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4 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

Youghal Fife & Drum Band (Photo taken outside Old British Prison Tallow St. Youghal 1912) – Photographer and source unknown. See MoreSee Less

Youghal Fife & Drum Band (Photo taken outside Old British Prison Tallow St. Youghal 1912) - Photographer and source unknown.

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Directly across from my home. Amazing Photo.

TALLOW (THE WONDER YEARS)

Any names?

16 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

Construction of the new Youghal beach boardwalk is nearly complete and the final finishing touches are being put in place. There are over 7,000 planks laid on the walkway which runs from Claycastle to Red Barn and adjacent to the dunes and reed beds of Ballyvergan Marsh.

The extension will see the original 400 metre boardwalk at Claycastle beach, which was completed in 2012, extended by 1.5km as far as the Redbarn Blue Flag beach. It will be open to the public in time for the summer tourist season.

Pictured is Michael Harkin of MH construction putting the final decking into place and picture inset shows the boardwalk coming together nicely. Well done to all the carpenters and construction workers on doing a wonderful job under the difficult circumstances.
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Construction of the new Youghal beach boardwalk is nearly complete and the final finishing touches are being put in place. There are over 7,000 planks laid on the walkway which runs from Claycastle to Red Barn and adjacent to the dunes and reed beds of Ballyvergan Marsh.

The extension will see the original 400 metre boardwalk at Claycastle beach, which was completed in 2012, extended by 1.5km as far as the Redbarn Blue Flag beach. It will be open to the public in time for the summer tourist season.

Pictured is Michael Harkin of MH construction putting the final decking into place and picture inset shows the boardwalk coming together nicely. Well done to all the carpenters and construction workers on doing a wonderful job under the difficult circumstances.

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Some parts seemed to have been open last weekend, perhaps unintentionally, but I was shocked to see dog poop on it already.

I hope the County Council puts up signs stating that the boardwalk is for pedestrians only. It is not suitable for cyclists. I've heard of cases where people were nearly knocked down on the existing boardwalk by cyclists and unless signs are erected there could well be more cyclists using the new section. It's a boardWALK. The Greenway will be there in a couple of years for cyclists.

Great work can’t wait to walk on at the weekend 😎

It looks fantastic very well done to all who worked on it. Looking forward to seeing it soon .🙋‍♀️👏

Well done to all concerned. It’s great to have the boardwalk and it should be respected by everybody. 👏👍😃

Looks fantastic ….well done to all x

Come on….im ready !!!!!!

Wonderful! Just curious is this just for pedestrians or will bikes be allowed as well?

Looks great can't wait to try it now🙏

Can’t wait 😁

James McFarlane

Gillian O'shea

Ross Mccarthy Jenna Fitzgerald

👏👏👏

Billy Feore

Kerry McCarthy

Fionan Leahy get excited

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19 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

Youghal featured on the national News.

RTE News journalist Jenny O’Sullivan and cameraman Eoin Daly reporting live from Youghal beach as the phased easing of the Level 5 Covid lockdown began on, Monday, 12th April, 2021.

After more than 100 days living under a Level 5 lockdown, Covid-19 restrictions were eased for the first time since December 30. People can now travel anywhere within their county or up to 20km from their home if they are crossing county boundaries. There is great hope at long last as we enter a new week.
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Youghal featured on the national News.

RTE News journalist Jenny OSullivan and cameraman Eoin Daly reporting live from Youghal beach as the phased easing of the Level 5 Covid lockdown began on, Monday, 12th April, 2021.

After more than 100 days living under a Level 5 lockdown, Covid-19 restrictions were eased for the first time since December 30. People can now travel anywhere within their county or up to 20km from their home if they are crossing county boundaries. There is great hope at long last as we enter a new week.

2 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

Yesterday’s partial lifting of Covid-19 travel restrictions saw a busy day on the country’s roads as people took the opportunity to travel beyond their 5 kilometre restriction for the first time in over 100 days.

In Co Cork, the popular seaside town of Youghal saw its beaches and boardwalk busy from early morning with visitors from out of town.
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Hope we can all get threw this soon. But we must still be cautious of the virus 🦠 and be patient until it is safe for us to enjoy life again as we did. This is a real problem in the United States and it effective us all. Stay strong 💪 and hopefully 🙏 it will pass soon.

Look Youghal it’s a little gem

Youghal beach looks fab and so do the Youghal ladies enjoying their cuppa happy days😎

Youghal beach looking well,and so are our local Ladies.

well done ladies representing Youghal Active Retirement Association looking great

Karen Walters ❤

Beautiful xx

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4 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

Bit of local history – Youghal Carpets was set up on Monday the 8th of March 1954 and had been in business for over 50 years. Sadly it closed down on November 2006. Known locally as the "Carpet Factory" it employed over 600 people at the height of production.

This image show an advert for ‘The Carpets’ from a tourist brochure. It reads: "Youghal Carpets Cover the World."

"Every week, carpets go out from Youghal to far away places. In less than 15 years Youghal Carpets have made astonishing progress, And are now prominent in the world’s market places of today – with an eye as always, on the markets of the future. The key factor of Youghal’s great success internationally is a progressive policy of freshness of design and colour-maintaining the highest possible standards of manufacture. Always"

The advertisement cartoon depicts two Martian like creatures looking back at planet Earth covered in Youghal Carpet with the caption "Wonder if it will ever catch on here?"
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Bit of local history - Youghal Carpets was set up on Monday the 8th of March 1954 and had been in business for over 50 years. Sadly it closed down on November 2006. Known locally as the Carpet Factory it employed over 600 people at the height of production.

This image show an advert for The Carpets from a tourist brochure.  It reads: Youghal Carpets Cover the World.

Every week, carpets go out from Youghal to far away places. In less than 15 years Youghal Carpets have made astonishing progress, And are now prominent in the worlds market places of today - with an eye as always, on the markets of the future. The key factor of Youghals great success internationally is a progressive policy of freshness of design and colour-maintaining the highest possible standards of manufacture. Always

The advertisement cartoon depicts two Martian like creatures looking back at planet Earth covered in Youghal Carpet with the caption Wonder if it will ever catch on here?

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Remember passing it on route to Ballyphehane from Rosslare. Always got really excited when I saw it, as I knew I would soon be at my grandparents door.

Got a lovely piece of Youghal carpet with the Clock Gate on it in our house in Spain.

My dad worked there for years. I have great memories of going into the factory with him. I remember the distinctive smells of the machines and the wool.

Great memories working in youghal carpets. Made great friends and loved going to work there

Ah the good days,,,did we ever realize how lucky we were at the time we worked there ,,,great workmates and employment

A great place to work.Had the best of friends .I lived just across the the road in Catherine Street .Happy times and lots of memories all good.

And what a factory it was… Still have piece of a cutting dad brought home of the US presidential shield. I believe it was used in superman movie.. And when he came to visit us on his first trip to drogheda.. Carpet in hall he went that's a navan carpet..

My father worked there for many years. And he made some great friends there.

My Mother Mary Flavin worked there with her friend Esther Moylan Dwyer RIP she always spoke fondly of it

Those were the days

My home town 🇮🇪

Happy times

My Dad Dick Byrne rip work there for almost 40 years.

Eddie Curley

Marie Oshea

Harry Hegarty

Happy memories.

Hated the place 😒

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5 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

The amazing sight of two Aintree Grand National winning jockeys, Davy Russell and Rachael Blackmore participating in the Celebrity Donkey Derby in Youghal back in 2015.

Rachael Blackmore became the first female jockey to win the Grand National 2021 after a stunning ride on Minella Times. Davy won the the Grand National twice in 2018 and 2019 on Tiger Roll.

It’s great to see them learn their trade in the charity fun race on the street of Youghal! Huge congratulations to history maker Rachael from all in Youghal.
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Brillant

Lee Dwyer

Pat O'Connor

Cllr Noel Cribbin

6 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

Do You Believe in Ghosts – By Mike Hackett

Paddy O’Keeffe was a salmon fisherman from Newport, Knockanore, who knew the tides of the river very well – – and all the moods and variations that it could take with the weather. When the tide was high – – the river almost lapped his front door and his salmon yawl would be on a bit of grass beside it. What a fantastic place to live – -directly across from Ballinaclash Quay. In that little house – – at the end of a cul-de-sac – – Paddy lived alone – – just a small terrier (Patch) was his company – – he was so happy.

One Monday morning Gerald Pomphrett (my blind walking partner) and I walked the eight miles to Newport to visit Paddy – – at his invitation of the previous week after I had met him in town. While we were there – -Tom Dalton with his grocery van arrived and Paddy bought bread and ham to treat his visitors. The talk inevitably turned to fishing- – and we remarked on the nets that were stacked up on the kitchen floor. “There’s a reason for that” said Paddy – – as he turned back the nets to reveal a dozen big salmon hidden underneath. As no fishing was permitted on a Sunday – – we were wondering where they had come from? “Don’t worry” said Paddy. “I caught them last night” – – “You see – – the salmon know when it is Sunday and they come up the river in big numbers – – and that’s when I catch them” said Paddy. No doubt that he was ‘codding’ us- – and he was enjoying it.

A few weeks after our visit- – he was fishing alone down-river by Templemichael Castle and graveyard as darkness approached. The tide was about to turn – -and would then assist him in returning up the river back home. Meanwhile he had time to spare and decided to go ashore – – to walk up Ministers Hill to Lombards Pub and have a few pints. He tied the boat below the castle and made his way up beside the graveyard. But then – – he froze! Something white was moving in the darkness between the headstones. There was no noise – – just a white apparition floating amongst the graves and crosses. Paddy ran the mile up the hill and reached the pub in a breathless state. A few of the regulars turned away from their pints to gaze at this sweaty man in a frightened state. “What happened to you?” they chorused together. “Down at Templemichael graveyard there is a ghost moving around between the headstones”. Of course at first nobody believed him – -but he kept it up by saying “Ye go down and see for yourselves”. Then “Okay – – jump into my car” said Billy Dalton and four men (without Paddy) went to see the ghost.

Francis – – the proprietor – – was wondering to herself about how many pints does it take to see a real ghost. When they reached Templemichael – – it seemed more eerie than usual and they quietly moved amongst the headstones. Suddenly a gasp rang out – – there was a large white vision towards the rear wall. It was moving along steadily. Drink or no drink – – they could make it out clearly enough. The bravest ventured forth – – and he was wondering at this stage if he had his rosary beads in his pocket. Then there was a loud ‘Hee Haw’ and a large white donkey made a run for the gate – – almost colliding with the frightened men. A pure white donkey in a graveyard at the dead of night!

Problem solved. Paddy was relieved to hear about the ‘ghost’ when they got back – – and he had managed to have his few pints in the meantime. This story was told by Tom Dalton many years ago.

Talking about dead men coming out of graveyards – – it has happened a few times. Once when a grave-digger was nearing the end of his dig – – he got a heart attack and died on the spot. He was removed to the local hospital to be cleaned up for the ‘wake’ and the following day he was brought back to the cemetery to be buried. When you think of that: A Dead Man Came out of the Graveyard ?

But what about the dead man who came out twice? John O’Callaghan was the caretaker of North Abbey Cemetery and lived with his wife, Han, in the lodge just inside the gate. John died one night and was brought to the District Hospital to be prepared for his ‘waking’. He was then brought back to his front room in the lodge for the ‘wake’ before the removal that evening to the local Parish Church. The next day saw the funeral bring him ‘home’ again and buried in North Abbey. He had come out twice and gone back in twice? You don’t have to be a ghost to be in and out of a graveyard!

Liam Ryan is the popular and reliable sacristan at the Parish Church on Ashe Street in Youghal. While locking the premises late one night – – he decided to close the mortuary first. This is like a small church beside the big one and is where bodies in coffins were kept overnight. It has its own big doors and can be locked separately. On this night – -there was a coffin in it – – otherwise it would have been closed already. He had just blown out the six large candles around the coffin and was alone now in real darkness. Then he felt a tap on his shoulder from behind. Knowing that he was alone – – he nearly dropped dead with the awful fright that he got. Summoning all his energy to get out the door – – he turned around to find a man standing there. It was Tommy Hannon from Mill Road who had come late to say a prayer for the deceased and was standing behind the door when Liam arrived in. There were more than prayers said that night!

And the last tale today tells of a famous character – – Billy Swayne – – taking a short-cut across North Abbey cemetery in the dark – – when he fell into a newly dug grave and couldn’t get back up. He started shouting and was heard by Hannah O’Callaghan – – who lived in the graveyard lodge at the gate. She was living alone at this time – -her husband had died a few months before that. Brave woman that she was – – she went up to investigate the awful screeching – -saw Billy and used the nearby ladder to help him out. A real live ghost!

Story by Mike Hackett (A real ghost).
Picture: St. Michael Church, Templemichael by @Kieran McCarthy
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Do You Believe in Ghosts - By Mike Hackett

Paddy O’Keeffe was a salmon fisherman from Newport, Knockanore, who knew the tides of the river very well - - and all the moods and variations that it could take with the weather.  When the tide was high - - the river almost lapped his front door and his salmon yawl would be on a bit of grass beside it.  What a fantastic place to live - -directly across from Ballinaclash Quay.  In that little house - - at the end of a cul-de-sac - - Paddy lived alone - - just a small terrier (Patch) was his company - - he was so happy.  

One Monday morning Gerald Pomphrett (my blind walking partner) and I walked the eight miles to Newport to visit Paddy - - at his invitation of the previous week after I had met him in town.  While we were there - -Tom Dalton with his grocery van arrived and Paddy bought bread and ham to treat his visitors.  The talk inevitably turned to fishing- - and we remarked on the nets that were stacked up on the kitchen floor.  “There’s a reason for that” said Paddy - - as he turned back the nets to reveal a dozen big salmon hidden underneath.  As no fishing was permitted on a Sunday - - we were wondering where they had come from?  “Don’t worry” said Paddy.  “I caught them last night” - - “You see - - the salmon know when it is Sunday and they come up the river in big numbers - - and that’s when I catch them” said Paddy.  No doubt that he was ‘codding’ us- - and he was enjoying it.  

A few weeks after our visit- - he was fishing alone down-river by Templemichael Castle and graveyard as darkness approached.  The tide was about to turn - -and would then assist him in returning up the river back home.  Meanwhile he had time to spare and decided to go ashore - - to walk up Ministers Hill to Lombards Pub and have a few pints.  He tied the boat below the castle and made his way up beside the graveyard.  But then - - he froze!  Something white was moving in the darkness between the headstones.  There was no noise - - just a white apparition floating amongst the graves and crosses.  Paddy ran the mile up the hill and reached the pub in a breathless state.  A few of the regulars turned away from their pints to gaze at this sweaty man in a frightened state.  “What happened to you?” they chorused together.  “Down at Templemichael graveyard there is a ghost moving around between the headstones”.  Of course at first nobody believed him - -but he kept it up by saying “Ye go down and see for yourselves”.  Then “Okay - - jump into my car” said Billy Dalton and four men (without Paddy) went to see the ghost. 

Francis - - the proprietor - - was wondering to herself about how many pints does it take to see a real ghost.  When they reached Templemichael - - it seemed more eerie than usual and they quietly moved amongst the headstones.  Suddenly a gasp rang out - - there was a large white vision towards the rear wall.  It was moving along steadily.  Drink or no drink - - they could make it out clearly enough.  The bravest ventured forth - - and he was wondering at this stage if he had his rosary beads in his pocket.  Then there was a loud ‘Hee Haw’ and a large white donkey made a run for the gate - - almost colliding with the frightened men.  A pure white donkey in a graveyard at the dead of night!  

Problem solved.  Paddy was relieved to hear about the ‘ghost’ when they got back - - and he had managed to have his few pints in the meantime.  This story was told by Tom Dalton many years ago. 

Talking about dead men coming out of graveyards - - it has happened a few times.  Once when a grave-digger was nearing the end of his dig - - he got a heart attack and died on the spot.  He was removed to the local hospital to be cleaned up for the ‘wake’ and the following day he was brought back to the cemetery to be buried. When you think of that: A Dead Man Came out of the Graveyard ?  

But what about the dead man who came out twice?  John O’Callaghan was the caretaker of North Abbey Cemetery and lived with his wife, Han, in the lodge just inside the gate.  John died one night and was brought to the District Hospital to be prepared for his ‘waking’.  He was then brought back to his front room in the lodge for the ‘wake’ before the removal that evening to the local Parish Church.  The next day saw the funeral bring him ‘home’ again and buried in North Abbey.  He had come out twice and gone back in twice?  You don’t have to be a ghost to be in and out of a graveyard!

Liam Ryan is the popular and reliable sacristan at the Parish Church on Ashe Street in Youghal.  While locking the premises late one night - - he decided to close the mortuary first.  This is like a small church beside the big one and is where bodies in coffins were kept overnight.  It has its own big doors and can be locked separately. On this night - -there was a coffin in it - - otherwise it would have been closed already.  He had just blown out the six large candles around the coffin and was alone now in real darkness.  Then he felt a tap on his shoulder from behind.  Knowing that he was alone - - he nearly dropped dead with the awful fright that he got.  Summoning all his energy to get out the door - - he turned around to find a man standing there.  It was Tommy Hannon from Mill Road who had come late to say a prayer for the deceased and was standing behind the door when Liam arrived in.  There were more than prayers said that night! 

And the last tale today tells of a famous character - - Billy Swayne - - taking a short-cut across North Abbey cemetery in the dark - - when he fell into a newly dug grave and couldn’t get back up.  He started shouting and was heard by Hannah O’Callaghan - - who lived in the graveyard lodge at the gate.  She was living alone at this time - -her husband had died a few months before that.  Brave woman that she was - - she went up to investigate the awful screeching - -saw Billy and used the nearby ladder to help him out.  A real live ghost! 

Story by Mike Hackett (A real ghost).
Picture: St. Michael Church, Templemichael by @Kieran McCarthy

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Teresa Casey

Yes temple Michael is most def haunted.. my late grandfather saw plenty the ghost or two down in ardsallagh quay in his fishing days too….great stories Mike

Great story's which I adore my late father told many .thank you for sharing

I heard the story about the man who got a heart attack while digging a grave and being brought out. He was a neighbour of mine? Wont mention his name.

Great tales there Michael Hackett x

Great stories Mike Thank you 🙏

Brilliant stories..

Brilliant stories mike.

Loved these stories thank you .

Brilliant stories.

Great story

Great stories Mike!

Michael your a legend.

Richard Morrison

Ann Swayne,Carol Leo Dursun Billy Swyane mentioned in this have a read😍

Great stories

Great stories Mike

Great stories 👍👍

Aimee O'Brien another one to add to your story's from youghal

John Daly Charmaine Daly Jason Daly Marcie Twomey

Great stories Mike thanks for sharing.

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7 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

Picture shows the old neon sign over the The Nook pub on North Main Street, Youghal, back in 1972. Back in the seventies the neon signs became very fashionable with their colourful glow advertising the local pubs and business shops. It was a time when the town was booming with tourists arriving by the thousands from the Cork to Youghal train and huge employment with local factories like Youghal Carpets, Seafield Fabrics, Blackwater Cottons and Murray Kitchens.

The cheerful lights gave the town a metropolitan look and a sign that prosperity was finally here after the austere era post WW2. Do you remember any of the colourful signs over the shops fronts in the past? If so please share your thoughts in the comment box below.
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Picture shows the old neon sign over the The Nook pub on North Main Street, Youghal, back in 1972. Back in the seventies the neon signs became very fashionable with their colourful glow advertising the local pubs and business shops. It was a time when the town was booming with tourists arriving by the thousands from the Cork to Youghal train and huge employment with local factories like Youghal Carpets, Seafield Fabrics, Blackwater Cottons and Murray Kitchens.

The cheerful lights gave the town a metropolitan look and a sign that prosperity was finally here after the austere era post WW2. Do you remember any of the colourful signs over the shops fronts in the past? If so please share your thoughts in the comment box below.

Comment on Facebook

I remember the neon sign over the Pick n Chicken and the Old Kentucky Restaurant and of course the famous Ocean Lounge. Loved those signs but are probably considered tacky now?

Julie Ní T

Anne Barry

1 week ago

YoughalOnline.com

YOUGHAL PEOPLE – YOUGHAL STORIES – YOUGHAL PLACES
Micky Hackett – – – My Granda
Michael (Micky) Hackett was born in Ballyphilip near Knockanore, West Waterford in 1888. We know that he had two brothers – one was delicate and died of T.B. at a young age – – while the other went to live in Ardee County Louth and lived out his life there. He also had two sisters and they too died young. Michael (Micky) stayed in the local area (including Mill Road) for his lifetime.
At first in Ballyphilip – the family lived (late 1800s) by salmon fishing and the benefits that the country-side brought like growing their own potatoes, catching rabbits and plenty of firewood. Then as the family grew bigger, more work and income was needed, and so they moved in to the outskirts of Youghal around 1910 – first to Cork Hill and then to Mill Road. Not long afterwards, the delicate brother, Patsy, died. It was a time of sadness for the Hackett family as one of the sisters, Mary, died on Cork Hill when she fell from a horse and cart at twelve years of age. The other sister later died at fifteen years of age. Micky’s remaining brother, Johnny, moved up to the north of Ireland and joined the R.I.C. – while Micky got a job at the Youghal Brickyard driving the newly arrived German steam lorry. Their father (Daddy Mick) also got a job at the Brickyard.
Michael, or Micky as he became known, married Ellen Kenefick of Mill Road in 1916. His boss, J.R.Smyth owner of the Brickyard, gave the young newly-married couple the lodge at Heathfield Towers main gates to live in. Heathfield Towers was the castle-type big house in which the Smyth family lived on the hill above the Tourig valley where the Brickyard was located. One of the big chimneys (three originally) is still standing and can be seen from the main road.
Micky and Ellen went on to have six children in that lodge: Michael, Hanny, Paddy, Johnny, Minnie and Denis. Although J.R.Smyth meant well when he gave them use of the lodge, it was to be the cause of the death of Ellen. The lodge is set in a hollow next to the gate and beside a small river. In those days you had no such thing as a damp-proof course and it must have been weeping dampness on the inside walls. T.B. was widespread then and Ellen was struck down with it when her sixth child Denis was only one year old. It was 1932 and the Eucharistic Congress was on in Dublin. For some reason, a black flag was picked as the symbol for celebrating the Congress and every house flew one from a window or on the chimney. Dick Cunningham, who lived near the lodge remembered that on the day that Ellen passed away, the black flag was removed from the lodge chimney and he knew then that she was gone. Micky then got a new cottage at Knockatigan nearby – where he spent the rest of his days.
It must have been hard to manage six children, aged fifteen down to one, without a mother and so Hanny left school at fourteen to become the house-keeper. The eldest child, Michael, then went to Mill Road to live with his Granny (Nanny Han, wife of Daddy Mick). He was also shared with Din and Mary Murphy (next door) – they were sister and brother to Nanny Han. Michael called her Auntie Mary – although she was really his Gran-Aunt.
Meanwhile back at Knockatigan, Micky was working every day at driving the steam lorry to the Youghal railway station with full brick loads and using three trailers in the process. While one trailer was being loaded at the Brickyard, another was being unloaded at the station, with the third on the road being towed behind the lorry. Many were the stories told about the local drapers quickly removing their dresses and suits (hanging in front of the shops) before the steam lorry blowing soot (like a railway engine) ruined them all. Micky would blow the loud steam hooter to warn drapers as he slowly drove through the main streets. Not forgetting that during those years – Hanny was acting as mother to Paddy, Johnny, Minnie and Denis.
Micky worked long and hard to rear his children and in the Springtime and Summertime he could be seen tilling the land that was beside his house. As he was the first to use it to grow potatoes and vegetables, it had a lot of rocks and stones through it. He would toil with pick-axe and shovel in the evenings to make it fit for the seeds. As it happened – a character who lived up the road would saunter by most evenings on his way to town for a few pints of porter. On witnessing Micky swinging the pick-axe he would comment “It’s tough Micky – the land is like iron”. Then the next night he would make the same remark “Like iron it is Micky”. Micky well knew how hard the land was and he was fed up with the character’s stupid observations night after night. Eventually the character changed his tune and said “It’s like iron Micky – what are you going to grow there?” Micky had enough!
“I’m going to plant six-inch nails” said Micky “And with all that iron that you’re talking about, they’ll grow into crowbars”
Apart from bringing bricks to the railway station, one of Micky’s last points of delivery was to the site of the District Hospital that was completed in 1932 and is now known as the Community Hospital. That was a bigger task than imagined because the loaded steam-lorry could not possibly climb up the very steep Cork Hill while pulling a loaded trailer as well. He had to drive it out via the Strand and Summerfield, then up the New-Line and on to Cork Hill from the upper side. Micky – in later life – liked to say that he was very involved in the building of the District Hospital and that he had never in his life been a patient in it.
The Youghal Brickyard ceased production in 1930 – concrete blocks were taking over the building sites and there was no great demand for bricks anymore. J.R.Smyth, the Brickyard owner, built a small chimney and kiln near his Heathfield Towers but that too ceased in 1936. All through this he was keen to encourage and support Micky and he kept him as an employee for some time after the closure. Micky would drive the family car and do the gardening around the Smyth home of Heathfield Towers.
A while later, Micky went to work for Tommy Murray and Sons builders. He became an expert at knocking trees and could lie them in lines, in any direction from standing positions. Murrays then had a sawmill in New-Catherine Street, near Green’s Quay, where a man named Jim Parker would saw the huge trunks on a saw bench to make boards for new houses. One of Micky’s more memorable achievements in that regard was when he was entrusted to knock enormous oak trees that were growing on the fringe of the high quarry in which the Youghal Parish church is located. The quarry location for the church came about when in 1796 the Orange men of Youghal would not allow it to be built on any main thoroughfare of the town. Subsequently, the trees on the surrounding land got bigger and bigger until they overhung the church roof and would possibly demolish it in a storm. Murrays got the contract to remove them and Micky Hackett and his crew managed to cut them down, using cross-cut saws and block-and-tackle supports, without damaging a slate.
And then at last came a break for Micky when the new Seafield Fabrics (1947) looked for boiler-men to run that outside additional (boiler-house) part of the factory. Micky was very experienced at steam control and management from his years driving the Youghal Brickyard steam-lorry and he got one of the two jobs.
He would cycle the three miles from Knockatigan to the ‘factory’ in all weathers and home again after his shift. The boiler-house was kept working around the clock and some of the shifts meant night-work. Micky would cycle to town early when starting a shift at ten pm, and have a pint in Paddy Maher’s or John Kenneddy’s pub, He would then purchase two large bottles of stout and place them carefully in his big over-coat pockets before mounting his bike to cycle to work. He said that he needed the two bottles (one in each pocket) to help keep him balanced on the bike. Then a few of his work colleagues used to call him ‘Two Lamps’ as he had two lamps on his bike. One was a regular battery lamp but the second one was a carbite lamp which was lit by carbite pellets with drops of water falling on them to create gas. After that a simple match started the process. The carbite was hard to get but Jumbo Perks of the amusements would get it for Micky whenever he ran short. Jumbo would call to visit Micky a few times every year to discuss steam and engine problems.
Micky cycled and worked until he was seventy-five years of age, which was permissible at that time. He retired in 1963.
Micky Hackett – who had been reared in Ballyphilip, Knockanore – died in January 1977 at the age of eighty-nine and is buried in North Abbey. We remember him as a calm placid man who was much sought for his wit and stories – especially in later times when he had the few bob and freedom to have a pint or a large bottle. God rest him.
This first appeared in the Knockanore Historical Annual No.5 in December 2020.
-Grandson Mike Hackett.

Photo: Youghal Brickyard staff – Micky at back left – near ladder.
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YOUGHAL PEOPLE - YOUGHAL STORIES - YOUGHAL PLACES
Micky Hackett  - - - My Granda
Michael (Micky) Hackett was born in Ballyphilip near Knockanore, West Waterford in 1888.  We know that he had two brothers - one was delicate and died of T.B. at a young age - - while the other went to live in Ardee County Louth and lived out his life there. He also had two sisters and they too died young.   Michael (Micky) stayed in the local area (including Mill Road) for his lifetime. 
At first in Ballyphilip  - the family lived (late 1800s) by salmon fishing and the benefits that the country-side brought like growing their own potatoes, catching rabbits and plenty of firewood.  Then as the family grew bigger, more work and income was needed, and so they moved in to the outskirts of Youghal around 1910 - first to Cork Hill and then to Mill Road.  Not long afterwards, the delicate brother, Patsy, died.  It was a time of sadness for the Hackett family as one of the sisters, Mary, died on Cork Hill when she fell from a horse and cart at twelve years of age.  The other sister later died at fifteen years of age.  Micky’s remaining brother, Johnny, moved up to the north of Ireland and joined the R.I.C. - while Micky  got a job at the Youghal Brickyard driving the newly arrived German steam lorry.  Their father (Daddy Mick) also got a job at the Brickyard.  
Michael, or Micky as he became known, married Ellen Kenefick of Mill Road in 1916.  His boss, J.R.Smyth owner of the Brickyard, gave the young newly-married couple the lodge at Heathfield Towers main gates to live in.  Heathfield Towers was the castle-type big house in which the Smyth family lived on the hill above the Tourig valley where the Brickyard was located.  One of the big chimneys (three originally) is still standing and can be seen from the main road.  
Micky and Ellen went on to have six children in that lodge: Michael, Hanny, Paddy, Johnny, Minnie and Denis.  Although J.R.Smyth meant well when he gave them use of the lodge, it was to be the cause of the death of Ellen.  The lodge is set in a hollow next to the gate and beside a small river.  In those days you had no such thing as a damp-proof course and it must have been weeping dampness on the inside walls.  T.B. was widespread then and Ellen was struck down with it when her sixth child Denis was only one year old.  It was 1932 and the Eucharistic Congress was on in Dublin.  For some reason, a black flag was picked as the symbol for celebrating the Congress and every house flew one from a window or on the chimney.  Dick Cunningham, who lived near the lodge remembered that on the day that Ellen passed away, the black flag was removed from the lodge chimney and he knew then that she was gone.   Micky then got a new cottage at Knockatigan nearby  - where he spent the rest of his days.  
It must have been hard to manage six children, aged fifteen down to one, without a mother and so Hanny left school at fourteen to become the house-keeper.  The eldest child, Michael, then went to Mill Road to live with his Granny (Nanny Han, wife of Daddy Mick).  He was also shared with Din and Mary Murphy (next door)  - they were sister and brother to Nanny Han.  Michael called her Auntie Mary - although she was really his Gran-Aunt.
Meanwhile back at Knockatigan, Micky was working every day at driving the steam lorry to the Youghal railway station with full brick loads and using three trailers in the process.  While one trailer was being loaded at the Brickyard, another was being unloaded at the station, with the third on the road being towed behind the lorry.  Many were the stories told about the local drapers quickly removing their dresses and suits (hanging in front of the shops) before the steam lorry blowing soot (like a railway engine) ruined them all.  Micky would blow the loud steam hooter to warn drapers as he slowly drove through the main streets. Not forgetting that during those years - Hanny was acting as mother to Paddy, Johnny, Minnie and Denis.  
Micky worked long and hard to rear his children and in the Springtime and Summertime he could be seen tilling the land that was beside his house.  As he was the first to use it to grow potatoes and vegetables, it had a lot of rocks and stones through it.  He would toil with pick-axe and shovel in the evenings to make it fit for the seeds. As it happened  - a character who lived up the road would saunter by most evenings on his way to town for a few pints of porter.  On witnessing Micky swinging the pick-axe he would comment “It’s tough Micky - the land is like iron”. Then the next night he would make the same remark “Like iron it is Micky”.  Micky well knew how hard the land was and he was fed up with the character’s stupid observations night after night.  Eventually the character changed his tune and said “It’s like iron Micky - what are you going to grow there?”  Micky had enough!  
“I’m going to plant six-inch nails” said Micky  “And with all that iron that you’re talking about, they’ll grow into crowbars”
Apart from bringing bricks to the railway station, one of Micky’s last points of delivery was to the site of the District Hospital that was completed in 1932 and is now known as the Community Hospital.   That was a bigger task than imagined because the loaded steam-lorry could not possibly climb up the very steep Cork Hill while pulling a loaded trailer as well. He had to drive it out via the Strand and Summerfield, then up the New-Line and on to Cork Hill from the upper side.   Micky - in later life - liked to say that he was very involved in the building of the District Hospital and that he had never in his life been a patient in it.  
The Youghal Brickyard ceased production in 1930 - concrete blocks were taking over the building sites and there was no great demand for bricks anymore.  J.R.Smyth, the Brickyard owner, built a small chimney and kiln near his Heathfield Towers but that too ceased in 1936.  All through this he was keen to encourage and support Micky and he kept him as an employee for some time after the closure.  Micky would drive the family car and do the gardening around the Smyth home of Heathfield Towers.  
A while later, Micky went to work for Tommy Murray and Sons builders.  He became an expert at knocking trees and could lie them in lines, in any direction  from standing positions.  Murrays then had a sawmill in New-Catherine Street, near Green’s Quay, where a man named Jim Parker would saw the huge trunks on a saw bench to make boards for new houses.  One of Micky’s more memorable achievements in that regard was when he was entrusted to knock enormous oak trees that were growing on the fringe of the high quarry in which the Youghal Parish church is located.  The quarry location for the church came about when in 1796 the Orange men of Youghal would not allow it to be built on any main thoroughfare of the town.  Subsequently, the trees on the surrounding land got bigger and bigger until they overhung the church roof and would possibly demolish it in a storm.  Murrays got the contract to remove them and Micky Hackett and his crew managed to cut them down, using cross-cut saws and block-and-tackle supports, without damaging a slate.  
And then at last came a break for Micky when the new Seafield Fabrics (1947) looked for boiler-men to run that outside additional (boiler-house) part of the factory.  Micky was very experienced at steam control and management from his years driving the Youghal Brickyard steam-lorry and he got one of the two jobs.   
He would cycle the three miles from Knockatigan to the ‘factory’ in all weathers and home again after his shift.  The boiler-house was kept working around the clock and some of the shifts meant night-work.  Micky would cycle to town early when starting a shift at ten pm, and have a pint in Paddy Maher’s or John Kenneddy’s pub,  He would then purchase two large bottles of stout and place them carefully in his big over-coat pockets before mounting his bike to cycle to work.  He said that he needed the two bottles (one in each pocket)  to help keep him balanced on the bike.  Then a few of his work colleagues used to call him ‘Two Lamps’ as he had two lamps on his bike.  One was a regular battery lamp but the second one was a carbite lamp which was lit by carbite pellets with drops of water falling on them to create gas. After that a simple match started the process.  The carbite was hard to get but Jumbo Perks of the amusements would get it for Micky whenever he ran short.  Jumbo would call to visit Micky a few times every year to discuss steam and engine problems.
Micky cycled and worked until he was seventy-five years of age, which was permissible at that time.  He retired in 1963.
Micky Hackett - who had been reared in Ballyphilip, Knockanore  - died in January 1977 at the age of eighty-nine and is buried in North Abbey.  We remember him as a calm placid man who was much sought for his wit and stories - especially in later times when he had the few bob and freedom to have a pint or a large bottle.  God rest him. 
This first appeared in the Knockanore Historical Annual No.5 in December 2020.
-Grandson Mike Hackett.

Photo: Youghal Brickyard staff - Micky at back left - near ladder.

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Lovely story and very interesting

Is that the chimney visible from the bypass road?

1 week ago

YoughalOnline.com

The Tricolour flies high at the 1916 commemoration plaque in Raheen Park, Youghal, to mark the 105th anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising. See MoreSee Less

The Tricolour flies high at the 1916 commemoration plaque in Raheen Park, Youghal, to mark the 105th anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising.

1 week ago

YoughalOnline.com

The Wayfarer By Pádraig Pearse
This was the last poem written by Pearse on the eve of his execution at Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin (May 2, 1916). Storyteller Pat Lynch of Fox’s Lane Folk Museum, Youghal, read the poem as a fitting tribute on the centenary of the Easter Rising. Recorded on the 26th March 2016.

The Wayfarer by Pádraig Pearse

The beauty of the world hath made me sad,
This beauty that will pass;
Sometimes my heart hath shaken with great joy

To see a leaping squirrel in a tree,
Or a red lady-bird upon a stalk,
Or little rabbits in a field at evening,
Lit by a slanting sun,
Or some green hill where shadows drifted by
Some quiet hill where mountainy man hath sown
And soon would reap; near to the gate of Heaven;

Or children with bare feet upon the sands
Of some ebbed sea, or playing on the streets
Of little towns in Connacht,
Things young and happy.
And then my heart hath told me:
These will pass,
Will pass and change, will die and be no more,
Things bright and green, things young and happy;
And I have gone upon my way
Sorrowful.
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Brilliant

Powerful stuff Pat

Nice touch pat – and love the background

Beautiful recitation Pat. Thank you. 💚

Mary power

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2 weeks ago

YoughalOnline.com

EASTER SUNDAY 2021 – YOUGHAL – CO. CORK
Daniel, Katia and Pedro from Youghal and Brazil enjoying Easter Sunday at Youghal beach. Feliz Páscoa! (Happy Easter!)
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EASTER  SUNDAY 2021 - YOUGHAL - CO. CORK
Daniel, Katia and Pedro from Youghal and Brazil enjoying Easter Sunday at Youghal beach. Feliz Páscoa! (Happy Easter!)

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Happy Easter Katia and Daniel

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