mall Arts Centre. It was a such strange sight to see the American actors dresses in full Elizabethan costume as they paraded around town and enjoying the hospitality of the local public houses. Youghal is certainly full of history.
Thanks to Noel Cronin from Community Radio Youghal for the poster.

Comment on Facebook

I ran in the bar persons race for snoopers, maureen linehan for mobys ,Ann power for black water in .Great fun

I remember it well I was involved in every one of them

Great times in Youghal,.Youghal International Busking Festival was an other one, had a life span of 10 years .🎷🎻🎶🎸🎪🎵🥁

Everyone of these events created a great buzz in town.

Was good festival but cant say who stopped town enjoy itself

I won the limerick competition...

The band the Galleon were great back then 🎤🎼

Eileen there was peeling and potato cookery, the humble spud restaurant (at hannons friar St) entered potato chock truffles who would even think to mix them. Aherne's came up with their smoked salmon potato gratin and its still going😊👏👏

I remember a potato peeling competition??

Brian Foley That was a busy Calendar Week for us 😁😁😁😁🚲🚲🚲🚲🚲🚲⏰⏳

Kay Curtin you never told me about the Spud Parties! 🥳

Did Pat Ruth build the Hiiltop Hotel?

Omg

Paul Seymour

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1 week ago
YoughalOnline.com

Memories of Musicals in Youghal - 1970s

The Children of Lir was a folk musical by Brian O'Reilly from the band 'Loudest Whisper' and was staged in Youghal sometime in the 1970s and presented by the then 'Youghal Community Promotions'. It was so popular it sold out more shows than Garth Brooks upcoming concerts in Dublin [Citation needed]

The origin of The Children of Lir came from a debut album by Irish folk rock/progressive folk group Loudest Whisper back in 1974 and later adapted as a folk rock musical which were increasingly popular at the time. Remember the spread of the folk music style of mass in the seventies.?

The Children of Lir is a legend from Irish mythology. It is a tale from the post-Christianisation period that mixes magical elements such as druidic wands and spells with a Christian message of Christian faith bringing freedom from suffering.

The acknowledgements in the Children of Lir brochure says it was the musical that united the strand and the town thanks to American politician and diplomat, Henry Kissinger (Détente). How much of this is true. Some say it's too early to tell.

Incidentally the original 1974 LP release of 'The Children of Lir' has become one of the most sought after records in Ireland, and currently ranks among the top 100 rarest records in the world!

Do you remember the Children of Lir when it was performed in town. Were you in the cast. Where was it staged in town? Please leave a comment below.

Pictured is the original brochure of then musical.
... See MoreSee Less

Memories of Musicals in Youghal - 1970s

The Children of Lir was a folk musical by Brian OReilly from the band Loudest Whisper and was staged in Youghal sometime in the 1970s and presented by the then Youghal Community Promotions. It was so popular it sold out more shows than Garth Brooks upcoming concerts in Dublin [Citation needed]

The origin of The Children of Lir came from a debut album by Irish folk rock/progressive folk group Loudest Whisper back in 1974 and later adapted as a folk rock musical which were increasingly popular at the time. Remember the spread of the folk music style of mass in the seventies.?

The Children of Lir is a legend from Irish mythology. It is a tale from the post-Christianisation period that mixes magical elements such as druidic wands and spells with a Christian message of Christian faith bringing freedom from suffering.

The acknowledgements in the Children of Lir brochure says it was the musical that united the strand and the town thanks to American politician and diplomat, Henry Kissinger (Détente). How much of this is true. Some say its too early to tell.

Incidentally the original 1974 LP release of The Children of Lir has become one of the most sought after records in Ireland, and currently ranks among the top 100 rarest records in the world!

Do you remember the Children of Lir when it was performed in town. Were you in the cast. Where was it staged in town? Please leave a comment below.

Pictured is the original brochure of then musical.Image attachment
1 week ago
YoughalOnline.com

Youghal Town Sparkles: The new Christmas tree lights up Barry's Lane in Youghal town centre. The beautiful tree is straight out of the wrapper and was installed today, Friday, 26th, November, 2021 and what a wonderful sight it is.

The switching on of the town's Christmas lights took place last weekend and the whole business community, local town council, and the residents living on the street have gone to extraordinary lengths with their wonderful window decorations to collectively help put the sparkle in Youghal for Christmas 2021.

The Christmas Market is returning to Barrys Lane once again on 11th & 18th December 2021.
... See MoreSee Less

Youghal Town Sparkles: The new Christmas tree lights up Barrys Lane in Youghal town centre. The beautiful tree is straight out of the wrapper and was installed today, Friday, 26th, November, 2021 and what a wonderful sight it is.

The switching on of the towns Christmas lights took place last weekend and the whole business community, local town council, and the residents living on the street have gone to extraordinary lengths with their wonderful window decorations to collectively help put the sparkle in Youghal for Christmas 2021.

The Christmas Market is returning to Barrys Lane once again on 11th & 18th December 2021.

Comment on Facebook

looks great ❤

Beautiful.

1 week ago
YoughalOnline.com

Magical moment as the new Youghal Christmas tree lights up Barry's Lane in the town centre. The beautiful tree is straight out of the wrapper and was installed today, Friday, 26th, November, 2021, and what a wonderful sight it is.

The switching on of the town's Christmas lights took place last weekend and the whole business community, local town council, and the residents living on the street have gone to extraordinary lengths with their wonderful window decorations to collectively help put the sparkle in Youghal for Christmas 2021.

The Christmas Market is returning to Barrys Lane once again on 11th & 18th December 2021.
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

lovely but clinical as no people around !!!!!!! Dismal street lighting doesn't help !!!!!!!!

The barriers destroy this also !!!!!!!!!!!!!!?

2 weeks ago
YoughalOnline.com

Old Youghal photo looking towards the town. Anyone have an idea where this picture was taken. Pease leave in the comment box below and help make Youghal history. Photo most likely pre 1950 ... See MoreSee Less

Old Youghal photo looking towards the town. Anyone have an idea where this picture was taken. Pease leave in the comment box below and help make Youghal history. Photo most likely pre 1950

Comment on Facebook

Windmill Hill

We usd to walk up that lane to school in the 70s windmill hill .

Windmill hill.

Windmill Hill

Looks like Haymens hill to me ferrypoint hidden behind house on the left

I think I live in those cottages now 1 house

Windmill hill

Hay mans hill Shirley Hollingsworth now lives there

Hay Mans Hill

Haymans Hill

Haymens Hill

Haymen’s hill?

I think it’s Windmill Hill

Haymens hill ‘ up the side of the Devonshire arms

Windmill hill, if you look towards the river today I suspect same view from there.

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2 weeks ago
YoughalOnline.com

Poor times in town. By Mike Hackett.
In the laneways of towns long ago – people were great to share what little they had with the neighbours. When they had a few fish to spare – or extra soup – it was given to those in need. Those same neighbours would be given similar generosity when thing were reversed. Asking the butcher for bones for the dog was no problem – even if you didn’t have a dog. You heard the story about the little boy in the butcher’s shop with his mother. When he heard her asking for a bone for the dog – he innocently cheered - “Great! - We’re getting a dog”. Picking blackberries, crab apples and wild mushrooms were all part of seasonal survival. And don’t forget the rabbit stew – well cooked in a pot on a crane over the fire.

Big towns like Dungarvan and Youghal had a gasworks – and this meant that coke (coal from which the gas had been extracted) could be bought for half the price of real coal. It was good for putting at the back of the fire – and pouring a little water on it helped it to last all night as a red base.

Cigarettes were scarce during the Second World War and for years afterwards. Most men of that era – and some women – smoked. It was fashionable – and of course addictive. Well-known brands like Sweet Afton, Wild Woodbines, Gold Flake and Players Please – could not be had from any shop in the war years. The only brand available came from America – the type called Camel. Smokers thought of them as very strong and they were not liked.

An old woman went into Moss Kelly’s shop – at the bottom of Chapel Lane – for five Woodbines. Then on being told by the counter lady that they had only Camels – she was annoyed and replied “You ought to put Moss up on one of them”. After the war ended – the Irish brands slowly returned – but money was in short supply.

Thousands of soldiers had been demobbed and work was hard to get – many went to England to build the cities following all the bombing. One shop at South Main Street in Youghal – owned by Mague-Jeff Russell – started selling the woodbines one-at-a-time. A paper packet of five was four pence and a single fag was a penny – then by so doing – Mague was getting five pence for every four penny packet. She was also providing a smoke to poor people with only a penny to spend.

We think back to the days when families from Cork with a lot of children - would bring them all to the seaside by train on Sundays in the summer. The problem was finding the fare for the train. However – as we said before – the men on the turnstiles/gates were very kind and understanding. The parents would have purchased two adult fares and maybe two more for the children – but they had no hope of paying for their ten kids. That was when the gate men turned a blind-eye as the kids ran past the adults to swarm onto the train. Everybody knew what was happening – and poor people needed to be supported.

The pawn shops were before my time – but many stories survive about how goods and treasures were pawned so that folk could eat. One tale tells of a woman pawning her husband’s suit of clothes every Monday morning – and then redeeming it on the following Saturday (for Sunday Mass) after he got paid. When she was reminded about the shilling that it was costing her every week – she replied “Sure we haven’t even a wardrobe in our tenement abode – how would I keep it dry and respectable for him to wear it on Sunday?”

And the story about the very kind old woman on Cork Hill who would have the kids in her house after school to help them with their homework. But what she was really doing during that time – was giving them some bread and soup to sustain them.

Mile Buiochas do Clann Horgan i gcoir na pictiuri. Many thanks to the Horgan Family for the use of their invaluable photos.

Photos –
Cork Hill in 1896
Mague-Jeff Russell’s shop
Main Street, Youghal in 1910
Quay Lane vegetable sales
Alms Houses
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Comment on Facebook

I remember with my friends going into Ma Russell’s in the late 50’s buying a penny woodbine I was only 9 and we’d share the smoke

So interesting Mike. My dad used to tell us about buying the occasional penny woodbines and having a sneaky smoke 😊

Brilliant read. I was one of the lads on the train. Happy days.

Lovely piece of history Michael Hackett. ‘Importance of being kind’ ❤️

Lovely article. Tough times then

I painted the Alms Houses when they were refurbished ... Michael Hussey

is that Tomas Daly coming out of Russell

Super interesting.My mom is from Clonpriest and I was able to visit 3 times before my grand parents died.

Love Reading the memories mick.

Brilliant Mike// so so different now//

Great history & photos.

Do true Dermot.

That you such such an interesting article.

Mary Broderick

Thanks Michael

Nice touch

Mag Jeffs, you could buy 1 fag

Cecilia Cronin

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2 weeks ago
YoughalOnline.com

Interesting advertisements from Youghal businesses in the 'Youghal Show Society' brochure from 1970. It was the eleventh annual Horticultural Show held in the Town Hall, Youghal. ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Great to see how some of the busineses advertised are still going.

2 weeks ago
YoughalOnline.com

"It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas
Everywhere you go
Take a look at the Youghal Pipe Band
with bagpipes in their hands
and Santa hats and kilts on show."

Pictured are the Youghal Pipe Band walking down Cork Hill to perform at the switching on of the Christmas lights on Saturday 20th November 2021 at the Market Square in town.
... See MoreSee Less

Its beginning to look a lot like Christmas
Everywhere you go
Take a look at the Youghal Pipe Band
with bagpipes in their hands
and Santa hats and kilts on show.

Pictured are the Youghal Pipe Band walking down Cork Hill to perform at the switching on of the Christmas lights on Saturday 20th November 2021 at the Market Square in town.

Comment on Facebook

I was born in Youghal and would love to know what tartan the band are wearing Thank you x

I wore this for the Highlands games in my hometown of Corby Northamptonshire

Brilliant well done everyone 🎅🤶

Well done, looking good Paul Mulcahy

Pearl what did Noel say ……lol go on tell us ………lol Or what did you say ……lol Great photo folks.

Looking good Noel

Brilliant! 👏👏

Get out the way Pearl Mc Carthy😂

Well done

Looking well Pearl Mc Carthy

A great sight after all this time

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