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8 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED TO HONOUR YOUGHAL TITANIC HERO
Two Youghal maritime history enthusiasts have launched a fundraising campaign to honour a local seaman who helped to save up to 50 people on the Titanic.

Kevin Melly and Peter Landers have already received permission to erect a plaque to John (Jack) Foley, whose place in history has gone unrecognised in his hometown.

Born in Muckridge near Youghal in 1865, Jack’s family moved to Tallow Street in the town when he was a child.

He married Kinsale girl Mary ‘Minnie’ Murphy in 1894 and the couple subsequently moved to Kinsale, where the first five of their seven children were born.

They left Kinsale for Southampton circa 1907 and Jack signed on to Titanic as a quartermaster in Belfast in March 1912.

“He signed on to the ship again on April 6th as a storekeeper”, says Kevin, who was first learned from Jack’s Youghal connection over 50 years ago by Youghal man Liam Mulcahy, who was the sailor’s grandnephew.
“I think he was sometimes registered as from York, due to administrators misinterpreting his accent”, Kevin reflects. “I never forgot the connection but only began researching it in recent years”.

Kevin acquired a copy of Jack’s birth certificate and contacted groups like the British Titanic Society and parties associated with Titanic in Cobh.

He discovered that after the ship hit an iceberg on April 15th, Jack was instrumental in launching lifeboats.

He and colleague Samuel Hemming worked particularly on getting lifeboat 4 flush with A-deck and used an axe to chop a sounding spar (pole used to measure depth) that was inhibiting the launch.

“Jack was placed in charge of lifeboat 4 and soon afterwards helped pull Hemming from the sea”, says Kevin.
“Hemming later reported that under Jack the boat plucked seven more crew from sea that night and rescued four more people from an upturned boat after dawn broke”.

In July 1912 Jack signed on the Oceanic but failed to show for the sailing.

Minnie died in 1922, aged 52 and Jack suffered a fatal stroke in 1934, leaving just €180 in his estate. He was buried in an unmarked grave at Southampton’s Hollybrook Cemetery.

Kevin and Peter have now launched a GoFundMe page to raise €1,900 for a plaque to honour Jack, which will be erected at Market Square, Youghal. See www.gofundme.com/f/plaque-for-jack

Story by Christy Parker – Courtesy of The County, Irish Examiner

Image: RMS Titanic departing Southampton on 10th April 1912 – Picture inset: Youghal seaman John (Jack) Foley
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CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED TO HONOUR YOUGHAL TITANIC HERO
Two Youghal maritime history enthusiasts have launched a fundraising campaign to honour a local seaman who helped to save up to 50 people on the Titanic.

Kevin Melly and Peter Landers have already received permission to erect a plaque to John (Jack) Foley, whose place in history has gone unrecognised in his hometown. 

Born in Muckridge near Youghal in 1865, Jack’s family moved to Tallow Street in the town when he was a child. 

He married Kinsale girl Mary ‘Minnie’ Murphy in 1894 and the couple subsequently moved to Kinsale, where the first five of their seven children were born.  

They left Kinsale for Southampton circa 1907 and Jack signed on to Titanic as a quartermaster in Belfast in March 1912. 

“He signed on to the ship again on April 6th as a storekeeper”, says Kevin, who was first learned from Jack’s Youghal connection over 50 years ago by Youghal man Liam Mulcahy, who was the sailor’s grandnephew. 
“I think he was sometimes registered as from York, due to administrators misinterpreting his accent”, Kevin reflects. “I never forgot the connection but only began researching it in recent years”. 

Kevin acquired a copy of Jack’s birth certificate and contacted groups like the British Titanic Society and parties associated with Titanic in Cobh.  

He discovered that after the ship hit an iceberg on April 15th, Jack was instrumental in launching lifeboats. 

He and colleague Samuel Hemming worked particularly on getting lifeboat 4 flush with A-deck and used an axe to chop a sounding spar (pole used to measure depth) that was inhibiting the launch. 

“Jack was placed in charge of lifeboat 4 and soon afterwards helped pull Hemming from the sea”, says Kevin. 
“Hemming later reported that under Jack the boat plucked seven more crew from sea that night and rescued four more people from an upturned boat after dawn broke”. 

In July 1912 Jack signed on the Oceanic but failed to show for the sailing. 

Minnie died in 1922, aged 52 and Jack suffered a fatal stroke in 1934, leaving just €180 in his estate. He was buried in an unmarked grave at Southampton’s Hollybrook Cemetery.

Kevin and Peter have now launched a GoFundMe page to raise €1,900 for a plaque to honour Jack, which will be erected at Market Square, Youghal. See https://www.gofundme.com/f/plaque-for-jack

Story by Christy Parker - Courtesy of The County, Irish Examiner

Image: RMS Titanic departing Southampton on 10th April 1912 - Picture inset: Youghal seaman John (Jack) Foley

11 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR THE PEOPLE OF YOUGHAL AND SURROUNDING AREAS.
Youghal News Facebook page is currently compiling a list of local businesses that are open, offering a takeaway or delivery service or are trading online. Please respond if your business is in one of these categories and we will try to produce an updated list this afternoon.

Don’t worry if we miss your business on the first draft as we intend to have a daily update and hopefully with everyone’s help we will have a full list in a few days.

Please visit or contact the Youghal News Facebook and leave your details there and PLEASE SUPPORT LOCAL.

Visit Youghal News Facebook here: Youghal NewsCllr Mary Linehan FoleyYoughal.ieCorks RedFM 104-106Cork County CouncilCork’s 96FMC103 CorkYoughalOnline.comAura Youghal Leisure CentreCry YoughalEast CorkCork AirportCork Safety AlertsCork BeoPerks Family Entertainment CentreRTÉ OneRTÉ NewsRTÉ 2fmToday FMAherne’s Seafood Restaurant and Townhouse YoughalQuality Hotel Youghal CorkCliff House HotelCastlemartyr ResortIrish ExaminerEchoLive.ie
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IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR THE PEOPLE OF YOUGHAL AND SURROUNDING AREAS.
Youghal News Facebook page is currently compiling a list of local businesses that are open, offering a takeaway or delivery service or are trading online. Please respond if your business is in one of these categories and we will try to produce an updated list this afternoon.

Dont worry if we miss your business on the first draft as we intend to have a daily update and hopefully with everyones help we will have a full list in a few days.

Please visit or contact the Youghal News Facebook and leave your details there and PLEASE SUPPORT LOCAL.

Visit Youghal News Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/youghalnews/

Comment on Facebook

Any hardwear shop open?

Brodericks open for emergencys only

Rosarii

15 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

The Fever Hospital in Youghal: Did you know that there was once a hospital in Youghal known as the ‘Fever Hospital’. It was located on Raheen road near the town wall tower. The objectives of the hospital were to care for the diseased in the town and prevent the spread of infection in the homes of the poor. The hospital admitted fever patients who had contagious diseases like Scarlet Fever, Typhus epidemics (after the Irish Famine) Diphtheria, and other diseases.

In this picture, you can see the rear view of The Fever Hospital as seen from the grounds of St Mary’s Collegiate Church Youghal, ( Photo by Mikey Roche) and picture inset the map ( Historic map 1888 to 1913) showing the location of The Fever Hospital on Raheen Road (Now a carpark next to the town wall tower)

*In Victorian times the viewing platform at Moll Goggin’s Corner in Youghal was well known as a place to relax and that the sea had a calming influence on people as well as health benefits when recuperating. Unfortunately, this place is closed off now to the public for safety reasons due to structural damage to the foundation of the viewing area.

Read more here on the history of medicine and fever epidemics in Ireland. historyofmedicineinireland.blogspot.com/2015/05/Cork-Street-Fever-Hospital.html

and more here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cork_Street_Fever_Hospital,_Dublin
See MoreSee Less

The Fever Hospital in Youghal: Did you know that there was once a hospital in Youghal known as the Fever Hospital. It was located on Raheen road near the town wall tower. The objectives of the hospital were to care for the diseased in the town and prevent the spread of infection in the homes of the poor. The hospital admitted fever patients who had contagious diseases like Scarlet Fever, Typhus epidemics (after the Irish Famine) Diphtheria, and other diseases.

In this picture, you can see the rear view of The Fever Hospital as seen from the grounds of St Marys Collegiate Church Youghal, ( Photo by Mikey Roche) and picture inset the map ( Historic map 1888 to 1913) showing the location of The Fever Hospital on Raheen Road (Now a carpark next to the town wall tower)

*In Victorian times the viewing platform at Moll Goggins Corner in Youghal was well known as a place to relax and that the sea had a calming influence on people as well as health benefits when recuperating. Unfortunately, this place is closed off now to the public for safety reasons due to structural damage to the foundation of the viewing area.   

Read more here on the history of medicine and fever epidemics in Ireland. http://historyofmedicineinireland.blogspot.com/2015/05/Cork-Street-Fever-Hospital.html

and more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cork_Street_Fever_Hospital,_Dublin

Comment on Facebook

I remember the hospital lodge a Mr & Mrs Lynch lived there around early 50s or 60. they were the caretakers.

remember playing in there…it was very eerie. at night many people heading up to Raheen Park would not pass it….they would go up the Spa hill instead!!

Yes we used have adventures there as kids and eat the crabapples from there, the old house we called it

It was a cross the road where the gates and wall are

I remember the old building. It was just up the road from us and I was always afraid of it.

Some picture

Car park beside Tower..

My grandfather worked there.

Dreaded passing it

cool Stuart Hickey

Marguerite Roberts

Olive O'Shea

Is that where the rocking horse creche is now?

View more comments

19 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

Archive public notice in Youghal from way back in July 26th, 1884 to WHITEWASH YOUR HOUSES AND WALLS.

This is an interesting old Youghal Public Information Poster from July 26th 1884. It reads; NOTICE. The Youghal Urban Sanitary Authority hereby give Notice that they will require the owners of small houses in Lanes and Squares TO WHITEWASH same every week until 1st October next. A strict examination will be made to see that this order is carried out. By Order, James J. O’Shea, Executive Sanitary Officer. Board Room, Town Hall, Youghal, July 26th, 1884.

– Whitewash was a type of cheap paint and also aided in sanitation. Whitewash was used historically in poorer areas and still retains something of this association with poverty. There was an old saying: "Too proud to whitewash and too poor to paint."
(Thanks to the late Noel Joyce for the poster)
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Archive public notice in Youghal from way back in July 26th, 1884 to WHITEWASH YOUR HOUSES AND WALLS.

This is an interesting old Youghal Public Information Poster from July 26th 1884. It reads; NOTICE. The Youghal Urban Sanitary Authority hereby give Notice that they will require the owners of small houses in Lanes and Squares TO WHITEWASH same every week until 1st October next. A strict examination will be made to see that this order is carried out. By Order, James J. OShea, Executive Sanitary Officer. Board Room, Town Hall, Youghal, July 26th, 1884. 

- Whitewash was a type of cheap paint and also aided in sanitation. Whitewash was used historically in poorer areas and still retains something of this association with poverty. There was an old saying: Too proud to whitewash and too poor to paint.
(Thanks to the late Noel Joyce for the poster)

Comment on Facebook

My Dad Noel … would have loved seeing this!

Any idea why it was required

20 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

Date: Sunday, March 29th, 2020
Cork County Council takes the lead in joining together Cork organisations to assist citizens during Covid-19.

Cork County Council COVID-19 Community Support Programme has been established to enable the coordination of a multi-agency response in the delivery of much needed services to vulnerable citizens across County Cork.

Leading Ireland’s largest county, Cork County Council, through its programme, will ensure that the wide variety of groups working across the county to assist those in need, will do so in an organized, collaborative and targeted way. The Council’s COVID-19 Community Support Programme will ensure the very best use of the many resources assisting vulnerable persons with their daily needs at this unprecedented time, whether that is by collecting medication, food shopping, social support or making contact at what might be a lonely time for many.

On Sunday 29th March 2020, the Chief Executive of Cork County Council convened (by teleconference) the first meeting of the Cork County Council COVID-19 Community Support Response Forum which committed fully to supporting the Council in delivering on itsCOVID-19 Community Support Programme. This Forum represents a multi-agency approach comprising senior representatives of both Statutory and Voluntary agencies operating across Cork County, and its important work will ensure commitment and consistency in terms of delivery of the Programme.

The reach of the range of organisations involved is county-wide, among them An Garda Siochana, HSE South, local development companies, An Post, the Civil Defence plus many more voluntary groups, whose rich local knowledge and wealth of experience will feed into a single contact point and system, established by Cork County Council.

Set to come into effect from Monday March 30th, 2020, Cork County Council has provided a dedicated FREE contact number 1800 805 819 with lines open from 8.00am to 8.00PM seven days a week. You can also email us at covidsupport@corkcoco.ie or text us at (085) 8709010.

Chief Executive of Cork County Council, Tim Lucey, explains “There are a number of agencies currently doing excellent work in delivering care to older and vulnerable people. From Community Gardaí, HSE and An Post to NGOs like ALONE, Meals on Wheels, Volunteer Ireland, GAA and many more. These groups are currently operating independently of each other and Cork County Council’s role is to provide a targeted, integrated and coordinated approach to the delivery of these much needed services to our more vulnerable citizens across the County during the COVID-19 pandemic. Cork County Council, through our Elected Members, our Municipal District and PPN structures, and in collaboration with our three Local Community Development Committees is ideally placed both statutorily and regionally to channel this great work, and provide the governance in partnership with all stakeholders. This public health crisis has changed life for so many, and we are there to help with that change. Our own staff whose day-jobs have changed due to closure of assets like our libraries, will be a key resource in the management and operation of this community support programme. And the libraries themselves will serve as Community Support Hubs during this time”.

Mayor of the County of Cork, Councillor Ian Doyle, welcomed the move saying “Cork County Council is perfectly placed to mobilise the community coordination needed and to bridge any gaps that might otherwise occur. We can facilitate collaboration between the many groups doing outstanding work to help meet the needs of all of our most vulnerable community members during these challenging times. From North Cork to our islands, Cork County Council’s Covid 19 Community Support Programme will ensure we serve each and every citizen of Cork County.”

Source: Communications Office <communications.office@corkcoco.ie>
Date: Sun, 29 Mar 2020 at 21:21
Subject: Cork County Council takes the lead in joining together Cork organisations to assistcitizens during Covid-19
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Date: Sunday, March 29th, 2020
Cork County Council takes the lead in joining together Cork organisations to assist citizens during Covid-19.

Cork County Council COVID-19 Community Support Programme has been established to enable the coordination of a multi-agency response in the delivery of much needed services to vulnerable citizens across County Cork.

Leading Ireland’s largest county, Cork County Council, through its programme, will ensure that the wide variety of groups working across the county to assist those in need, will do so in an organized, collaborative and targeted way.  The Council’s COVID-19 Community Support Programme will ensure the very best use of the many resources assisting vulnerable persons with their daily needs at this unprecedented time, whether that is by collecting medication, food shopping, social support or making contact at what might be a lonely time for many.

On Sunday 29th March 2020, the Chief Executive of Cork County Council convened (by teleconference) the first meeting of the Cork County Council COVID-19 Community Support Response Forum which committed fully to supporting the Council in delivering on itsCOVID-19 Community Support Programme. This Forum represents a multi-agency approach comprising senior representatives of both Statutory and Voluntary agencies operating across Cork County, and its important work will ensure commitment and consistency in terms of delivery of the Programme.

The reach of the range of organisations involved is county-wide, among them An Garda Siochana, HSE South, local development companies, An Post, the Civil Defence plus many more voluntary groups, whose rich local knowledge and wealth of experience will feed into a single contact point and system, established by Cork County Council.

Set to come into effect from Monday March 30th, 2020, Cork County Council has provided a dedicated FREE contact number 1800 805 819 with lines open from 8.00am to 8.00PM seven days a week.  You can also email us at covidsupport@corkcoco.ie or text us at (085) 8709010.

Chief Executive of Cork County Council, Tim Lucey, explains “There are a number of agencies currently doing excellent work in delivering care to older and vulnerable people. From Community Gardaí, HSE and An Post to NGOs like ALONE, Meals on Wheels, Volunteer Ireland, GAA and many more. These groups are currently operating independently of each other and Cork County Council’s role is to provide a targeted, integrated and coordinated approach to the delivery of these much needed services to our more vulnerable citizens across the County during the COVID-19 pandemic. Cork County Council, through our Elected Members, our Municipal District and PPN structures, and in collaboration with our three Local Community Development Committees is ideally placed both statutorily and regionally to channel this great work, and provide the governance in partnership with all stakeholders.  This public health crisis has changed life for so many, and we are there to help with that change.  Our own staff whose day-jobs have changed due to closure of assets like our libraries, will be a key resource in the management and operation of this community support programme.  And the libraries themselves will serve as Community Support Hubs during this time”.

Mayor of the County of Cork, Councillor Ian Doyle, welcomed the move saying “Cork County Council is perfectly placed to mobilise the community coordination needed and to bridge any gaps that might otherwise occur. We can facilitate collaboration between the many groups doing outstanding work to help meet the needs of all of our most vulnerable community members during these challenging times. From North Cork to our islands, Cork County Council’s Covid 19 Community Support Programme will ensure we serve each and every citizen of Cork County.”

Source: Communications Office 
Date: Sun, 29 Mar 2020 at 21:21
Subject: Cork County Council takes the lead in joining together Cork organisations to assistcitizens during Covid-19

20 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

Date: Sun, 29 Mar 2020
Cork County Council service operation changes

With the introduction of additional regulatory measures to minimise the spread of Covid 19 following the Government’s announcement, Cork County Council wishes to advise of further changes to its operations.

Cork County Council will continue to provide essential services and deal with emergencies; however all Council buildings will be closed to the public until further notice.

More than 120 Council services can be accessed online at www.YourCouncil.ie , while queries will continue to be taken by telephone on 021 4276891, by post and by email. General information on Cork County Council services and a full list of contact details can be found at www.corkcoco.ie

Cork County Council will continue to provide Homeless, Traveller and Social Work and HAP services. Other Housing services such as maintenance, applications/allocations, RAS/Leasing and call out response for anti-social behaviour will be available in emergency situations only.

The online service www.motortax.ie will continue to operate, as will the postal service: Motor Tax Postal, Model Business Park, Model Farm Road, Cork. Queries will also continue to be taken by email at motortax@corkcoco.ie. The Cork Motor Tax Office is closed to the public.

Cork County Council’s Planning Department will continue to accept and validate files.

Emergency Callouts with regard to road maintenance will be facilitated, while the Roads Winter Maintenance programme will continue together with the emptying of bins as well as essential public lighting repairs and traffic lights.

Cork County Council’s Civic Amenity Sites are temporarily closed with immediate effect. The Council’s ability to service bring sites has also been impacted upon and as such bins may fill more quickly than at other times. Customers are requested to store recyclable materials at home until the movement restrictions are lifted and Cork County Council can return to a full service offering. Please note any waste left on the ground at Bring Sites or left at Civic Amenity Sites when they are not operating is littering and will lead to prosecution.

Thanking the public for their continued cooperation, Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr. Ian Doyle advised

“I am heartened to see the many stories of communities supporting each other at this challenging time. I recognise that this is a difficult situation for everyone, particularly for the most vulnerable in our society. However, each of us have the power to make an impact, by remaining at home and restricting exercise to within 2km of where you reside, we can contribute to a better outcome for everyone. Stand by the amazing frontline staff who face this challenge with courage and determination. Stay at home; control the spread of this virus, together we can beat this.”

Chief Executive of Cork County Council, Tim Lucey added

“In light of the most recent measures announced by An Taoiseach, Cork County Council has reviewed its services, to ensure that while we join the National effort to fight the spread of this virus, key public services and critical supports remain available to the people of Cork County. To ensure our most vulnerable citizens are supported during this time, we have established the “Cork County Council COVID-19 Community Support Programme”. Through this initiative, the Council will gather the many agencies, community and voluntary groups that provide daily support to those most in need in their localities, to make sure these invaluable resources are accessible across Cork County.”

Cork County Council COVID-19 Community Support Programme has been established to assist those in need with non-medical, non-health related issues that have arisen as a result of Covid-19 restrictions. FREEPHONE 1800 805 819 daily from 8:00am to 8:00pm, text 085 8709010 or email covidsupport@corkcoco.ie if you or anyone vulnerable you know requires assistance, whether that is collecting medication, food shopping or social support and contact. Safe Stay safe and follow HSE advice

Source: Communications Office <communications.office@corkcoco.ie>
Date: Sun, 29 Mar 2020

More info here:
www.corkcoco.ie/en/news/cork-county-council-service-changes
See MoreSee Less

Date: Sun, 29 Mar 2020
Cork County Council service operation changes

With the introduction of additional regulatory measures to minimise the spread of Covid 19 following the Government’s announcement, Cork County Council wishes to advise of further changes to its operations.

Cork County Council will continue to provide essential services and deal with emergencies; however all Council buildings will be closed to the public until further notice.

More than 120 Council services can be accessed online at www.YourCouncil.ie , while queries will continue to be taken by telephone on 021 4276891, by post and by email.  General information on Cork County Council services and a full list of contact details can be found at www.corkcoco.ie 

Cork County Council will continue to provide Homeless, Traveller and Social Work and HAP services. Other Housing services such as maintenance, applications/allocations, RAS/Leasing and call out response for anti-social behaviour will be available in emergency situations only.

The online service www.motortax.ie will continue to operate, as will the postal service: Motor Tax Postal, Model Business Park, Model Farm Road, Cork.  Queries will also continue to be taken by email at motortax@corkcoco.ie. The Cork Motor Tax Office is closed to the public.  

Cork County Council’s Planning Department will continue to accept and validate files.

Emergency Callouts with regard to road maintenance will be facilitated, while the Roads Winter Maintenance programme will continue together with the emptying of bins as well as essential public lighting repairs and traffic lights.

Cork County Council’s Civic Amenity Sites are temporarily closed with immediate effect. The Council’s ability to service bring sites has also been impacted upon and as such bins may fill more quickly than at other times.  Customers are requested to store recyclable materials at home until the movement restrictions are lifted and Cork County Council can return to a full service offering.  Please note any waste left on the ground at Bring Sites or left at Civic Amenity Sites when they are not operating is littering and will lead to prosecution.

Thanking the public for their continued cooperation, Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr. Ian Doyle advised

“I am heartened to see the many stories of communities supporting each other at this challenging time. I recognise that this is a difficult situation for everyone, particularly for the most vulnerable in our society. However, each of us have the power to make an impact, by remaining at home and restricting exercise to within 2km of where you reside, we can contribute to a better outcome for everyone.  Stand by the amazing frontline staff who face this challenge with courage and determination. Stay at home; control the spread of this virus, together we can beat this.”

Chief Executive of Cork County Council, Tim Lucey added

“In light of the most recent measures announced by An Taoiseach, Cork County Council has reviewed its services, to ensure that while we join the National effort to fight the spread of this virus, key public services and critical supports remain available to the people of Cork County. To ensure our most vulnerable citizens are supported during this time, we have established the “Cork County Council COVID-19 Community Support Programme”. Through this initiative, the Council will gather the many agencies, community and voluntary groups that provide daily support to those most in need in their localities, to make sure these invaluable resources are accessible across Cork County.”

Cork County Council COVID-19 Community Support Programme has been established to assist those in need with non-medical, non-health related issues that have arisen as a result of Covid-19 restrictions. FREEPHONE 1800 805 819 daily from 8:00am to 8:00pm, text 085 8709010 or email covidsupport@corkcoco.ie if you or anyone vulnerable you know requires assistance, whether that is collecting medication, food shopping or social support and contact. Safe Stay safe and follow HSE advice

Source: Communications Office 
Date: Sun, 29 Mar 2020

More info here:
https://www.corkcoco.ie/en/news/cork-county-council-service-changes

YOUGHAL – COUNTY CORK – SUNDAY 29TH MARCH 2020
The streets and beaches of Youghal, Co. Cork were almost deserted on the first day of the country’s lockdown as the new Coronavirus Covid-19 regulations come into force. It was nothing like the scenes from the previous weekend when the beach attracted huge crowds in the March sunshine.

Cork County Council and An Garda Siochana wish to advise that traffic restrictions and patrols will be in place this weekend at beaches and amenity areas across Cork County.

Members of the public are asked to respect and adhere to the advice of Government and HSE in relation to physical distancing. Gatherings at such facilities is discouraged and will be dispersed. Traffic will be diverted by An Garda Siochana where necessary.

Cork County Council continues to ask the people of Cork County to work with us in our ongoing Community Support Programme. Stay safe and follow HSE advise.

The HSE provides all of Ireland’s public health services in hospitals and communities across the country.

For more information on how to protect yourself and others visit the HSE website here: www2.hse.ie/conditions/coronavirus/protect-yourself.html
See MoreSee Less

YOUGHAL - COUNTY CORK - SUNDAY 29TH MARCH 2020
The streets and beaches of Youghal, Co. Cork were almost deserted on the first day of the countrys lockdown as the new Coronavirus Covid-19 regulations come into force. It was nothing like the scenes from the previous weekend when the beach attracted huge crowds in the March sunshine.

Cork County Council and An Garda Siochana wish to advise that traffic restrictions and patrols will be in place this weekend at beaches and amenity areas across Cork County.

Members of the public are asked to respect and adhere to the advice of Government and HSE in relation to physical distancing. Gatherings at such facilities is discouraged and will be dispersed. Traffic will be diverted by An Garda Siochana where necessary.

Cork County Council continues to ask the people of Cork County to work with us in our ongoing Community Support Programme. Stay safe and follow HSE advise.

The HSE provides all of Irelands public health services in hospitals and communities across the country.

For more information on how to protect yourself and others visit the HSE website here:  https://www2.hse.ie/conditions/coronavirus/protect-yourself.html

2 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

A Little History (Piosa Beag Stair) by Mike Hackett

John (Sean) O’Connor, Principal of Piltown National School, told a great story from the 1950s when Waterford had an outstanding hurling team. Some older people will remember Ned Power, Austin Flynn, Tom Cheasty, Frankie Walsh, Johnny Kiely and Philly Grimes. They won the All-Ireland in 1959.

Sean and two of his pals set off for Semple Stadium in Thurles one Summer Sunday morning to cheer on their Waterford team against Cork. Demand for the stand tickets was high and one of the pals was lucky to be able to buy three from his local club. Everything was nicely arranged. It was in Sean’s green Morris-Minor car that the three travelled and of course he was driving.

When approaching Thurles, the traffic was getting numerous and slowing down. Car drivers were entering the different fields that had been opened as car parks for the day. All vehicles were slow-moving and it was hard for the three men to be patient as the start of a great game was approaching. After a while, Sean’s two passengers decided to walk away to the pitch – – – leaving him to queue at the gate to a car-park field. They would meet him outside Hayes’s Hotel in the square in about quarter-of-an-hour. Sean parked the car and ran for the square in the middle of Thurles. One little problem then crossed his mind: the pal, who had got the tickets, had the three tickets in his pocket. And guess what – – Sean O’Connor could not find the two pals in the crowd. It was now close to the starting time for the match. He decided to head for the stadium and hopefully meet them at the gates. However, there was no sign of them outside the gates.

Just then, as he scratched his head, he saw a man approach a small door in the wall of the stadium and give a loud knock. Then a voice from inside said in Gaelige “Ce ta ann?”. An freagra (the answer) “Cigire, Cumann Luth Cleas Gael” (An Inspector of the G.A.A.) said the man outside. The door opened and in he went. Sean got an idea! He went over to the same door and gave a loud knock. Again “Ce ta ann?” duirt an duine istigh (said a voice from inside). “Cigire, Cumann Luth Cleas Gael” duirt Sean. The door opened and Sean went in. “Failte” duirt an fear. (“Welcome” said the man behind the door). Sean found a premium seat amongst the dignitaries, in line with the middle of the pitch, and enjoyed the match. It was a reward for his perseverance and tenacity. To increase his happiness (following all the anxiety) Waterford won the game.

The three pals later met back at the car-park field and Sean had a great sceal (story) to tell. He told an sceal seo liomsa, fado, fado. (He told me this story himself many years ago).

– By Mike Hackett.

Pictured: Waterford Hurling Team, Munster Champions 1959
Waterford Hurling team photographed before the Munster final against Cork at Semple Stadium. The final score was Waterford 3-09 to Cork 2-09. The team from left to right, front row: Tom Cheasty, Donal Whelan, Charlie Ware, Frankie Walsh, Austin Flynn, Martin Óg Morrissey and Joe Harney. Back row, left to right: Larry Guinan, Jackie Condon, Ned Power, John Kiely, John Barron, Mickey Lacey, Seamus Power and Phil Grimes.
See MoreSee Less

A Little History (Piosa Beag Stair) by Mike Hackett

John (Sean) O’Connor, Principal of Piltown National School, told a great story from the 1950s when Waterford had an outstanding hurling team.  Some older people will remember Ned Power, Austin Flynn, Tom Cheasty, Frankie Walsh, Johnny Kiely and Philly Grimes.  They won the All-Ireland in 1959.  

Sean and two of his pals set off for Semple Stadium in Thurles one Summer Sunday morning to cheer on their Waterford team against Cork.  Demand for the stand tickets was high and one of the pals was lucky to be able to buy three from his local club.  Everything was nicely arranged.  It was in Sean’s green Morris-Minor car that the three travelled and of course he was driving.  

When approaching Thurles, the traffic was getting numerous and slowing down.  Car drivers were entering the different fields that had been opened as car parks for the day.  All vehicles were slow-moving and it was hard for the three men to be patient as the start of a great game was approaching.  After a while, Sean’s two passengers decided to walk away to the pitch - - - leaving him to queue at the gate to a car-park field.  They would meet him outside Hayes’s Hotel in the square in about quarter-of-an-hour.  Sean parked the car and ran for the square in the middle of Thurles. One little problem then crossed his mind:  the pal, who had got the tickets, had the three tickets in his pocket.  And guess what - - Sean O’Connor could not find the two pals in the crowd.  It was now close to the starting time for the match.  He decided to head for the stadium and hopefully meet them at the gates. However, there was no sign of them outside the gates. 

Just then, as he scratched his head, he saw a man approach a small door in the wall of the stadium and give a loud knock.  Then a voice from inside said in Gaelige “Ce ta ann?”.  An freagra (the answer) “Cigire, Cumann Luth Cleas Gael” (An Inspector of the G.A.A.) said the man outside.  The door opened and in he went.  Sean got an idea!  He went over to the same door and gave a loud knock.  Again “Ce ta ann?” duirt an duine istigh (said a voice from inside).  “Cigire, Cumann Luth Cleas Gael” duirt Sean.  The door opened and Sean went in. “Failte” duirt an fear.  (“Welcome” said the man behind the door).  Sean found a premium seat amongst the dignitaries, in line with the middle of the pitch, and enjoyed the match.  It was a reward for his perseverance and tenacity. To increase his happiness (following all the anxiety) Waterford won the game.  

The three pals later met back at the car-park field and Sean had a great sceal (story) to tell.  He told an sceal seo liomsa, fado, fado. (He told me this story himself many years ago).

- By Mike Hackett.

Pictured: Waterford Hurling Team, Munster Champions 1959
Waterford Hurling team photographed before the Munster final against Cork at Semple Stadium. The final score was Waterford 3-09 to Cork 2-09. The team from left to right, front row: Tom Cheasty, Donal Whelan, Charlie Ware, Frankie Walsh, Austin Flynn, Martin Óg Morrissey and Joe Harney. Back row, left to right: Larry Guinan, Jackie Condon, Ned Power, John Kiely, John Barron, Mickey Lacey, Seamus Power and Phil Grimes.

2 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

Don Lehane from Ferrypoint, Monatrea – A tribute by Mike Hackett.

Lest we forget – Historian Don Lehane of Ferrypoint, to whom we owe so much gratitude for his tremendous website ‘History of Kinsalebeg’.

Born in July 1948, Don was son of Dan and Kitty Lehane at Ferrypoint, Kinsalebeg. He was reared just above that Ferrypoint, at the start of the road up the hill that leads around the headland, where his mother had a shop. That little shop was a great attraction for Youghal townspeople coming over on the ferryboat (which plied every hour at four old pence return) for a day-out across the ‘Ferry’.

After National school in nearby Piltown, Don (he was called Donie when young) attended the Christian Brothers Secondary school, across the river in Youghal. His father Dan worked for Mrs. Dora Haccius at Muckridge House near Youghal where he had a workmate in Ned Hartery of Ticknock. While Ned had a little car, Dan had a version of the reliable Honda 50. An amusing memory of Ned is how he drove his wife, Mary, to Bingo every Sunday night but would never go in himself. Instead he used to chat with Michael Crowley in the Esso shop at Mill Road for the two hours.

But back to Don, who emigrated with Michael Casey of Lombard’s Pub to England in 1966. Don stayed working there before going to the Netherlands where he worked for Philips in Eindhoven as a computer analyst. It was there that he met his wife-to-be, Ans. He returned to Ireland in 1974 to do Computer Science at Trinity College and settling in Dublin. He married and they had three boys; Greg, Bart and Sam. Then, although now living in Dublin, he began to research the history of his native parish of Kinsalebeg. He was very dedicated and tenacious in this challenge and so was greatly successful. Many facts and stories that had been lost in the mists of time were newly discovered and recorded properly. A big step forward was when he set up a web page on which he showed the fruits of his endeavours. That web-site address is ‘History of Kinsalebeg’ and is well worth a visit – – especially for people from the parish and for students doing history.

One of his three sisters lives in Clashmore; Eileen Dunne, another sister Anne Browne lives upriver at Camphire, while a third sister Mary, lives in Ballincollig.


G.A.A. was a huge part of his life. He played for Ardmore and a few weeks after he had gone to England, (Michael O’Brien of Rath was the chairman of the Ardmore club at the time), they flew him home to play in an important match. He was very involved in the Waterford supporters club and attended most of the county matches up until he passed away in Sept 2014. Aside from the massive research for ‘History of Kinsalebeg’ and interest in family members back home, the G.A.A. was his main connection with the people of Waterford.

Don was involved in a new G.A.A. club in Dublin in the late 1970s. It is the St. Judes Club in Templeogue and is now a senior club in all codes. He played for them at first and then when his sons started to play he went on to manage teams at every level including the senior footballers. He became heavily involved in various club committees and fund raising activities for jerseys and the building of a club-house. As if that wasn’t enough, he contributed extensively to a book on the history of the club ‘Growing with the Community’ which won a McNamee award. It was published in 2003 on the 25th anniversary of the club.

Sadly, Don got sick in his early sixties, battled the illness for years, but succumbed on 4th Sept 2014. He is buried in Piltown cemetery, just across the road from where he attended school. It is important that we don’t forget him and that we continue to appreciate all the probing and investigations that he undertook in his last years, despite the illness, on behalf of his native area.

You often hear the phrase about how “It’s a small world” – – well here is the proof: Don’s grandson, Tom Lehane (son of Greg), is in the same class at St. Josephs National School, Terenure, Dublin – – as is my own grandson, Alex Morris. They are good pals.

Lastly, to give a taste of the information on the ‘History of Kinsalebeg’ web-site, you have : Navy men of Kinsalebeg; Dowdalls of Piltown Manor; The Fishers of Piltown; The Woodbine Hill Roches; Monatrea House; Walshs of Piltown; Kinsalebeg Church; Piaras McGearailt; D’Loughdane House of the Ronaynes; Piltown Castle; Prospect Hall; and navy hero Stoker Lynch of Caliso Bay. The changes in the Irish speaking population are also dealt with.

May Don Lehane from Ferrypoint, Monatrea, rest in peace. We shall not forget him.

By Mike Hackett.

Visit the fascinating website here: kinsalebeg.com/
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Don Lehane from Ferrypoint, Monatrea - A tribute by Mike Hackett.

Lest we forget - Historian Don Lehane of Ferrypoint, to whom we owe so much gratitude for his tremendous website ‘History of Kinsalebeg’.

Born in July 1948, Don was son of Dan and Kitty Lehane at Ferrypoint, Kinsalebeg. He was reared just above that Ferrypoint, at the start of the road up the hill that leads around the headland, where his mother had a shop.  That little shop was a great attraction for Youghal townspeople coming over on the ferryboat (which plied every hour at four old pence return) for a day-out across the ‘Ferry’. 

After National school in nearby Piltown, Don (he was called Donie when young) attended the Christian Brothers Secondary school, across the river in Youghal.  His father Dan worked for Mrs. Dora Haccius at Muckridge House near Youghal where he had a workmate in Ned Hartery of Ticknock.  While Ned had a little car, Dan had a version of the reliable Honda 50.  An amusing memory of Ned is how he drove his wife, Mary, to Bingo every Sunday night but would never go in himself.  Instead he used to chat with Michael Crowley in the Esso shop at Mill Road for the two hours.
 
But back to Don, who emigrated with Michael Casey of Lombard’s Pub to England in 1966.  Don stayed working there before going to the Netherlands where he worked for Philips in Eindhoven as a computer analyst.  It was there that he met his wife-to-be, Ans.  He returned to Ireland in 1974 to do Computer Science at Trinity College and settling in Dublin.  He married and they had three boys; Greg, Bart and Sam. Then, although now living in Dublin, he began to research the history of his native parish of Kinsalebeg. He was very dedicated and tenacious in this challenge and so was greatly successful.  Many facts and stories that had been lost in the mists of time were newly discovered and recorded properly.  A big step forward was when he set up a web page on which he showed the fruits of his endeavours.  That web-site address is ‘History of Kinsalebeg’ and is well worth a visit - - especially for people from the parish and for students doing history.  

One of his three sisters lives in Clashmore; Eileen Dunne, another sister Anne Browne lives upriver at Camphire, while a third sister Mary, lives in Ballincollig. 
 

G.A.A. was a huge part of his life. He played for Ardmore and a few weeks after he had gone to England, (Michael O’Brien of Rath was the chairman of the Ardmore club at the time), they flew him home to play in an important match.  He was very involved in the Waterford supporters club and attended most of the county matches up until he passed away in Sept 2014.  Aside from the massive research for ‘History of Kinsalebeg’ and interest in family members back home, the G.A.A. was his main connection with the people of Waterford. 

Don was involved in a new G.A.A. club in Dublin in the late 1970s.  It is the St. Judes Club in Templeogue and is now a senior club in all codes.  He played for them at first and then when his sons started to play he went on to manage teams at every level including the senior footballers.  He became heavily involved in various club committees and fund raising activities for jerseys and the building of a club-house. As if that wasn’t enough, he contributed extensively to a book on the history of the club ‘Growing with the Community’ which won a McNamee award. It was published in 2003 on the 25th anniversary of the club.   
 
Sadly, Don got sick in his early sixties, battled the illness for years, but succumbed on 4th Sept 2014.  He is buried in Piltown cemetery, just across the road from where he attended school.  It is important that we don’t forget him and that we continue to appreciate all the probing and investigations that he undertook in his last years, despite the illness, on behalf of his native area.  

You often hear the phrase about how “It’s a small world” - - well here is the proof:  Don’s grandson, Tom Lehane (son of Greg), is in the same class at St. Josephs National School, Terenure, Dublin  - -  as is my own grandson, Alex Morris.  They are good pals.  

Lastly, to give a taste of the information on the ‘History of Kinsalebeg’ web-site, you have :  Navy men of Kinsalebeg; Dowdalls of Piltown Manor; The Fishers of Piltown; The Woodbine Hill Roches;  Monatrea House;  Walshs of Piltown;  Kinsalebeg Church;  Piaras McGearailt;  D’Loughdane House of the Ronaynes;  Piltown Castle;  Prospect Hall;  and navy hero Stoker Lynch of Caliso Bay.  The changes in the Irish speaking population are also dealt with.                                     

May Don Lehane from Ferrypoint, Monatrea, rest in peace.   We shall not forget him.

By Mike Hackett.

Visit the fascinating website here: http://kinsalebeg.com/

Comment on Facebook

Lovely tribute to a lovely man. We knew Don from Jude's GAA Club, and my husband, who is from Youghal, used to chat and reminisce with Don regularly.

It would be great if there was some way his local history could be published in book form, he had such a lovely writing style which transformed dry facts into lively information. Super to see him getting such recognition Michael.

Lovely Words Michael.

Georgina Keogh

Tim Hyde

Laura Griffith John Griffith

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2 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

28th MARCH 2020:
The incredible and unprecedented sight of Youghal Beach and Claycastle Car Park left empty after the coronavirus lockdown on Saturday 28th March 2020. Photo by Piotr Kedzierski Photography.

Cork County Council and An Garda Siochana wish to advise that traffic restrictions and patrols will be in place this weekend at beaches and amenity areas across Cork County.

Members of the public are asked to respect and adhere to the advice of Government and HSE in relation to physical distancing. Gatherings at such facilities is discouraged and will be dispersed. Traffic will be diverted by An Garda Siochana where necessary.

Cork County Council continues to ask the people of Cork County to work with us in our ongoing Community Support Programme. Stay safe and follow HSE advise.

Image: Piotr Kedzierski Photography
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28th MARCH 2020:
The incredible and unprecedented sight of Youghal Beach and Claycastle Car Park left empty after the coronavirus lockdown on Saturday 28th March 2020. Photo by Piotr Kedzierski Photography. 

Cork County Council and An Garda Siochana wish to advise that traffic restrictions and patrols will be in place this weekend at beaches and amenity areas across Cork County.

Members of the public are asked to respect and adhere to the advice of Government and HSE in relation to physical distancing. Gatherings at such facilities is discouraged and will be dispersed. Traffic will be diverted by An Garda Siochana where necessary.

Cork County Council continues to ask the people of Cork County to work with us in our ongoing Community Support Programme. Stay safe and follow HSE advise.

Image: Piotr Kedzierski Photography

Comment on Facebook

Let's hope the town can get back on it's feet when the virus has finally been defeated.

Looks like the eighties again!

3 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

Memories of the late John Kennedy and his "Gossip Shop" on North Main Street, Youghal, and a lovely tribute by his friend and local author Mike Hackett.
(Pictured are John Kennedy, Jim Burke and Alice Mangan having a chat outside James Burke’s Optician Shop on North Main Street, Youghal.)

If you wanted a good chat – – a good argument – – or to embellish a tale to a tolerant listenership – – then the Gossip Shop was the place to be. It was a place (at 135 North Main Street, Youghal) that sold books, clocks, bikes, radios, record-players, table-ware, silver cutlery and most anything in the antique line that you can think of. It was a kind of club-house where men were sure of a welcome – – especially if they had some controversial topic to start a discussion.

John Kennedy (R.I.P.) was the owner/proprietor of the premises and he opened the shop just Thursday, Friday and Saturday. He laughed easily and it created a jovial atmosphere. Some of the ‘panel’ that occupied the chairs at the back of the shop were: Pat Lynch, John Flaherty, Pat Coughlan, John Kiely, Gene O’Beirne, Nora McGrath, Donal de Roiste, John Cunningham, Noel Cronin, Kay Downey, Tom Walsh, Tom Farrisey and Pat Motherway. Sadly some of the ‘club’ have passed on over the past few years – – we remember: Mikie Roche, famous projector operator and photographer; Jim Morrison (Strand), a John McCormack fan; Davy Hayes, motorbike fan, Bobby Bickerdike (Presto), photographer, and John Crawford from Ardmore. They could not come up the town without participating in the ‘panel’.

John (an only child) was reared in Ballyquin near Ardmore where his people had a small land-holding. His father died at a young age at about the same time as John went to secondary school at St. Augustines in Dungarvan. Later, on leaving school, he went to work for Colm Moloney’s record and radio shop in Dungarvan, at a time (the 1950s) when the Irish showbands were taking the country by storm. The Royal Showband, the Dixies, Drifters, Miami, Capitol and Freshmen were just a few of them. The resulting sale of records (both 45s and long-players) ensured a thriving business as fans listened to the Irish Top Ten with Larry Gogan or to the B.B.C.’s Top Twenty.

After a few years in Dungarvan, John moved over to Youghal (in 1957) where Colm had opened a new shop. John ran that for a while before he started up on his own at ‘The Gossip Shop’ at 135 North Main Street. His neighbours were: Leonard Clarke, Shoe Shop and Jim Burke, optician. It was now the early 1960s and R.T.E. television had just started broadcasting to this part of the country. T.V. sales took off in a big way and John was kept very busy at selling the sets and erecting aerials in town and country. He told a story about placing a T.V. set in his shop window when the visit to Ireland of President Kennedy was broadcast. The huge crowd outside the window blocked the traffic on the street and John feared for his plate-glass window. No doubt it was a good public-relations exercise and the sales of T.V. sets went higher than ever.

Sheila Yeomans (whose people had a large and successful holiday accommodation house at the Youghal Front Strand ) came into John’s life at that stage. They got married and had four children; Aidan, Robert, Johnny, and Alice. The Cope Foundation in Cork was very dear to John as Alice attends there. He raised thousands of euro over the years for that cause. In later life, John with his wife Sheila and Alice would go for a long drive every Sunday. It could be as far as Gougane Barra (Cork), or over the Vee near Clogheen (Tipp) or to visit Dunmore East in his own county. He loved admiring the wildflowers of the country-side and watching the arrival of foreign birds as they arrived here for the Summer.
He was a fan of John McCormack music and during his broadcast hour, on Community Radio Youghal every Sunday morning, he would play one of McCormack’s numbers. He also ran a John McCormack music circle in Cobh where he attended every Friday night. Also in the month of May, he would play the ‘Queen of the May’ hymn;

Bring flowers of the rarest, bring flowers of the fairest,
From garden and woodland and hillside and dale,
Our full hearts are swelling, our glad voices telling
Of Mary the loveliest flower of the Vale.
Oh Mary, we crown thee with blossoms today
Queen of the Angels and Queen of the May
Oh Mary, we crown thee with blossoms today
Queen of the Angels and Queen of the May.

The many faces of John and his achievements are so numerous: he loved acting and stage work and in 1966 he played the part of Jim Larkin in ‘The Risen People’. That play ran in the Town Hall for a week to commemorate the 1916 rising. That was only one of the many parts he played on different stages all over his area. Then when the Ardmore Pattern Festival would take place every July – – who was dressed as St. Declan arriving from over the sea by boat? Yes! It was John Kennedy. Halla Deaglan (the parish hall in Ardmore) holds a music and story-telling session every Monday afternoon which is always well attended. He was one of the founder members of that group and was an anchor of those sessions. Although he claimed that he could not sing, for his party piece, he would read a short story from a book by Eamon Kelly in his loud bass voice.

John was a hoarder and the depth of the premises at 135 suited his aims. It stretches back half-way into the block and even though it is just a single shop in front, it goes back about six times that far over two floors. One tale told of a woman coming in for a simple wedding present for a neighbour. She was not a guest but was anxious to give something as a token. John showed her a canteen of silver-plate cutlery which was delightful but much bigger than she intended. When she asked “How much?” John replied “Ten euro”. She knew it was worth away more than that. “Why is it such a bargain” she asked. “Well” said John – – “It has been upstairs for about forty years and the 1975 price is on it. Converted, it comes out at ten euro”. He was a very honest man to whom money didn’t mean a lot. Laughter and fun meant more than wealth.
Another sceal (story) told of two elderly men coming down from Cork every Thursday to the sea-side town and they always had to visit the ‘Gossip Shop’ before going home. Around o the walls of the shop you had clocks of all descriptions hanging. Hall clocks, pendulum clocks, mantle clocks and cuckoo clocks. One day John overheard one man say to the other “All those clocks are stopped. I wonder can they work at all”. John said to himself that he would show them. They usually arrived on the bus around 11-30 and would be in the ‘Gossip Shop’ before twelve mid-day for a half-hour. On the following Thursday, John was ready for them. He had wound every clock on every wall and put all hands at the right time. Then in came the visitors from the bus. The chat continued until twelve, then all hell broke loose – – bells (of many tones) started ringing – – the men couldn’t hear each other – – and that wasn’t all – – a cat started to screech twelve times from another clock and two cuckoos came out of their clocks. The cuckoos seemed to be answering each other from across the room. The men had enough – – John was laughing louder than the cuckoos.

John passed away from us suddenly on the 31st January 2018 at eighty years of age, having packed a great lot into that lifetime. You can now imagine how big a loss he is – – to Sheila, his family and to the whole community for so many reasons and last but not least to the ‘Gossip Shop’.
Just recently, before the corona-virus scare, Sheila held a sale of the contents of the shop. It went on for three days and realised over twenty-three thousand euro for charities. It was distributed as follows – – one third each to: The Cope Foundation at Cork; Community Radio Youghal and Halla Deaglan san Ardmhor (St. Declan’s Hall in Ardmore) – – each got over seven thousand euro. John would have wished it like that.
When finishing his hour on C.R.Y. every Sunday morning, his last words would be “Til we meet again, I wish you well”.
May he rest in peace – – – Mike Hackett.
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Memories of the late John Kennedy and his Gossip Shop on North Main Street, Youghal, and a lovely tribute by his friend and local author Mike Hackett.
(Pictured are John Kennedy, Jim Burke and Alice Mangan having a chat outside James Burke’s Optician Shop on North Main Street, Youghal.)     

If you wanted a good chat - - a good argument - - or to embellish a tale to a tolerant listenership - - then the Gossip Shop was the place to be.  It was a place (at 135 North Main Street, Youghal) that sold books, clocks, bikes, radios, record-players, table-ware, silver cutlery and most anything in the antique line that you can think of.  It was a kind of club-house where men were sure of a welcome - - especially if they had some controversial topic to start a discussion.  

John Kennedy (R.I.P.) was the owner/proprietor of the premises and he opened the shop just Thursday, Friday and Saturday.  He laughed easily and it created a jovial atmosphere.  Some of the ‘panel’ that occupied the chairs at the back of the shop were: Pat Lynch, John Flaherty, Pat Coughlan, John Kiely, Gene O’Beirne, Nora McGrath, Donal de Roiste, John Cunningham, Noel Cronin, Kay Downey, Tom Walsh, Tom Farrisey and Pat Motherway.  Sadly some of the ‘club’ have passed on over the past few years - - we remember: Mikie Roche, famous projector operator and photographer; Jim Morrison (Strand), a John McCormack fan; Davy Hayes, motorbike fan, Bobby Bickerdike (Presto), photographer, and John Crawford from Ardmore. They could not come up the town without participating in the ‘panel’.
  
John (an only child) was reared in Ballyquin near Ardmore where his people had a small land-holding.  His father died at a young age at about the same time as John went to secondary school at St. Augustines in Dungarvan.  Later, on leaving school, he went to work for Colm Moloney’s record and radio shop in Dungarvan, at a time (the 1950s) when the Irish showbands were taking the country by storm.  The Royal Showband, the Dixies, Drifters, Miami, Capitol and Freshmen were just a few of them.  The resulting sale of records (both 45s and long-players) ensured a thriving business as fans listened to the Irish Top Ten with Larry Gogan or to the B.B.C.’s Top Twenty.  

After a few years in Dungarvan, John moved over to Youghal (in 1957) where Colm had opened a new shop.  John ran that for a while before he started up on his own at ‘The Gossip Shop’ at 135 North Main Street.  His neighbours were: Leonard Clarke, Shoe Shop and Jim Burke, optician.  It was now the early 1960s and R.T.E. television had just started broadcasting to this part of the country. T.V. sales took off in a big way and John was kept very busy at selling the sets and erecting aerials in town and country.  He told a story about placing a T.V. set in his shop window when the visit to Ireland of President Kennedy was broadcast.  The huge crowd outside the window blocked the traffic on the street and John feared for his plate-glass window.  No doubt it was a good public-relations exercise and the sales of T.V. sets went higher than ever.  

Sheila Yeomans (whose people had a large and successful holiday accommodation house at the Youghal Front Strand ) came into John’s life at that stage. They got married and had four children; Aidan, Robert, Johnny, and Alice. The Cope Foundation in Cork was very dear to John as Alice attends there. He raised thousands of euro over the years for that cause.  In later life, John with his wife Sheila and Alice would go for a long drive every Sunday.  It could be as far as Gougane Barra (Cork), or over the Vee near Clogheen (Tipp) or to visit Dunmore East in his own county.  He loved admiring the wildflowers of the country-side and watching the arrival of foreign birds as they arrived here for the Summer.
He was a fan of John McCormack music and during his broadcast hour, on Community Radio Youghal every Sunday morning, he would play one of McCormack’s numbers.  He also ran a John McCormack music circle in Cobh where he attended every Friday night.  Also in the month of May, he would play the ‘Queen of the May’ hymn;

Bring flowers of the rarest, bring flowers of the fairest,
From garden and woodland and hillside and dale,
Our full hearts are swelling, our glad voices telling 
Of  Mary the loveliest flower of the Vale.
Oh Mary, we crown thee with blossoms today 
Queen of the Angels and Queen of the May
Oh Mary, we crown thee with blossoms today
Queen of the Angels and Queen of the May.

The many faces of John and his achievements are so numerous:  he loved acting and stage work and in 1966 he played the part of Jim Larkin in ‘The Risen People’. That play ran in the Town Hall for a week to commemorate the 1916 rising.  That was only one of the many parts he played on different stages all over his area.  Then when the Ardmore Pattern Festival would take place every July - - who was dressed as St. Declan arriving from over the sea by boat?  Yes!  It was John Kennedy.  Halla Deaglan (the parish hall in Ardmore) holds a music and story-telling session every Monday afternoon which is always well attended.  He was one of the founder members of that group and was an anchor of those sessions. Although he claimed that he could not sing, for his party piece, he would read a short story from a book by Eamon Kelly in his loud bass voice.    

John was a hoarder and the depth of the premises at 135 suited his aims.  It stretches back half-way into the block and even though it is just a single shop in front, it goes back about six times that far over two floors.  One tale told of a woman coming in for a simple wedding present for a neighbour.  She was not a guest but was anxious to give something as a token.  John showed her a canteen of silver-plate cutlery which was delightful but much bigger than she intended.  When she asked “How much?”  John replied “Ten euro”.  She knew it was worth away more than that.  “Why is it such a bargain” she asked.  “Well” said John - - “It has been upstairs for about forty years and the 1975 price is on it.  Converted, it comes out at ten euro”.  He was a very honest man to whom money didn’t mean a lot. Laughter and fun meant more than wealth.  
Another sceal (story) told of two elderly men coming down from Cork every Thursday to the sea-side town and they always had to visit the ‘Gossip Shop’ before going home.  Around o the walls of the shop you had clocks of all descriptions hanging.  Hall clocks, pendulum clocks, mantle clocks and cuckoo clocks.  One day John overheard one man say to the other “All those clocks are stopped. I wonder can they work at all”.  John said to himself that he would show them.  They usually arrived on the bus around 11-30 and would be in the ‘Gossip Shop’ before twelve mid-day for a half-hour. On the following Thursday, John was ready for them.  He had wound every clock on every wall and put all hands at the right time.  Then in came the visitors from the bus. The chat continued until twelve, then all hell broke loose - - bells (of many tones) started ringing - - the men couldn’t hear each other - - and that wasn’t all - - a cat started to screech twelve times from another clock and two cuckoos came out of their clocks.  The cuckoos seemed to be answering each other from across the room.  The men had enough - - John was laughing louder than the cuckoos. 

John passed away from us suddenly on the 31st January 2018 at eighty years of age, having packed a great lot into that lifetime.  You can now imagine how big a loss he is - - to Sheila, his family and to the whole community for so many reasons and last but not least to the ‘Gossip Shop’.
Just recently, before the corona-virus scare, Sheila held a sale of the contents of the shop. It went on for three days and realised over twenty-three thousand euro for charities.  It was distributed as follows - - one third each to: The Cope Foundation at Cork; Community Radio Youghal and Halla Deaglan san Ardmhor (St. Declan’s Hall in Ardmore) - - each got over seven thousand euro. John would have wished it like that. 
When finishing his hour on C.R.Y. every Sunday morning, his last words would be “Til we meet again, I wish you well”.
May he rest in peace - - - Mike Hackett.

Comment on Facebook

Beautiful memories of a lovely gentleman.

he's got the Harley parked outside the door – how cool!!

Good man mick lovely

Beautiful

Yes hr did 👍

Aisling O'Flaherty

Did Jim Burke have an opticians there after he sold the chemist

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