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19 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

18/01/2021

Launch of €65,000 Covid 19 Emergency Fund for Cork County

Cork County Council is inviting applications from community and voluntary groups for funding under the Covid 19 Emergency Fund.

This is the third tranche of this scheme for Cork County, which is funded by the Department of Rural and Community Development and aims to provide a flexible and targeted approach to funding communities most in need. Some examples of applications include;

Adapting services and operations to fit the new Covid 19 reality, e.g. allowing for changes to premises to provide for social distancing, funding for on-line activities and provision of critical social supports.
Assisting communities in their participation in the Government’s ‘Keep Well’ campaign which focusses on the themes of staying connected, switching off and being creative and minding your mood.
Support to Community and Voluntary groups involved in the Community Call.
Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr Mary Linehan Foley, is encouraging community groups to apply, “This fund will support community and voluntary groups who are assisting a large number of vulnerable people to get through the current Covid 19 and in turn highlights the tremendous community spirit throughout our towns and villages.”

Chief Executive of Cork County Council, Tim Lucey, went on to say, “Cork County Council is delighted to be able to add to the €116k already distributed to community and voluntary groups under the previous tranches and acknowledge that the past twelve months have been a difficult time for all,”

There are two types of grants available under the programme, grants up to a maximum of €1,000 and grants in excess of €1,000. Applications can be made online at www.yourcouncil.ie Closing date for applications is Friday, 5th February at 4:00pm. All allocated monies will have to be spent by August 31st 2021.

The funding will be administered locally by Cork County Council’s Local Community Development Committees (LCDCs).

For further information, contact the Local Community Development Unit, Cork County Council on 021- 4285561 or 021-4285295 or email communitydevelopmentunit@corkcoco.ie

Picture: Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr Mary Linehan Foley.

The Mayor says; “This fund will support community and voluntary groups who are assisting a large number of vulnerable people to get through the current Covid 19 and in turn highlights the tremendous community spirit throughout our towns and villages.
See MoreSee Less

18/01/2021

Launch of €65,000 Covid 19 Emergency Fund for Cork County

Cork County Council is inviting applications from community and voluntary groups for funding under the Covid 19 Emergency Fund.

This is the third tranche of this scheme for Cork County, which is funded by the Department of Rural and Community Development and aims to provide a flexible and targeted approach to funding communities most in need.  Some examples of applications include;

Adapting services and operations to fit the new Covid 19 reality, e.g. allowing for changes to premises to provide for social distancing, funding for on-line activities and provision of critical social supports.
Assisting communities in their participation in the Government’s ‘Keep Well’ campaign which focusses on the themes of staying connected, switching off and being creative and minding your mood.
Support to Community and Voluntary groups involved in the Community Call.
Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr Mary Linehan Foley, is encouraging community groups to apply, “This fund will support community and voluntary groups who are assisting a large number of vulnerable people to get through the current Covid 19 and in turn highlights the tremendous community spirit throughout our towns and villages.”

Chief Executive of Cork County Council, Tim Lucey, went on to say, “Cork County Council is delighted to be able to add to the €116k already distributed to community and voluntary groups under the previous tranches and acknowledge that the past twelve months have been a difficult time for all,”

There are two types of grants available under the programme, grants up to a maximum of €1,000 and grants in excess of €1,000.   Applications can be made online at www.yourcouncil.ie Closing date for applications is Friday, 5th February at 4:00pm. All allocated monies will have to be spent by August 31st 2021.

The funding will be administered locally by Cork County Council’s Local Community Development Committees (LCDCs).

For further information, contact the Local Community Development Unit, Cork County Council on 021- 4285561 or 021-4285295 or email communitydevelopmentunit@corkcoco.ie

Picture: Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr Mary Linehan Foley.

The Mayor says; “This fund will support community and voluntary groups who are assisting a large number of vulnerable people to get through the current Covid 19 and in turn highlights the tremendous community spirit throughout our towns and villages.

4 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

MEMORIES OF THE YOUGHAL LITTLE THEATRE: Actors Billy Murphy, Tommy Curtin, Connie Hurley and Finbar Hannon performing on stage during a production by the Youghal Little Theatre Society.

The Youghal Little Theatre Society is synonymous with drama in East Cork and West Waterford. Have you any recollection of the little theatre or know what year or production this image is from. Please leave a comment below. Thanks to Mike Hackett for pictures.
Youghal Little Theatre
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MEMORIES OF THE YOUGHAL LITTLE THEATRE: Actors Billy Murphy, Tommy Curtin, Connie Hurley and Finbar Hannon performing on stage during a production by the Youghal Little Theatre Society.

The Youghal Little Theatre Society is synonymous with drama in East Cork and West Waterford. Have you any recollection of the little theatre or know what year or production this image is from. Please leave a comment below. Thanks to Mike Hackett for pictures.
Youghal Little TheatreImage attachment

Comment on Facebook

Fantastic Actors, All of them, Remember going with my Parents.

Must thank retired photographer Bob Rock for taking those pictures in the first place and then on his retirement – he entrusted them to me. Thank You Bob Rock. Mike Hackett.

Liz Murphy

Thank you so much.

Liz Murphy

Fond memories

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5 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

MEMORIES OF THE YOUGHAL LITTLE THEATRE: Actress Nuala Casey on stage with actors Finbar Hannon and Tommy Curtin. The Youghal Little Theatre Society is synonymous with drama in East Cork and West Waterford. Have you any recollection of the little theatre or know what year or production this image is from. Please leave a comment below. Thanks to Mike Hackett for picture. See MoreSee Less

MEMORIES OF THE YOUGHAL LITTLE THEATRE: Actress Nuala Casey on stage with actors Finbar Hannon and Tommy Curtin. The Youghal Little Theatre Society is synonymous with drama in East Cork and West Waterford. Have you any recollection of the little theatre or know what year or production this image is from. Please leave a comment below. Thanks to Mike Hackett for picture.

Comment on Facebook

My dad Paddy Cullinane was a member. In fact he spent his last night on this earth with the group, he suffered a heart attack on his way home from a play on the Thursday night and unfortunately died in the early hours of Friday 1st of May 1970 at the young age of 39 rest in peace dad 🙏

What memories ! My Dad Albert Cole was one of the founders of the Little Theatre and I recall many wonderful plays that were shown in Youghal .

Think this might be ‘Trap for a Lonely Man’ early 70’s – psychological thriller.

I remember going into the The Anchor Bar Youghal – O'Sullivan and being approached by Albert Cole, he was very drunk and tried to persuade me to buy a certain "girlie magazine!!'' I got really embarrassed as I never thought a man of his status would engage in such matters. I refused and eventually he went back to his friends. A short time later he returned and took the magazine out from the inside of his jacket. It was the Time magazine and he was as sober as a judge!! What a fantastic actor he was.

Isnt Tommy the image of Oliver Reid in this pic?

Nice people and loved the arts

Wow, that’s a great photo!

many happy memories

Finbar should know !!

Lysa Cattell Sarah Brosnan Fiona Curtin

m

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5 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

The wonderful sight of the whaling ship ‘Pequod’ sailing past the Youghal Lighthouse in the famous scene from the film ‘Moby Dick’ which was part filmed in Youghal, Co. Cork. (Click the GIF IMAGE to see the 5 second clip)
At the end of Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, the White Whale (Moby Dick) rams into the Pequod, sinking her and killing all aboard, except Ishmael. Ahab, the captain, also perishes when he gets tangled up in a harpoon line and is dragged out to sea.
The american director John Huston choose the town of Youghal as the whaling port for filming back in 1954.
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6 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

Youghal Community Health Project News:

Hi there, I’m a Community Health Worker in Youghal Community Health Project. We organised a walking challenge for two local community groups. They raised 1,420 euros for the Cardiac First Responders. More details below in the message. Would mind reporting news on your Facebook page.

I have some photos also Members of two local community groups, with support from Youghal Community Health Project, teamed up during November to take on a fundraising step challenge. Youghal Community Health Project’s Happy Feet Walking Group and Youghal’s Active Retirement Group set out to collectively take 4.9 million steps in a sponsored walking challenge, with all money raised going to local charity Youghal Cardiac First Responders. Youghal Cardiac First Responders work from an ‘on-call’ system which is set up if there is a cardiac emergency in the town of Youghal, the responders are sent as well as a HSE ambulance crew. CFRs can provide basic life support until such time that the HSE arrives.

The CFR group have already proven their worth in the town and are also involved in the maintenance and upkeep of the town’s defibrillators. Due to COVID-19 restrictions the two local community groups could not have their usual weekly walking meetups, therefore participants completed the challenge in their own time on their 5km radius walks.

As we all know walking is one of the most simple ways to maintain a healthy heart, reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke as well as supporting a healthy mind. The groups aimed to take 4.9 million steps – a step for every heart in Ireland.

The challenge participants were provided with walking packs to support them along the way. Each pack consisted of essential items to support them throughout the month. Pedometers, kindly donated by Cork Sports Partnership, were given to record their daily steps. Hi- Vis jackets and water bottles were kindly donated by Healthy Ireland and weekly check in motivational support was given by Youghal Community Health Project.

The steps have been counted it’s safe to say the groups smashed their targets by collectively achieving just short of 9 million steps which was double the original goal. Supported by the generosity of family and friends the group also raised a whopping 1,420 euros which will all go directly to The Cardiac First Responders. Both Youghal Community Health Project and The Youghal Cardiac First Responders would like to sincerely thank everyone who donated to the fundraiser, especially in these difficult times.

And last but not least, a massive thank you and well done to each participant for their commitment and motivation to the fundraising challenge.
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Youghal Community Health Project News:

Hi there, Im a Community Health Worker in Youghal Community Health Project. We organised a walking challenge for two local community groups. They raised 1,420 euros for the Cardiac First Responders. More details below in the message. Would mind reporting news on your Facebook page.

I have some photos also Members of two local community groups, with support from Youghal Community Health Project, teamed up during November to take on a fundraising step challenge. Youghal Community Health Project’s Happy Feet Walking Group and Youghal’s Active Retirement Group set out to collectively take 4.9 million steps in a sponsored walking challenge, with all money raised going to local charity Youghal Cardiac First Responders. Youghal Cardiac First Responders work from an on-call system which is set up if there is a cardiac emergency in the town of Youghal, the responders are sent as well as a HSE ambulance crew. CFRs can provide basic life support until such time that the HSE arrives.

The CFR group have already proven their worth in the town and are also involved in the maintenance and upkeep of the towns defibrillators. Due to COVID-19 restrictions the two local community groups could not have their usual weekly walking meetups, therefore participants completed the challenge in their own time on their 5km radius walks.

As we all know walking is one of the most simple ways to maintain a healthy heart, reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke as well as supporting a healthy mind. The groups aimed to take 4.9 million steps – a step for every heart in Ireland.

The challenge participants were provided with walking packs to support them along the way. Each pack consisted of essential items to support them throughout the month. Pedometers, kindly donated by Cork Sports Partnership, were given to record their daily steps. Hi- Vis jackets and water bottles were kindly donated by Healthy Ireland and weekly check in motivational support was given by Youghal Community Health Project.

The steps have been counted its safe to say the groups smashed their targets by collectively achieving just short of 9 million steps which was double the original goal. Supported by the generosity of family and friends the group also raised a whopping 1,420 euros which will all go directly to The Cardiac First Responders. Both Youghal Community Health Project and The Youghal Cardiac First Responders would like to sincerely thank everyone who donated to the fundraiser, especially in these difficult times.

And last but not least, a massive thank you and well done to each participant for their commitment and motivation to the fundraising challenge.

6 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

Threshing long ago

When Michael Fitzgerald – – an Irish Army officer and a native of Clashmore in West-Waterford – – retired – – he kindly wrote a piece for me about his memories of threshing long ago.

Incidentally, he was married to a woman from Cork, Noreen, and she was an opera singer who had often sung in the old Cork Opera House. This is a great historical record of the threshing era and is a great credit and a fond memory of Michael.
Here it is in his own words.
“I had left my native place in 1940 – – when Europe was in turmoil having been overrun Hitler. Then returning – – after more than fifty years away – – I began to notice the changes. Driving up Kilgabriel – – sadly our old house was long gone – – the place was deserted – – but I still climbed to the top of the ‘high field’ – – as it was known to us. My brothers and I spent many happy hours up there – – playing all sorts of games – – but that was seventy years ago.

Standing at the top of the ‘high field’ – – one can see about eighty per-cent of the Clashmore/Piltown Parish. My thoughts were now back in the 1920s – – but not for long because my dreams were interupted by an object that I observed away in the distance. It was a big yellow-coloured combine-harvester devouring a field of ripe corn. It was cutting, threshing and winnowing – – all in one go – – and was so fast at it.


In my childhood days – – that field of corn would have been harvested by horse-power – – two horses pulling a mowing machine that had two seats. One was for the driver and the other – – mounted over the right wheel – – was for the sheaf-maker. He was the operator who measured out and constructed the sheaves which were then bound and tied by the binders. Women were very adept at this task. Firstly, the double-binder was made by manipulating a fist-full of corn stalks – – wrapping them around the bundles and making a tightly bound sheaf. This was then tossed aside for the youngsters (us) to stand them up and form the stooks. A stook usually consisted of from four to six sheaves – – depending on the ripeness and moisture content. It was a slow and laborious but everybody enjoyed it. Next came the stacking – – usually after two weeks. This was another art and good stack makers were in great demand at harvest time. After a few days – – when the weather was suitable – – the horse was called on again to perform his next task – – the drawing home. Then on reaching the haggard – – the corn was built into ricks – – ready for the big day of the threshing.

The first threshing machine that I knew as a youngster was also horse-driven and consisted of two units. One was a big circular devise which we called the ‘boiler’ and three long beams protruded from the top and two horses were yoked to each beam. As the horses moved around in an anti-clockwise direction – – this machine, via a series of cogged wheel movements – – turned the big spindle which reached out as far as the drum. The same spindle also drove another set of cogged wheels which drove the thrasher. Sheaves of corn were cut and passed on the feeder – – another skilled operator. Every resulting task was dependent on him. The grain and straw came out at the other end of the thresher and the straw was piked along by a chain of workers to where the straw rick was made. Again more experienced men were required for this task.

The grain – – complete with chaff – – was shovelled and brushed along to the barn – – just a few yards from the drum. It was stored here for awhile to await the winnowing. This was another cumbersome task by a machine and was operated manually. The first men to operate horse-drawn machine threshers that I remember were the five Cunningham brothers from Kilgabriel.
Threshing was the most important day on the farm. It was also very romantic and enjoyable. Even though it took a large work-force – – the beauty was that the question of payment never entered into it. It was too honourable a deed for that. All the neighbours turned up to give of their services freely and only one threshing took place in an area on any given day. Then the threshing dinner was usually home-cured bacon, spuds and cabbage – – and plenty of it. In the afternoon a supply of porter would be brought out for the hard-working men – – before the evening saw the commencement of the threshing dance.
It was tough going for man and horse during those weeks and the poor animals working the ‘boiler’ got tired as the day wore on. They had to be urged on by the driver who was usually seated on top of the apparatus. One memory I cherish is of a popular – – the late Willie Kelleher from Lickey. Willie never used a whip or rod but instead brought a handful of gravel and pinged the horse in the ear to wake him up.


Towards the end of the 1920s – – the horse thresher was replaced by the steam thresher. It thrashed and winnowed all in one go. Cumbersome as this was – – it did a great job. Still a large workforce was needed like sheaf tossers, cutters, feeders, straw pickers, rick makers and a new operatin ; grain baggers. There were four grain exits at the back of the thresher and spillage had to be avoided. I remember the late Tom Roche –a survivor of ‘Mons’. Tom controlled the bagging team and never spilled a grain.
We loved to watch those big machines operating on our way to Ballycurranew school in the morning – – and if we had any doubts about the location – – we would listen for the whistle that signalled the start of the day’s work.


The steam thresher became redundant in the late 1930s and was replaced by the tractor. Now the task was made simpler again by the simpler ‘Ransome’- – more lighter and more efficient. The first tractor remembered was owned by Hugh McGrath of Ballyheeney and then came the McSweeney brothers from Bantry. My Brother Padraigh Fitzgerald was a teacher in Bantry and told Ted that there was lots of work for him In Waterford. Ted arrived and got more than work because he ended up marrying Bridie Noonan from Newport and his right-hand man – – Denis Calnan – – married her sister Kate. Happy settlement for the West-Cork men.
There was a humerous side to the threshings as well. When the weather was threatening – – the engine would be stepped up a gear and everybody had to work quicker and harder in double-time. Some of the hardier men could cope – – but there were those who didn’t relish the slave-driving tactics. Then to gain some respite – – a signal was sent to the man up top and he would put an uncut sheaf into the system – -thereby jamming the works and stopping the machine. The ten minutes that it took to clear it gave the men a chance to draw their breath and have a smoke. As for us young fellows – – it was our first chance to get the pull of the butt of a fag – and the first taste of a swig of porter. “Ah Awful” could be heard. This was all done behind the straw rick.


Another bit of fun was had with the field mice found at the centre of the fast-disappearing rick. The chase began and we collected as many mice as we could. Then we tied the sleeves of the hanging coats before deposing a few mice into the cavities. Gleefully we peeped from around the corner as a victim tried to put on his coat. The more he pushed into the sleeve – – the more mice jumped out. Great excitement and laughter for us – – but not all the victims saw the joke and sometimes we had to run away quickly to avoid a slap in the ear.


Now time has passed quickly while I was dreaming of long ago at the top of the ‘high field’. Glancing around I noticed that the yellow combine has finished its work in the big field and moved on to devour another field of corn before nightfall. When I recovered from my musings – – I drove back down to the village of Clashmore and entered the ‘Decies’ bar for a pint of stout. The company consisted mainly of young people and I didn’t know anybody. I wondered if they knew me – – or was I now a stranger in my own place? There wasn’t a soul to tell my memories to. Nobody in this youthful gathering would understand the progress that we had made in the last seventy years. Still – – I was glad for them – – they would never have to work as hard as we did.
And now finally – – to quote from that poem ‘The Old House’ – – “It’s time I moved on” – – Written by Captain Michael Fitzgerald in 1998.
Mike Hackett.
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Threshing long ago

When Michael Fitzgerald  - - an Irish Army officer and a native of Clashmore in West-Waterford  - - retired  - - he kindly wrote a piece for me about his memories of threshing long ago.

Incidentally, he was married to a woman from Cork, Noreen, and she was an opera singer who had often sung in the old Cork Opera House.  This is a great historical record of the threshing era and is a great credit and a fond memory of Michael.  
Here it is in his own words.
 “I had left my native place in 1940 - - when Europe was in turmoil having been overrun Hitler.  Then returning - - after more than fifty years away - - I began to notice the changes.  Driving up Kilgabriel - - sadly our old house was long gone - - the place was deserted - - but I still climbed to the top of the ‘high field’ - - as it was known to us.  My brothers and I spent many happy hours up there - - playing all sorts of games  - - but that was seventy years ago.  

Standing at the top of the ‘high field’ - - one can see about eighty per-cent of the Clashmore/Piltown Parish.  My thoughts were now back in the 1920s  - - but not for long because my dreams were interupted by an object that I observed away in the distance.  It was a big yellow-coloured combine-harvester  devouring a field of ripe corn.  It was cutting, threshing and winnowing - - all in one go - - and was so fast at it.

  
In my childhood days - - that field of corn would have been harvested by horse-power - - two horses pulling a mowing machine that had two seats.  One was for the driver and the other - - mounted over the right wheel - - was for the sheaf-maker.  He was the operator who measured out and constructed the sheaves which were then bound and tied by the binders.  Women were very adept at this task.   Firstly, the double-binder was made by manipulating a fist-full of corn stalks - - wrapping them around the bundles and making a tightly bound sheaf.  This was then tossed aside for the youngsters (us) to stand them up and form the stooks.  A stook usually consisted of from four to six sheaves - - depending on the ripeness and moisture content.  It was a slow and laborious but everybody enjoyed it.  Next came the stacking - - usually after two weeks.  This was another art and good stack makers were in great demand at harvest time.  After a few days - - when the weather was suitable - - the horse was called on again to perform his next task - - the drawing home.  Then on reaching the haggard - - the corn was built into ricks - - ready for the big day of the threshing.

The first threshing machine that I knew as a youngster was also horse-driven and consisted of two units.  One was a big circular devise which we called the ‘boiler’ and three long beams protruded from the top and two horses were yoked to each beam.  As the horses moved around in an anti-clockwise direction - - this machine, via a series of cogged wheel movements - - turned the big spindle which reached out as far as the drum.  The same spindle also drove another set of cogged wheels which drove the thrasher.  Sheaves of corn were cut and passed on the feeder - - another skilled operator.  Every resulting task was dependent on him.  The grain and straw came out at the other end of the thresher and the straw was piked along by a chain of workers to where the straw rick was made.  Again more experienced men were required for this task.

The grain - - complete with chaff - - was shovelled and brushed along to the barn - - just a few yards from the drum.  It was stored here for awhile to await the winnowing.  This was another cumbersome task by a machine and was operated manually.  The first men to operate horse-drawn machine threshers that I remember were the five Cunningham brothers from Kilgabriel.  
Threshing was the most important day on the farm.  It was also very romantic and enjoyable.  Even though it took a large work-force - - the beauty was that the question of payment never entered into it.  It was too honourable a deed for that.  All the neighbours turned up to give of their services freely and only one threshing took place in an area on any given day.  Then the threshing dinner was usually home-cured bacon, spuds and cabbage - - and plenty of it.  In the afternoon a supply of porter would be brought out for the hard-working men - - before the evening saw the commencement of the threshing dance.  
It was tough going for man and horse during those weeks and the poor animals working the ‘boiler’ got tired as the day wore on.  They had to be urged on by the driver who was usually seated on top of the apparatus.  One memory I cherish is of a popular - - the late Willie Kelleher from Lickey.  Willie never used a whip or rod but instead brought a handful of gravel and pinged the horse in the ear to wake him up.

 
Towards the end of the 1920s - - the horse thresher was replaced by the steam thresher.  It thrashed and winnowed all in one go.  Cumbersome as this was - - it did a great job.  Still  a large workforce was needed like sheaf tossers, cutters, feeders, straw pickers, rick makers and a new operatin ; grain baggers.  There were four grain exits at the back of the thresher and spillage had to be avoided.  I remember the late Tom Roche –a survivor of ‘Mons’.  Tom controlled the bagging team and never spilled a grain.  
We loved to watch those big machines operating on our way to Ballycurranew school in the morning - - and if we had any doubts about the location - - we would listen for the whistle that signalled the start of the day’s work.

 
The steam thresher became redundant in the late 1930s and was replaced by the tractor.  Now the task was made simpler again by the simpler ‘Ransome’- - more lighter and more efficient.  The first tractor remembered was owned by Hugh McGrath of Ballyheeney and then came the McSweeney brothers from Bantry.  My Brother Padraigh Fitzgerald was a teacher in Bantry and told Ted that there was lots of work for him In Waterford.  Ted arrived and got more than work because he ended up marrying Bridie Noonan from Newport and his right-hand man - - Denis Calnan - - married her sister Kate.  Happy settlement for the West-Cork men.  
There was a humerous side to the threshings as well.  When the weather was threatening - - the engine would be stepped up a gear and everybody had to work quicker and harder in double-time.  Some of the hardier men could cope - - but there were those who didn’t relish the slave-driving tactics.  Then to gain some respite - - a signal was sent to the man up top and he would put an uncut sheaf into the system - -thereby jamming the works and stopping the machine.  The ten minutes that it took to clear it gave the men a chance to draw their breath and have a smoke.  As for us young fellows - - it was our first chance to get the pull of the butt of a fag – and the first taste of a swig of porter.  “Ah Awful” could be heard.  This was all done behind the straw rick.

  
Another bit of fun was had with the field mice found at the centre of the fast-disappearing rick.  The chase began and we collected as many mice as we could.  Then we tied the sleeves of the hanging coats before deposing a few mice into the cavities.  Gleefully we peeped from around the corner as a victim tried to put on his coat.  The more he pushed into the sleeve - - the more mice jumped out.  Great excitement and laughter for us - - but not all the victims saw the joke and sometimes we had to run away quickly to avoid a slap in the ear.

  
Now time has passed quickly while I was dreaming of long ago at the top of the ‘high field’.  Glancing around I noticed that the yellow combine has finished its work in the big field and moved on to devour another field of corn before nightfall.  When I recovered from my musings - - I drove back down to the village of Clashmore and entered the ‘Decies’ bar for a pint of stout.  The company consisted mainly of young people and I didn’t know anybody.  I wondered if they knew me - - or was I now a stranger in my own place?  There wasn’t  a soul to tell my memories to.  Nobody in this youthful gathering would understand the progress that we had made in the last seventy years.  Still - - I was glad for them - - they would never have to work as hard as we did.  
And now finally - - to quote from that poem ‘The Old House’ - - “It’s time I moved on”   - - Written by Captain Michael Fitzgerald in 1998. 
Mike Hackett.

Comment on Facebook

Lovely story and memories. Progress in one way but such a loss of skill, enjoyment and community purpose!

I remember my mum talking about the threshing when she was young, what a brilliant piece this is 😀

Very interesting & informative.

A beautifully written memory. Thanks for sharing 🦋🙏🌷

Mary Roche Cally Leahy nice bit about Kilgabriel. Tom Roche gets a mention.

Niamh Roche

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1 week ago

YoughalOnline.com

Scene from the film Moby Dick filmed in Youghal 1954.

Mrs Twomey, from Lower Cork Hill can be seen on the left wearing the traditional shawl in this clip filmed on the pier head as the women gather at the quayside to say goodbye to the whaling ship the ‘Pequod’ and crew as it sets sail from the inner habour out into the open sea in search of the great white whale Moby Dick.
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Comment on Facebook

I don't think that's Mrs Buttimer! It's her mother, Mrs Twomey, from Lr Cork Hill.

Mary Carson

Brilliant

1 week ago

YoughalOnline.com

THE AMINGOS. By Kay Cronin – Donnelly

My Father, Andrew Cronin was born on Tallow Street Youghal on 22nd Oct. 1910 into a large family. Many of his brothers and sisters emigrated but Andrew got a job as a messenger boy at Keniry’s Hardware Store which was at the bottom of Cork Hill where Sweetnam’s was many years later..
In our family photo-album there are several photos of me balancing on my father’s shoulders, arms outstretched. Each time I see these photos it brings back memories of the many times I listened to him telling stories of when himself and his friends formed an acting and gymnastic troupe called “ THE AMINGOS.” Sadly, there are none of the troupe still alive, but there are still people around the town of Youghal that had fathers and grandfathers in the group.

My father, never stopped talking about that exciting time of his life when “putting on a show” was the main focus of how he and his friends spent their spare time. The Amingos had its origins in a group of young men whose pastime was practising gymnastics and balancing tricks. It gradually grew to include a small number of females so they could incorporate one act plays into their show.
This love of acrobatics came about because Duffy’s Circus and Fossett’s Circus and the travelling “Fit -Ups” were a big part of their life. Most of them lived at the north end of the town where the “Paddock” and “ Dunne’s Park” provided halting sites for the travelling shows. My father and his friends never missed a Circus and never went to school when the Circus came to town.
From the day the posters went up around town, they scrutinised the programme and speculated as to what daring new acts would be arriving to thrill the public. Then, very early in the morning on the expected day, a “lookout” would be sent out the Slob Bank where there was a good view of the Waterford road across the River Blackwater. When the first wagons were spotted wending their way from their last performance in Dungarvan, the alert went out and by the time they had reached Youghal Bridge, they would have a sizeable group ready to escort them into town. The first job was to put up the Big Top. This involved not only the circus hands but everyone big enough to pull a rope. The animals also had to be watered and willing hands filled buckets from the local fountain in the hope of getting a free pass to the matinee. Even the housewives who lived nearby helped out by washing clothes for the clowns who always seemed to be bachelors.

Once the Tent was up the equipment belonging to the trapeze artists was the next priority so they could practise their routine. My father and his friends sneaked into the tent and lay on their bellies in the grass under the timber seats in order to get a preview of their acts. Along with the trapeze you had “Tumblers” and the “Tight Rope” and the “Slack Wire”. The budding “Amingos” drank in every manoeuvre and went off to practise the stunts while they were fresh in their minds sometimes down the Slob Bank or in Paddy Maher’s field. Well “practice led to perfect” and before long they were ready to put on a public performance. They made their own tent out of old flour bags sewn together and some poles. Their performance got such a good reception in Youghal that they hired a horse and cart and took the show to Gortroe and Ardmore.
They went in for publicity in a big way getting posters and programmes printed at Fields Printers. These posters were bright and colourful just like circus posters with bold primary colours. They fascinated me as a young child and I often took them out of the drawer on a rainy day to pour over the different acts. One day I asked my father why I could not see his name on the posters. He laughed and pointed “Thats it there, WERDNA NINORC , my stage name, Andrew Cronin spelled backwards”. Many others in the troupe had nicknames and I soon got quite used to hearing names like “Waddle Sheehan” “Rashers Keefe” and “Gotcha Mahony”.
As the troupe improved in their acrobatic and acting skills they ventured to stage shows in the Mall House in Youghal and even went as far as Dungarvan! Their programme for the Town Hall Dungarvan makes one wonder at the versatility of such a small group of people.
“John O’Keefe presents the Amingos Acrobats in 45 Grand Acrobatic Pyramids, performed on Chairs and Pedestal Ladders” and that was only for starters because it also advises that, “Several others perform Hair-Raising feats of Backward and Forward Somersalting, Handbalancing, Tumbling, Body Contortions and Juggling along with Songs,Dances,Monologues, Comedy, etc. etc.” My father was a great fan of Houdini so it is no surprise to see him described on the programme as “The Wizard of Escapology”.
The audience were invited to “see him make his sensational escape from a box after being securely tied by the audience”. To make this even more interesting “Any local gentleman who will go into the box and make his escape from it, can have £10”. Jack Twomey is credited with doing a Monologue “The Gift of Hung Lung Fay” while Tommy (Bomb) Roche performed a “Unique Dance with the Tambourine”.
When it came to describing acts, the troupe were not wanting in using a vocabulary which would be at home in the English show “The Town Hall Tonight”. For instance, Messrs. Cronin and Sheehan are described as being “ Equilibrist Jugglers using Manipulating Dexterity” and Messrs. Mahony and Coakley are given the title of “Equilibrists Extraordinary”. The programme also makes it clear that The Amingos did not want any other group copying their stunts by stating that,“The Acrobatic Pyramids performed in this show are the sole property of the Amingo Acrobats being entirely thought out by them and rearranged and brought to perfection by the manager”.
But the Amigos was not all serious work. There was room for camaraderie and fun also and they loved playing tricks on one another. Before the Drama Sketch one night, which involved the man going down on one knee to profess his love for the handsome maiden, someone got the idea to loosen the floorboard right in front of the chair where the maiden was seated. You can just picture the result, down goes the knee and up comes the floorboard to hit him right in the face much to the hilarity of the audience and his friends. Another story that my father loved to tell, referred to a night in Ardmore when the height of the tent was lower than normal. When he got up to walk on the Tight Rope with an umbrella in his hand, he discovered that because the tip of the umbrella touched the roof, he was able to do all sort of movements normally impossible.
So what became of this talented group? Many of the troupe went to sea like my father or took up a trade like John “Rashers” Keefe who became a plumber. Frederick Barber, who was their treasurer, spent many years travelling with the Circus. My father’s cousin, Bernard Cronin toured with both Duffy’s and Fossett’s Circus. On the 28th of May 1930 Bernard signed a contract with John Duffy “to perform, go in parades, and make self generally useful” for the salary of £3 per week, which was good in those days. When he later went to Fossetts in 1933 to do “Hand Balancing, and Tumbling” he got £4-10-0 with sleeping accommodation provided.
Those who got married and had children passed on some of the adventure and magic they had experienced. My young life was filled with card tricks and tricks with rings that intertwined and came apart and much more. When members of the Amingos met, their conversation eventually turned back to their troupe and they could spend hours talking about their many escapades. Walking down the Quay one day with my father we met a comrade. They talked about the fishing and the ships coming in and then he pointed over to the Pier Head “Andrew, do you remember the day we tied you up and put you in a coffin and dumped you into the water. Boy was i glad when I saw you coming to the surface a few minutes later. You were always trying to do Houdini.”
There are many people in Youghal today who had someone in the Amingos. They, like me marvel at what a group of young men achieved at a time when there were no grants or handouts for the Arts. Their love of the Circus and their efforts to emulate the daring acts they witnessed, was the impetus for them to form that unique troupe called “The Amingos” whose members never lost the touch of magic and mystique. In their eyes, they were “The Greatest Show on Earth”.

In later years he joined the merchant navy and sailed to various destinations. When he left the sea, he worked at Murray Cabinets and transferred to Youghal Carpets when it opened. He was a founder member of the Youghal Brass and Reed Band, a member of the first Parish Council, and involved in setting up the first school buses. He had just retired when he died unexpectedly from a heart attack in 1977 at the age of 67.

Sometimes, on winter evenings whenI am looking into the fire, I remember the many tales he told of faraway places, mermaids and Sacred Cows. His greatest gift to me was that Magic does exist and that the world if full of Wonder.

Pictures:

The Names of the Amingos
Back Row: Paddy Coakley, Tommy (Gotcha) O’Mahony, John O’Keeffe, Dinny Kelleher, Danny (Waddle Sheehan, Joe Sullivan and Tommy (Bomb) Roche.
Front Row: Fred Barber, Adeline Barber, Lily Troy, Lily Jones, Eily Bland, Babe, Bernard and Andrew Cronin.

– Andrew with his daughter Kay on his shoulders

– Amingos Concert Bill for Dungarvan Town Hall

– Amingos Variety Show

– Amingos List of Talent

– Andrew Cronin on the Slack Wire

Back Row Bunny Roche, Jack Twomey, Paddy Coakley – – Front Row Andrew Cronin, Danny (Waddle) Sheehan, John O’Keeffe and Tommy (Gotcha) O’Mahony..
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the poster that john lennon bought in an old shop which gave rise to the lennon /mccarthney song ''for the benefit of mister kite 'about a circus in the 1800's is rumoured to have originated in Youghal

Kay ,,a fantastic tale and great information,Your Dad Andrew was the FOUNDER of ST MARYS BRASS AND REED BAND ,the work he done was out of this world ,he was a fantastic organizer, and done so much to promote the band.He will always be remembered and respected as a true GENTLEMAN and friend ,, Thanks again KAY , GOD BLESS .

Great read, was that the same dinny keefe that worked for joe buckley in the wimpy

So enjoyable to read Kay very well written. My uncle was Tommy(bomb)Roche, my Mam told us a story about how Tommy ran away with the circus and my grandad, had to go find him on his bicycle and bring him back home to Youghal.

Great read Kay, as usual, well written and you always have a great way of telling stories. 🙏

Yes, that was a wonderful memoir. Well done.

What a great legacy, thanks for sharing your story.

A great read – Danny “Waddle” Sheehan was my grand-uncle.

Thank you for sharing memories 🎆 and photographs 🎆💙👏🙏

Thank you, Kay. Mam told us a bit of this but you have filled in many gaps. Your Dad was so young when he died. The article is great. Much more, please. Or how about a book?

Great story Kay I see my uncle Jack Twomey standing in the middle back row.

Weren't they great people so enterprising and talented. What a great description you gave. Great memories 👍👏🤡🎪🎈🃏

A wonderful story..

Very interesting / amazing. Well written & enjoyable to read, thank you Kay.

Thank you for sharing this wonderful story.

What a fabulous read, thank you 🙏

Beautifully written Kay – I so enjoyed you telling me about your Father and the Amingos!!

Lovely memories Kay of a very special time in your life.

What a fabulous story and thank you for sharing all your wonderful memories.

That is so fantastic Kay. Thanks for sharing

Very interesting Kay thanks for sharing.

Jamie Frahill, please can you show this to Jimmy and Mary. X

Really enjoyed your story and wonderful photos. Thank you Kay Cronin- Kennedy!

Incredible story.

Excellent Story Kay. Thank You.

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2 weeks ago

YoughalOnline.com

Archive Photo: Thanks to Sandra Murphy Kiely who sent in this archive photo of the League of the Cross band – Youghal. The League of the Cross was once located at Catherine Street where the Cumann Na Daoine centre is now. In the 20th century the town was privileged to have several bands from Pipe bands to Brass & Reed bands, Ceile bands to full orchestras. This wonderful photo shows the League of the Cross Brass & Reed band in a time well before the Youghal Brass and Reed band of the 1970s era – now unfortunately defunct.

The League of the Cross was a Roman Catholic total abstinence confraternity, founded in London in 1873 by Cardinal Manning. Its aim was to unite Catholics, both clergy and laity, in the warfare against intemperance; and thus to improve religious, social, and domestic conditions. The original and chief centres of the League were London and Liverpool. Branches were organized in various cities of Great Britain and Ireland, and in Australia.

Sandra says; "Hello I was asked by an uncle in the states if I could send on the following picture of the League of the Cross band. Back in the day! The man with full head of black hair top right corner is my grandad Jimmy Murphy of 1 strand street. I’m sure others can name a few more. Thanking you. (Jimmy would be a father to the well known Barty, Patrick, Jim, Michael, Joe, Carmel and the late Ollie)

Do you recognise a few of the well known faces here. Jimmy Murphy of Strand street is shown with the arrow pointing at him. Please leave your answer in the comment box below.
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Archive Photo: Thanks to Sandra Murphy Kiely who sent in this archive photo of the League of the Cross band - Youghal. The League of the Cross was once located at Catherine Street where the Cumann Na Daoine centre is now. In the 20th century the town was privileged to have several bands from Pipe bands to Brass & Reed bands, Ceile bands to full orchestras. This wonderful photo shows the League of the Cross Brass & Reed band in a time well before the Youghal Brass and Reed band of the 1970s era - now unfortunately defunct.

The League of the Cross was a Roman Catholic total abstinence confraternity, founded in London in 1873 by Cardinal Manning. Its aim was to unite Catholics, both clergy and laity, in the warfare against intemperance; and thus to improve religious, social, and domestic conditions. The original and chief centres of the League were London and Liverpool. Branches were organized in various cities of Great Britain and Ireland, and in Australia.

Sandra says; Hello I was asked by an uncle in the states if I could send on the following picture of the League of the Cross band. Back in the day! The man with full head of black hair top right corner is my grandad Jimmy Murphy of 1 strand street. I’m sure others can name a few more. Thanking you. (Jimmy would be a father to the well known Barty, Patrick, Jim, Michael, Joe, Carmel and the late Ollie)

Do you recognise a few of the well known faces here. Jimmy Murphy of Strand street is shown with the arrow pointing at him. Please leave your answer in the comment box below.

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I think the man on the right hand side in the back row could be Willie Walsh from I think windmill hill

I do Know My Late Dad (Micky Roche) often spoke about The League of The Cross Band

Jim sold me my first motorcycle insurance back in the day!!! And Michael T my last in Youghal!!

I am with Micneal T for over 40 years one of a few

Patrick Murphy

Pat. Clancy. The man on the extreme right, in rain coat, is my late father,Edward,Ned, Clancy.He was President of The League of the Cross. He lived in Meat Shambles Lane. I have another photo of the Band in my possesion.

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2 weeks ago

YoughalOnline.com

Youghal Beach – County Cork – 3rd January 2021: Walkers enjoying a beautiful sunset at the front strand in Youghal as cold but sunny weather is forecast for the next few days. See MoreSee Less

Youghal Beach - County Cork - 3rd January 2021: Walkers enjoying a beautiful sunset at the front strand in Youghal as cold but sunny weather is forecast for the next few days.

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Fabulous picture Mick …. 👍🏻

2 weeks ago

YoughalOnline.com

Found a pair of Apple Earpods in Youghal. Please message this facebook page with details for safe return. See MoreSee Less

Found a pair of Apple Earpods in Youghal. Please message this facebook page with details for safe return.
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