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17 minutes ago

YoughalOnline.com

HAPPY 4TH JULY TO ALL OUR AMERICAN FRIENDS FROM ALL IN YOUGHAL.

Have a really wonderful day to all our American viewers in the states and also huge birthday wishes to our local radio station Community Radio Youghal – CRY104FM who are celebrating 41 years of broadcasting since their first broadcast from Connolly’s Attic on the Golf Links Road way back on the 4th July 1979.

You can listen to the station by clicking this link Cry Youghal
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HAPPY 4TH JULY TO ALL OUR AMERICAN FRIENDS FROM ALL IN YOUGHAL.

Have a really wonderful day to all our American viewers in the states and also huge birthday wishes to our local radio station Community Radio Youghal - CRY104FM who are celebrating 41 years of broadcasting since their first broadcast from Connollys Attic on the Golf Links Road way back on the 4th July 1979.

You can listen to the station by clicking this link Cry Youghal

36 minutes ago

YoughalOnline.com

HAPPY 4TH JULY TO ALL OUR AMERICAN FRIENDS FROM ALL IN YOUGHAL – Pictured is the US Flag flying high on the sail ship during the filming of Moby Dick in Youghal Harbour, Co Cork, back in 1954.

Of interest to local viewers – The silhouette of the people standing on the ‘Widow’s Walk’ on the rooftop of the building is Mrs. Buttimer and her son Christy Buttimer waving as the ‘Pequod’ sailed out of the harbour on its epic voyage in the search for Moby Dick.

Have a really wonderful day to all our American viewers in the states and also huge birthday wishes to our local radio station Community Radio Youghal – CRY104FM who are celebrating 41 years of broadcasting since their first broadcast from Connolly’s Attic on the Golf Links Road way back on the 4th July 1979.

You can listen to the station by clicking this link Cry Youghal
See MoreSee Less

HAPPY 4TH JULY TO ALL OUR AMERICAN FRIENDS FROM ALL IN YOUGHAL - Pictured is the US Flag flying high on the sail ship during the filming of Moby Dick in Youghal Harbour, Co Cork, back in 1954.

Of interest to local viewers - The silhouette of the people standing on the Widows Walk on the rooftop of the building is Mrs. Buttimer and her son Christy Buttimer waving as the Pequod sailed out of the harbour on its epic voyage in the search for Moby Dick.

Have a really wonderful day to all our American viewers in the states and also huge birthday wishes to our local radio station Community Radio Youghal - CRY104FM who are celebrating 41 years of broadcasting since their first broadcast from Connollys Attic on the Golf Links Road way back on the 4th July 1979.

You can listen to the station by clicking this link Cry Youghal

38 minutes ago

YoughalOnline.com

HAPPY 4TH JULY TO ALL OUR AMERICAN FRIENDS FROM ALL IN YOUGHAL – Pictured is the US Flag flying high on the sail ship during the filming of Moby Dick in Youghal Harbour, Co Cork, back in 1954.

Of interest to local viewers – The silhouette of the people standing on the ‘Widow’s Walk’ on the rooftop of the building is Mrs. Buttimer and her son Christy Buttimer waving as the ‘Pequod’ sailed out of the harbour on its epic voyage in the search for Moby Dick.

Have a really wonderful day to all our American viewers in the states and also huge birthday wishes to our local radio station Community Radio Youghal – CRY104FM who are celebrating 41 years of broadcasting since their first broadcast from Connolly’s Attic on the Golf Links Road way back on the 4th July 1979.

You can listen to the station by clicking this link Cry Youghal
See MoreSee Less

HAPPY 4TH JULY TO ALL OUR AMERICAN FRIENDS FROM ALL IN YOUGHAL - Pictured is the US Flag flying high on the sail ship during the filming of Moby Dick in Youghal Harbour, Co Cork, back in 1954.

Of interest to local viewers - The silhouette of the people standing on the Widows Walk on the rooftop of the building is  Mrs. Buttimer and her son Christy Buttimer waving as the Pequod sailed out of the harbour on its epic voyage in the search for Moby Dick.

Have a really wonderful day to all our American viewers in the states and also huge birthday wishes to our local radio station Community Radio Youghal - CRY104FM who are celebrating 41 years of broadcasting since their first broadcast from Connollys Attic on the Golf Links Road way back on the 4th July 1979.

You can listen to the station by clicking this link Cry Youghal

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Andi and John Tobin 🇵🇷 😘

22 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

The S.S. ‘Ary’ by Mike Hackett

The steamship ‘Ary’ foundered during a raging storm/blizzard in February 1947 – – while on a voyage from Port Talbot in Wales to C.I.E. in Waterford with a cargo of coal. Many senior citizens will remember that winter as bringing the heaviest snow for decades. People living in the country-side could not get out of their houses and thousands of animals died in the fields.

Only one sailor of the ‘Ary’ lived to tell the story of the terrible end of the steam ship. Jan Dorucki (19 years) was washed ashore in one of the ship’s lifeboats at Mine Head, Old Parish near Dungarvan and this is the tale of his ordeal on the high seas.

The ‘Ary’ left Port Talbot, under Captain E Kolk and set a course for Waterford. The weather was bitterly cold with heavy seas running. Shortly after leaving Port Talbot – – the weather turned really foul with high winds and the sea became extremely rough. It was the beginning of the end for the ‘Ary’.
The precious cargo of coal began to shift – – due to the continuous buffeting of the waves – – thereby causing a list. The crew made frantic efforts to stop the coal from shifting – – but to no avail. The list was now increasing rapidly.
The Captain gave the order to his crew to abandon ship and two lifeboats were lowered into the raging ocean. But the boats had only barely moved away from the now foundering vessel when she suddenly dived to a watery grave – – leaving her crew to the mercy of the elements. Then to their awful horror – – when they thought that things could not get worse – – there were no oars, sails, engine or food on board.

They drifted and drifted in the high seas and the terrible cold. Jan Dorucki pulled a tarpaulin over his head in an effort to escape the worst – – and soon he was in a deep sleep. When he awoke at dawn – – the scene was shocking. His companions in the lifeboat were all dead – – having succumbed during the night in temperatures below zero. Jan became very nervous with all dead men on board and so he began to push them into the sea.

With sleet and rain still falling – – the boat began to drift in towards sheer cliffs at Old Parish in County Waterford. Although suffering from severe frostbite – – he staggered out of the open boat when it struck the rocks. Then with his strength failing – – he began to climb the cliff face – – a seemingly impossible task. He succeeded in reaching the cliff top and crawled in an exhausted condition to a nearby household. Jan Dorucki thought at first that he had landed in France – – and it was when he reached the home of the Hourigan family that he found it was Ireland. Mr. Hourigan attended to his immediate needs and then conveyed him to Dungarvan hospital for medical treatment.

When Jan was examined at the hospital – – an awful discovery was made – – the frostbite was extremely severe and gangrene was setting into his legs. The medical staff did everything possible for the brave determined survivor of the ship wreck – – but in the end – – the legs had to be amputated. The operation was carried out successfully and now he had to learn to walk again. A set of artificial legs were obtained and after several months – – he took his first steps outside the hospital. Jan went back home to Poland eventually — and sadly all contact with him was lost.

During the week after the ship wreck – – bodies were washed up along the West Waterford shoreline. Garda Sergeant Gallagher was the man to organise the search parties and collect the bodies. They were laid out in the Fire Station at Ardmore in what witnesses described as a harrowing scene. All were buried in St. Declan’s cemetery in Ardmore – – in a special plot – – not far from the famous Round Tower.

We move from then (1947) on to 1977 – – when Kevin Gallagher (son of the Garda Sergeant) returned from England. He went to visit the grave of the sailors of the ‘S.S.Ary’ that his father had been so involved in – – and he was very disappointed at the condition of it. Kevin resolved to make it a fitting and respectable place-of-rest for the fifteen crew of the ship who are buried there. The people from all over the West Waterford coast chipped in to pay for the upgrading of the mass grave. James Kiely, of Kiely Undertakers Dungarvan, made a big donation that resulted in a fine headstone being unveiled in November 1977. At that time – – every effort was made to locate Jan Dorucki in Poland before the event but no trace could be found. It would have been so nice and of course very emotional to have him attend it. Kevin Gallagher died in 2005 – – leaving a fine memorial to the crew of sailors from Poland, Spain, Wales and England.

We move on again to the year 2000 – – when another piece of the jigsaw fell into place. Mrs. Annie Lonergan from Sarsfield Terrace in Youghal told of being in Dungarvan Hospital in 1947 when Jan Dorucki was brought in. She was astounded at how jovial he was – – having lost his legs – – and it made her see life from a different angle. Annie remembered him going across the dining room by jumping on his bottom from chair to chair around by the walls. Annie (nee Condon) was originally from Ballygunner in Waterford City and passed away in December 2001. A few years ago, I was collecting my grand-daughter Tia from Ballygunner National School – – and while I was waiting at the gate a man asked me where did I live. When I said between Ardmore and Youghal – – he asked me if I knew Annie Lonergan. “I sure do” I replied. He then went on to point to a house about three fields away. “That house” he went on to say “Was where Annie (Condon) was born and reared”. He turned out to be a cousin of hers. It’s a small world!

Thanks to John Young for helping me with this story and for presenting me with his ‘Maritime History of Dungarvan. Thanks also to Tony Gallagher for the photos and to Jacinta Lonergan and her sister Anne in Australia for confirmation about her mother Annie’s involvement.
– Mike Hackett.

The picture shows the young Lonergan family of Sarsfield Terrace, Youghal, and group photo of Annie Lonergan ( in the centre wearing glasses) with family, friends, and neighbours at a social event back in the 1974.
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The S.S. ‘Ary’ by Mike Hackett 

The steamship ‘Ary’ foundered during a raging storm/blizzard in February 1947 - - while on a voyage from Port Talbot in Wales to C.I.E. in Waterford with a cargo of coal.  Many senior citizens will remember that winter as bringing the heaviest snow for decades. People living in the country-side could not get out of their houses and thousands of animals died in the fields.

Only one sailor of the ‘Ary’ lived to tell the story of the terrible end of the steam ship.  Jan Dorucki (19 years) was washed ashore in one of the ship’s lifeboats at Mine Head, Old Parish near Dungarvan and this is the tale of his ordeal on the high seas.

The ‘Ary’ left Port Talbot, under Captain E Kolk and set a course for Waterford.  The weather was bitterly cold with heavy seas running.  Shortly after leaving Port Talbot - - the weather turned really foul with high winds and the sea became extremely rough.  It was the beginning of the end for the ‘Ary’. 
The precious cargo of coal began to shift - - due to the continuous buffeting of the waves - - thereby causing a list.  The crew made frantic efforts to stop the coal from shifting - - but to no avail.  The list was now increasing rapidly.
The Captain gave the order to his crew to abandon ship and two lifeboats were lowered into the raging ocean.  But the boats had only barely moved away from the now foundering vessel when she suddenly dived to a watery grave - - leaving her crew to the mercy of the elements.  Then to their awful horror - - when they thought that things could not get worse - - there were no oars, sails, engine or food on board.  

They drifted and drifted in the high seas and the terrible cold.  Jan Dorucki pulled a tarpaulin over his head in an effort to escape the worst - - and soon he was in a deep sleep.  When he awoke at dawn - - the scene was shocking.  His companions in the lifeboat were all dead - - having succumbed during the night in temperatures below zero.  Jan became very nervous with all dead men on board and so he began to push them into the sea.  

With sleet and rain still falling - - the boat began to drift in towards sheer cliffs at Old Parish in County Waterford.  Although suffering from severe frostbite - - he staggered out of the open boat when it struck the rocks.  Then with his strength failing - - he began to climb the cliff face - - a seemingly impossible task.  He succeeded in reaching the cliff top and crawled in an exhausted condition to a nearby household.  Jan Dorucki thought at first that he had landed in France - - and it was when he reached the home of the Hourigan family that he found it was Ireland.  Mr. Hourigan attended to his immediate needs and then conveyed him to Dungarvan hospital for medical treatment.  

When Jan was examined at the hospital - - an awful discovery was made - - the frostbite was extremely severe and gangrene was setting into his legs. The medical staff did everything possible for the brave determined survivor of the ship wreck - - but in the end - - the legs had to be amputated.  The operation was carried out successfully and now he had to learn to walk again.  A set of artificial legs were obtained and after several months - - he took his first steps outside the hospital.  Jan went back home to Poland eventually -- and sadly all contact with him was lost.  

During the week after the ship wreck - - bodies were washed up along the West Waterford shoreline.  Garda Sergeant Gallagher was the man to organise the search parties and collect the bodies.  They were laid out in the Fire Station at Ardmore in what witnesses described as a harrowing scene.  All were buried in St. Declan’s cemetery in Ardmore - - in a special plot - - not far from the famous Round Tower.  

We move from then (1947) on to 1977 - - when Kevin Gallagher (son of the Garda Sergeant) returned from England. He went to visit the grave of the sailors of the ‘S.S.Ary’ that his father had been so involved in - - and he was very disappointed at the condition of it.  Kevin resolved to make it a fitting and respectable place-of-rest for the fifteen crew of the ship who are buried there.  The people from all over the West Waterford coast chipped in to pay for the upgrading of the mass grave.  James Kiely, of Kiely Undertakers Dungarvan, made a big donation that resulted in a fine headstone being unveiled in November 1977.  At that time - - every effort was made to locate Jan Dorucki in Poland before the event but no trace could be found.  It would have been so nice and of course very emotional to have him attend it.  Kevin Gallagher died in 2005 - - leaving a fine memorial to the crew of sailors from Poland, Spain, Wales and England. 

We move on again to the year 2000 - - when another piece of the jigsaw fell into place.  Mrs. Annie Lonergan from Sarsfield Terrace in Youghal told of being in Dungarvan Hospital in 1947 when Jan Dorucki was brought in.  She was astounded at how jovial he was - - having lost his legs - - and it made her see life from a different angle.  Annie remembered him going across the dining room by jumping on his bottom from chair to chair around by the walls.  Annie (nee Condon) was originally from Ballygunner in Waterford City and passed away in December 2001.  A few years ago, I was collecting my grand-daughter Tia from Ballygunner National School - - and while I was waiting at the gate a man asked me where did I live.  When I said between Ardmore and Youghal - - he asked me if I knew Annie Lonergan.  “I sure do” I replied.  He then went on to point to a house about three fields away.  “That house” he went on to say “Was where Annie (Condon) was born and reared”.  He turned out to be a cousin of hers.   It’s a small world!

Thanks to John Young for helping me with this story and for presenting me with his ‘Maritime History of Dungarvan.  Thanks also to Tony Gallagher for the photos and to Jacinta Lonergan and her sister Anne in Australia for confirmation about her mother Annie’s involvement. 
- Mike Hackett.

The picture shows the young Lonergan family of Sarsfield Terrace, Youghal, and group photo of Annie Lonergan ( in the centre wearing glasses) with family, friends, and neighbours at a social event back in the 1974.Image attachmentImage attachment

Comment on Facebook

Great story

Such a great story. Annie was such a lovely person too ❤

Love ur storys so interesting 👋👋👋❤️

Very interesting enjoyed reading it. Thank you Mike.

Very interesting story Michael Hackett one of Youghal’s finest gentlemen thank you

Very interesting story Michael thank you 😊

I think the surname may not be spelt correctly and this could have hampered efforts to find Jan?

Wow xx

Tracey Savage your Nan is in this x

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24 hours ago

YoughalOnline.com

The short clip shows a slow pan across North Main Street in Youghal sometime before the 1940s. On the left, you can see the old Merrick’s building and on the right, you can see Pasley’s shop beside Barretts.

If you have memories of North or South Main Street in town please consider leaving a comment below and help keep the town’s history, culture, and heritage alive.
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Comment on Facebook

Really busy back then, great to see 🤗

I grew up in Castlemartyr and my mother bought alot of her clothes in Merricks.

David Walsh

Nice to see, even today the town hasn’t changed much which is lovely

Amazing wonderful old town I love it so much my town

Brilliant so many Horses And K. Shoes .

That's was brilliant 👏👏

This is amazing….

It looked fab back then

Fabulous

Great record.

Noreen Small Len Lanigan Lynne Lanigan

Alan Guiry show Padjoe

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Good Old Ireland by Mike Hackett
If you are finding it hard to accept Lock-Down – – – then read the following story and appreciate how well-off we are nowadays compared to some people who lived in the country-side only fifty years ago. They had little enough, worked hard – – – but were very contented.

Some years ago, in Shanacoole near Piltown, lived a brother and sister named Patsy and Maggie French. Their house was in the middle of the land – – via a long boreen of about half-a-mile from the road. This was back in the 1960s – – not too long ago. It was a thatched house without water or electricity – – – and it had the old Irish traditional half-door. The scene could have easily been a century before that – – – as in the 1860s. Their light was a tilly lamp – – – worked by paraffin oil and sometimes they had just a candle. That was in Winter time but in Spring and Summer, they went to bed early at sundown.

Such a peaceful life in the real middle of the country. Patsy would do a bit of thatching on the roof when it was needed. I remember saying to him one day, as he was thatching around the chimney, if he was going to do the whole roof. “Ah no” said he, “Sure it’ll do me for the few years I’ve left of my time”. His sister Maggie was very chatty and loved to see me arrive with a newspaper and the latest gossip from the town.
When one considers how removed they were from the hussle and bussle of modern life. There was no radio in the house and they got the Cork Examiner newspaper of yesterday from their neighbours (O’Connors) two fields away, when the neighbours were passing the French’s house on the boreen to get the cows from an outside field. Then if Waterford were playing a hurling match, Patsy would go across the two fields to listen to the radio broadcast of Miceal O’Hehir at O’Connor’s house.

Following the Piltown Cross ambush on the British forces by the West Waterford I.R.A. Brigade – – -on 1st November 1920 – – – many searches of houses in the Piltown area took place during the following days. One of the raided houses was French’s of Shanacoole. Nobody knows how the British found it in the middle of the land – – – but they did. One of the French youths – – – a big strong lad – – – was picked upon by the Black and Tans and they started to man-handle him saying “You’re a fine strong youth and must have been involved in the ambush”. He had not been involved and denied all accusations. Then the officer in charge of the raiding party intervened and saved the young French youth from a bad beating.

Going to Mass at Piltown on Sunday meant cycling three miles for Patsy – – – down the boreen and past our house. While for Maggie, there was a two mile walk through the other side of the land to church. Firstly, via two fields to a parallel road, then down by Nora Shea’s post-office and then by Healy’s pub. In winter time – – – the women ( Maggie French and the O’Connor sisters, Mary and Bridie) who lived in the middle of the land had a simple plan for their footwear when going to Mass. They wore wellingtons through the grass tracks with their shoes in a bag. Then on reaching the roadway – – – they placed the wellies in a ditch and put on the shoes for the road and for in the church.
When Maggie was younger, she would go the four miles to Youghal town on a donkey and cart to do the shopping on a Saturday. Then if the potatoe crop was good, she would bring a few bags of them to the shops to help pay for the groceries. The boreen was all grass and about six-foot wide – – – the wheels of the cart barely fitted between the two ditches.

As for the water supply; Patsy would go daily to a well about three fields away and fill two buckets from it for table use. All other water for washing and for the few animals would be taken from the rain barrels at the shed corners. The old people always said that the rain water was softer – – – easier on hands and clothes.
Patsy used to talk about the great Waterford hurling team of 1959 that won the All-Ireland. He kept wishing that they would win it soon again – – – but alas – – – we are still waiting and hoping that this will be their year.
Patsy was a great man to use a scyde and bill-hook to keep the sides of the boreen trimmed. He was glad when we built a little house nearby and we had a telephone when they were scarce in the country-side. Then after cutting my own grass with a lawnmower, I would cut the grass along the whole boreen. It would look so well – – – like a long golf green. The cutting required three trips up and down – — – six lines of cut. I was so sorry that a photo of it was not taken on a nice Summer evening when it would be looking so well. Cameras were few at the time.

Later in life – – – after Maggie and Patsy had passed away – – – I heard that the door-jams of their outhouses were made from the timber that came from the first Youghal bridge over the Blackwater. That bridge preceded the metal one and was made of larch. It stood in the river from 1833 to 1883 – – – fifty years. Seemingly larch timber lasts forever in water and the proof was the way it was used afterwards to make those door frames.

Patsy and Maggie lived a real old Irish life-style and were very happy and contented.
God be with them all and God be with the days.

– Story by Mike Hackett

The photo shows the boreen to the French house as it is today.

* Boreen or bohereen (Irish: bóithrín, meaning "a little road", is a country lane, or narrow, frequently unpaved, rural road in Ireland.

* The Tilley lamp was a pressurised lamp that used paraffin (kerosene) as a fuel in the base.
A fine spray of hot paraffin leaves through a fine jet at the top of the vapourising tube and on entering the mixing dome vapourises into a gas. … Inside the mantle the gas burns and causes the mantle to glow with a bright white light.

* Michael O’Hehir (1920-96) was a broadcaster and journalist.
His voice was to become synonymous with radio coverage of hurling and football, and his broadcasts were important to the thousands of people who gathered around radio sets in the 1940s and 1950s in Ireland and abroad. He covered major GAA matches from 1938 until 1985, when illness prevented him from covering his 100th All-Ireland final.
See MoreSee Less

Good Old Ireland by Mike Hackett
 If you are finding it hard to accept Lock-Down  - - - then read the following story and appreciate how well-off we are nowadays compared to some people who lived in the country-side only fifty years ago.  They had little enough, worked hard  - - - but were very contented.

Some years ago, in Shanacoole near Piltown, lived a brother and sister named Patsy and Maggie French.  Their house was in the middle of the land - - via a long boreen of about half-a-mile from the road.  This was back in the 1960s - - not too long ago.  It was a thatched house without water or electricity - - - and it had the old Irish traditional half-door.  The scene could have easily been a century before that  - - - as in the 1860s.  Their light was a tilly lamp - - - worked by paraffin oil and sometimes they had just a candle.  That was in Winter time but in Spring and Summer, they went to bed early at sundown.  

Such a peaceful life in the real middle of the country.  Patsy would do a bit of thatching on the roof when it was needed.  I remember saying to him one day, as he was thatching around the chimney, if he was going to do the whole roof.  “Ah no” said he, “Sure it’ll do me for the few years I’ve left of my time”.  His sister Maggie was very chatty and loved to see me arrive with a newspaper and the latest gossip from the town.  
When one considers how removed they were from the hussle and bussle of modern life.  There was no radio in the house and they got the Cork Examiner newspaper of yesterday from their neighbours (O’Connors) two fields away, when the neighbours were passing the French’s house on the boreen to get the cows from an outside field.  Then if Waterford were playing a hurling match, Patsy would go across the two fields to listen to the radio broadcast of Miceal O’Hehir at O’Connor’s house. 

Following the Piltown Cross ambush on the British forces by the West Waterford I.R.A. Brigade - - -on 1st November 1920 - - - many searches of houses in the Piltown area took place during the following days.  One of the raided houses was French’s of Shanacoole.  Nobody knows how the British found it in the middle of the land - - - but they did.  One of the French youths - - - a big strong lad - - - was picked upon by the Black and Tans and they started to man-handle him saying “You’re a fine strong youth and must have been involved in the ambush”.  He had not been involved and denied all accusations.  Then the officer in charge of the raiding party intervened and saved the young French youth from a bad beating.

Going to Mass at Piltown on Sunday meant cycling three miles for Patsy  - - - down the boreen and past our house.  While for Maggie, there was a two mile walk through the other side of the land to church. Firstly, via two fields to a parallel road, then down by Nora Shea’s post-office and then by Healy’s pub. In winter time  - - - the women ( Maggie French and the O’Connor sisters, Mary and Bridie) who lived in the middle of the land had a simple plan for their footwear when going to Mass.  They wore wellingtons through the grass tracks with their shoes in a bag.  Then on reaching the roadway - - - they placed the wellies in a ditch and put on the shoes for the road and for in the church.     
When Maggie was younger, she would go the four miles to Youghal town on a donkey and cart to do the shopping on a Saturday.  Then if the potatoe crop was good, she would bring a few bags of them to the shops to help pay for the groceries.  The boreen was all grass and about six-foot wide  - - - the wheels of the cart barely fitted between the two ditches.  

As for the water supply; Patsy would go daily to a well about three fields away and fill two buckets from it for table use.  All other water for washing and for the few animals would be taken from the rain barrels at the shed corners.  The old people always said that the rain water was softer - - - easier on hands and clothes.  
Patsy used to talk about the great Waterford hurling team of 1959 that won the All-Ireland.  He kept wishing that they would win it soon again - - - but alas - - - we are still waiting and hoping that this will be their year. 
Patsy was a great man to use a scyde and bill-hook to keep the sides of the boreen trimmed.  He was glad when we built a little house nearby and we had a telephone when they were scarce in the country-side.  Then after cutting my own grass with a lawnmower, I would cut the grass along the whole boreen.  It would look so well - - - like a long golf green.  The cutting required three trips up and down - -- - six lines of cut.  I was so sorry that a photo of it was not taken on a nice Summer evening when it would be looking so well.  Cameras were few at the time.  

Later in life  - - - after Maggie and Patsy had passed away - - - I heard that the door-jams of their outhouses were made from the timber that came from the first Youghal bridge over the Blackwater.  That bridge preceded the metal one and was made of larch.  It stood in the river from 1833 to 1883 - - - fifty years.  Seemingly larch timber lasts forever in water and the proof was the way it was used afterwards to make those door frames.  

Patsy and Maggie lived a real old Irish life-style and were very happy and contented. 
God be with them all and God be with the days.  

- Story by Mike Hackett

The photo shows the boreen to the French house as it is today.

* Boreen or bohereen (Irish: bóithrín, meaning a little road, is a country lane, or narrow, frequently unpaved, rural road in Ireland.

* The Tilley lamp was a pressurised lamp that used paraffin (kerosene) as a fuel in the base.
A fine spray of hot paraffin leaves through a fine jet at the top of the vapourising tube and on entering the mixing dome vapourises into a gas. ... Inside the mantle the gas burns and causes the mantle to glow with a bright white light.

* Michael O’Hehir (1920-96) was a broadcaster and journalist.
His voice was to become synonymous with radio coverage of hurling and football, and his broadcasts were important to the thousands of people who gathered around radio sets in the 1940s and 1950s in Ireland and abroad. He covered major GAA matches from 1938 until 1985, when illness prevented him from covering his 100th All-Ireland final.

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That’s such a beautiful story the simple things of life and the beauty of nature was so appreciated then well done michael we should be counting our blessings today for all we have thanks be to God

Great story loved it thank you

Lovely story very well told thank you 😊

Michael Hackett, Thank you for a very interesting depiction and description of country life in Ireland in former years, not too very long ago, as some of us will remember. Betty Sharp ( nee McCarthy).

Great work Michael Hackett ,,,your discription of their house ,,no electricity ,,,tilly lamp ,water from a well in our case in a good neighbours land ,,,,no inside loo ,,,living mostly off the land,,,turf we cut and saved on the mountain bog ,,,as the years progressed things got better ,,,,but still,,,, I long for simpler times

Great piece of History thank you Michael Hackett

Well done Mike, really brought back the old days

Make me feel old Mike feels like I lived these time having been born in 1944 xxx

Thank you for sharing this wonderful piece of history. T

What a lovely story of simpler times. Happy and Content. Thank You.

Thanks Michael. Love your stories and songs 🙂

Interesting writing Michael..

Thank you Mike Hackett. What a lovely description.

I grew up with many people who lived these simple lives and were very happy and always cheerful. Great story and a lovely reminder of past friends.

Very good to read I remember the times but we all were very happy with what we had music in most homes and enjoyment Hard times too but we got on with what we had 👏🏻☘

Very interesting Micheal 👏

A simple pure life.

Beautiful story Mike

Lovely story great times👍

Thanks for sharing.

Lovely story simple times

Very Interesting Michael

Lovely story thank you Michael

That's beautiful simplicity!!!!

Beautiful story Michael.

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2 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

Mayor of County Cork first undertaking in her new role is the extension of the Youghal Boardwalk – And that’s great news for the seaside town.

Newly elected Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr Mary Linehan Foley first undertaking in her new role was to sign the contract for the works, with a total value of €1.7M, with County Council’s Divisional Manager South, Valerie O’Sullivan and Director of Sorenson Civil Engineering Ltd., John Wallace.

The picture shows the present 400-metre boardwalk at Claycastle running parallel to the Blue Flag 2020 beach and the fabulous panoramic vista of the famous 5-kilometer golden sandy beach and blue sea. Pictured inset: Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr Mary Linehan Foley signing the contract – this was her first undertaking as Mayor.

Full Story Here:
Youghal Eco-Boardwalk Extension Works Get Underway

Youghal is set for another boost to its tourism offering as works get underway on the extension of the current 400 metre boardwalk at Claycastle beach onto Redbarn. The contract for the works, with a total value of €1.7M, was the first undertaking of newly elected Mayor of the County of Cork Cllr Mary Linehan Foley, a native of Youghal, Cork with County Council’s Divisional Manager South, Valerie O’Sullivan and Director of Sorenson Civil Engineering Ltd., John Wallace.

Once complete the route will form part of the National Coastal Walking Route and will span 1.9 kilometres. The Cork County Council project will significantly enhance the ‘beach experience’ for users, providing a formal pedestrian walkway from Redbarn beach into Youghal Town Centre, and is expected to be completed by October 2020.

This announcement comes following Cork County Council’s allocation of €500k for the extension under the Outdoor Recreation Infrastructure Scheme which is operated by the Department of Rural and Community Development. Phase 1 of the project has already been successfully delivered by Cork County Council in partnership with Fáilte Ireland. The current set of works will see the walkway run from Claycastle to Red Barn, adjacent to the dunes and reed beds of Ballyvergan Marsh. Completion of the route will improve access, enhancing the natural heritage experience of walkers, providing a permanent hard walking surface of a two-metre wide boardwalk which successfully facilitates easy access for wheelchair users and pushchairs.

Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr. Mary Linehan Foley, warmly welcomed the signing today, commenting,

“I am especially proud to sign this contact as County Mayor for what is a fantastic amenity in Youghal. The extension will see the original 400 metre boardwalk at Claycastle beach, which was completed in 2012 extended by 1.5km as far as Redbarn beach. The boardwalk is hugely popular and this further development is great news for Youghal and the community. It also offers an opportunity to raise awareness of the ecological significance of Ballyvergan Marsh and coastal zone, providing low impact on the environment, restricting erosion, and provision of an awareness platform of the area’s value to both locals and visitors alike.”

Cork County Council Divisional Manager for South, Valerie O’Sullivan added,

“This walkway will drive development of the area as a ‘destination’, complementing Cork County Council’s recent investments and developments in the town, including the upcoming Midleton to Youghal Greenway. It will ultimately drive footfall to Youghal town and surrounding area and become a driver for economic regeneration.”
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Mayor of County Cork first undertaking in her new role is the extension of the Youghal Boardwalk - And thats great news for the seaside town.

Newly elected Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr Mary Linehan Foley first undertaking in her new role was to sign the contract for the works, with a total value of €1.7M, with County Council’s Divisional Manager South, Valerie O’Sullivan and Director of Sorenson Civil Engineering Ltd., John Wallace. 

The picture shows the present 400-metre boardwalk at Claycastle running parallel to the Blue Flag 2020 beach and the fabulous panoramic vista of the famous 5-kilometer golden sandy beach and blue sea. Pictured inset: Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr Mary Linehan Foley signing the contract - this was her first undertaking as Mayor.

Full Story Here:
Youghal Eco-Boardwalk Extension Works Get Underway

Youghal is set for another boost to its tourism offering as works get underway on the extension of the current 400 metre boardwalk at Claycastle beach onto Redbarn. The contract for the works, with a total value of €1.7M, was the first undertaking of newly elected Mayor of the County of Cork Cllr Mary Linehan Foley, a native of Youghal, Cork with County Council’s Divisional Manager South, Valerie O’Sullivan and Director of Sorenson Civil Engineering Ltd., John Wallace.

Once complete the route will form part of the National Coastal Walking Route and will span 1.9 kilometres.  The Cork County Council project will significantly enhance the ‘beach experience’ for users, providing a formal pedestrian walkway from Redbarn beach into Youghal Town Centre, and is expected to be completed by October 2020.

This announcement comes following Cork County Council’s allocation of €500k for the extension under the Outdoor Recreation Infrastructure Scheme which is operated by the Department of Rural and Community Development.  Phase 1 of the project has already been successfully delivered by Cork County Council in partnership with Fáilte Ireland.  The current set of works will see the walkway run from Claycastle to Red Barn, adjacent to the dunes and reed beds of Ballyvergan Marsh.  Completion of the route will improve access, enhancing the natural heritage experience of walkers, providing a permanent hard walking surface of a two-metre wide boardwalk which successfully facilitates easy access for wheelchair users and pushchairs.  

Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr. Mary Linehan Foley, warmly welcomed the signing today, commenting,

“I am especially proud to sign this contact as County Mayor  for what is a fantastic amenity in Youghal. The extension will see the original 400 metre boardwalk at Claycastle beach, which was completed in 2012 extended by 1.5km as far as Redbarn beach. The boardwalk is hugely popular and this further development is great news for Youghal and the community. It also offers an opportunity to raise awareness of the ecological significance of Ballyvergan Marsh and coastal zone, providing low impact on the environment, restricting erosion, and provision of an awareness platform of the area’s value to both locals and visitors alike.”

Cork County Council Divisional Manager for South, Valerie O’Sullivan added,

“This walkway will drive development of the area as a ‘destination’, complementing Cork County Council’s recent investments and developments in the town, including the upcoming Midleton to Youghal Greenway.  It will ultimately drive footfall to Youghal town and surrounding area and become a driver for economic regeneration.”

Comment on Facebook

Congratulations Mary

2 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

Legends in Clashmore – Davy and Bridie Foley by Mike Hackett
Davy Foley was born in Geosh in the parish of Aglish on April 5th, 1923 and came to live in Clashmore in the early 1960’s after he married Bridie Ronayne from Monatrea.

During his working life, Davy gave a long service to Waterford County Council. He played football with the Geosh Emmetts team of old in the 1940’s and it is many the battle he would have had with the Clashmore and Ballycurrane teams of the time. Both Davy & Bridie had a lifelong devotion to Waterford GAA and one thing for sure is that you could guarantee you would meet them at any Waterford hurling game over the years.

Davy and Bridie were the driving force behind the formation of the Clashmore Tidy Towns Association back in 1966. One of the first large-scale projects which they were involved in was the building of the Our Lady of the Wayside Grotto at the foot of Clashmore Village in 1971 after an outstanding effort from the local community. Over the next few decades Davy led his committee to complete many other projects around the village such as rebuilding long-since ruined walls and a major long-term effort to clear and re-landscape the completely overgrown Old Graveyard at the top of the village.

Other major projects carried out in the late 80s/early 90s were the establishing of the two local walking trails, Kilmaloo Walk and St. Mochua’s Walk which took in St. Mochua’s Well and was also eventually extended to take in the old Raheen Quay.

In 1995 Davy & Bridie came up with their most ambitious plan yet when they decided to restore the old Church of Ireland building at the top of the village as a Heritage Centre which had stood without a roof for roughly 70 years when it had been removed to the church in Ardmore to avoid paying taxes on the building. A new entity called Clashmore Enterprise Group, chaired by Liam Curran, was set up to plan the project and to handle the extensive fundraising which would be required. Architect Pat Roycroft was enlisted to plan and oversee the restoration and the building contractor was Michael Foley, Monatrea. After many months of hard work and at a cost of approx. £200,000, the project was completed by 2001. Along with the fantastic support of Waterford Leader Partnership at the time, one of the other main fundraising efforts for this project was a very popular local song contest called “The Voice of Clashmore” which ran for several years afterwards and rotated around the five pubs in the parish at the time and will still hold some very fond memories for local patrons and contestants alike. The building is still run today by Clashmore Tidy Towns Association and is used by local groups such as Clashmore/Kinsalebeg Foróige, Clashmore/Kinsalebeg Heritage Group and the Community Council group, aswell as for various classes and events.

Down the years, Davy and Bridie were also heavily involved in other groups in Clashmore such as the Clashmore Comhaltas Branch and Clashmore Set-Dancers, both of which they had a great passion for, and it is many the Munster Scór Set-Dancing event that they travelled around to and indeed many the music sessions they were an integral part of over the years.

Davy & Bridie’s involvement in Tidy Towns continued up until roughly 2010 when both of them had to step back due to failing health, but only after an outstanding 50 years of dedication to the Tidy Towns cause and other groups, but above all else to the village of Clashmore itself. Sadly Bridie passed away in January 2019 and Davy is currently a resident of St. Joseph’s, Dungarvan and I think everyone will agree that the village of Clashmore has not been the same without them.

Bridie – – who was a good singer – – was great fun and would be laughing non-stop. I well remember when she worked at Cois Abhann Welfare Home at Mill Road in Youghal – – she was the life of the place – – cheering everybody up with her loud contagious laughter. As they say “She was a tonic”.
She had some funny sayings – – like when going into a room “You go first and I’ll go first after you”. Another one was – – as her feet would get sore from standing and walking – – “Time to change the boots”. And the most famous one was when an expectant father rang to ask what baby his wife had had. He thought that he was connected to a Maternity Hospital. “Oh” said Bridie “That would be some miracle because there’s nobody here under ninety years of age.
Clashmore – – like a lot of Irish villages – – lost state and semi-state businesses over the years. The Creamery was the first to go and this was a big loss to the shops and pubs. Horses and carts – – loaded with churns of milk would be lined up along the village street – – awaiting their turn to enter. Next it was the turn of the Garda Station to close – – and then the Post Office. It takes a great positive approach from a community to look to the future with confidence in view of all this. However you had long established families in the village – – whose roots went back decades – – if not hundreds of years – – and they weren’t ready to give up. Nobody was throwing in the towel – – this village was going to survive. Davy and Bridie Foley led the charge. Davy particularly got things moving to resurrect the place and the centre of excellence must go to the magnificent Heritage Centre. He was but one of a good group but he could give the example and supply the push that was needed. It reminds me of a chap that I worked with long ago and he had a famous saying “I’m only a cog in the wheel – – but I can make that wheel move”.
My grateful thanks to Liam Dunne for his extensive research, findings and presentation that went into the first part of this story today. Also for sourcing the photos – -old and new.
– Mike Hackett

Picture includes Clashmore Set Dancers, Davy Foley at the Grotto, Davy Nad Bridie and dog, Davy Foley in Heritage Camp Centre, Set Dancing Phylis O’Halloran, Davy Foley, Eamonn Meehan and Margaret Coffey; Bridie’s group at retirement; Bridie presented with a bouquet of flowers on her retirement.
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Legends in Clashmore - Davy and Bridie Foley by Mike Hackett
Davy Foley was born in Geosh in the parish of Aglish on April 5th, 1923 and came to live in Clashmore in the early 1960’s after he married Bridie Ronayne from Monatrea.

During his working life, Davy gave a long service to Waterford County Council. He played football with the Geosh Emmetts team of old in the 1940’s and it is many the battle he would have had with the Clashmore and Ballycurrane teams of the time. Both Davy & Bridie had a lifelong devotion to Waterford GAA and one thing for sure is that you could guarantee you would meet them at any Waterford hurling game over the years. 

Davy and Bridie were the driving force behind the formation of the Clashmore Tidy Towns Association back in 1966. One of the first large-scale projects which they were involved in was the building of the Our Lady of the Wayside Grotto at the foot of Clashmore Village in 1971 after an outstanding effort from the local community. Over the next few decades Davy led his committee to complete many other projects around the village such as rebuilding long-since ruined walls and a major long-term effort to clear and re-landscape the completely overgrown Old Graveyard at the top of the village.

Other major projects carried out in the late 80s/early 90s were the establishing of the two local walking trails, Kilmaloo Walk and St. Mochua’s Walk which took in St. Mochua’s Well and was also eventually extended to take in the old Raheen Quay.

In 1995 Davy & Bridie came up with their most ambitious plan yet when they decided to restore the old Church of Ireland building at the top of the village as a Heritage Centre which had stood without a roof for roughly 70 years when it had been removed to the church in Ardmore to avoid paying taxes on the building. A new entity called Clashmore Enterprise Group, chaired by Liam Curran, was set up to plan the project and to handle the extensive fundraising which would be required. Architect Pat Roycroft was enlisted to plan and oversee the restoration and the building contractor was Michael Foley, Monatrea. After many months of hard work and at a cost of approx. £200,000, the project was completed by 2001. Along with the fantastic support of Waterford Leader Partnership at the time, one of the other main fundraising efforts for this project was a very popular local song contest called “The Voice of Clashmore” which ran for several years afterwards and rotated around the five pubs in the parish at the time and will still hold some very fond memories for local patrons and contestants alike. The building is still run today by Clashmore Tidy Towns Association and is used by local groups such as Clashmore/Kinsalebeg Foróige, Clashmore/Kinsalebeg Heritage Group and the Community Council group, aswell as for various classes and events. 

Down the years, Davy and Bridie were also heavily involved in other groups in Clashmore such as the Clashmore Comhaltas Branch and Clashmore Set-Dancers, both of which they had a great passion for, and it is many the Munster Scór Set-Dancing event that they travelled around to and indeed many the music sessions they were an integral part of over the years.

Davy & Bridie’s involvement in Tidy Towns continued up until roughly 2010 when both of them had to step back due to failing health, but only after an outstanding 50 years of dedication to the Tidy Towns cause and other groups, but above all else to the village of Clashmore itself. Sadly Bridie passed away in January 2019 and Davy is currently a resident of St. Joseph’s, Dungarvan and I think everyone will agree that the village of Clashmore has not been the same without them. 

Bridie - - who was a good singer - - was great fun and would be laughing non-stop.  I well remember when she worked at Cois Abhann Welfare Home at Mill Road in Youghal - - she was the life of the place - - cheering everybody up with her loud contagious laughter.  As they say “She was a tonic”.  
She had some funny sayings - - like when going into a room “You go first and I’ll go first after you”.  Another one was - - as her feet would get sore from standing and walking - - “Time to change the boots”.  And the most famous one was when an expectant father rang to ask what baby his wife had had.  He thought that he was connected to a Maternity Hospital. “Oh” said Bridie “That would be some miracle because there’s nobody here under ninety years of age.  
 Clashmore - - like a lot of Irish villages - - lost state and semi-state businesses over the years.  The Creamery was the first to go and this was a big loss to the shops and pubs.  Horses and carts - - loaded with churns of milk would be lined up along the village street - - awaiting their turn to enter.  Next it was the turn of the Garda Station to close - - and then the Post Office.  It takes a great positive approach from a community to look to the future with confidence in view of all this.  However you had long established families in the village - - whose roots went back decades - - if not hundreds of years - - and they weren’t ready to give up.  Nobody was throwing in the towel - - this village was going to survive.  Davy and Bridie Foley led the charge.  Davy particularly got things moving to resurrect the place and the centre of excellence must go to the magnificent Heritage Centre.  He was but one of a good group but he could give the example and supply the push that was needed.  It reminds me of a chap that I worked with long ago and he had a famous saying “I’m only a cog in the wheel - - but I can make that wheel move”. 
My grateful thanks to Liam Dunne for his extensive research, findings and presentation that went into the first part of this story today.  Also for sourcing the photos  - -old and new.  
- Mike Hackett

Picture includes Clashmore Set Dancers, Davy Foley at the Grotto, Davy Nad Bridie and dog, Davy Foley in Heritage Camp Centre, Set Dancing Phylis OHalloran, Davy Foley, Eamonn Meehan and Margaret Coffey; Bridies group at retirement; Bridie presented with a bouquet of flowers on her retirement.Image attachmentImage attachment

Comment on Facebook

Noel Cunningham

What a lovely tribute to our Uncle Davie and Auntie Bridie(RIP) .What fantastic times we had with them with Scòr Comhaltas and set dancing. We travelled all over with them What wonderful memories.

A lovely tribute & well deserved – a great couple indeed !!

What a great couple great tribute

What a lovely tribute. They were the heart and soul of the village.

Omg the fun we had set dancing all down through the years And of course the music the fleadh's….. memories never to be forgotten

Amazing couple. We have so many memories of them since we were young.

Fantastic couple, Had a stall at the craft Fair many times. Got to know them at that time. 🤠

What a beautiful tribute.

Aww thats lovely 😍 i remember them both well xx

A beautiful tribute indeed ❤️❤️

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2 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

2nd July 2020
Council Resumes Construction of Housing in Youghal
Cork County Council in partnership with Tipson Ltd has recommenced works on the Sweetfields Social Housing Development on Chickleys Road, Youghal. The scheme is a mix of 2, 3 and 4 bed homes with 35 units in total. The first phase of the scheme consists of 12 houses and is due for completion at the end of August 2020, with the remainder being completed and delivered in phases before July 2021.

Mayor of the County of Cork Cllr. Mary Linehan Foley welcomed the scheme saying

“The recommencement of these works in my hometown of Youghal will make a huge difference both to people in need of housing and to the community of Youghal. Under Project ACT, Youghal’s residents play a vital role in supporting the reactivation of the local economy. With the recent Rural Regeneration & Development Fund announcement for the regeneration of Youghal Town Centre and works due to commence on the extension of Youghal Eco Boardwalk, I’m looking forward to seeing Youghal grow from strength to strength.”

Chief Executive Tim Lucey added

“As restrictions ease, Cork County Council will relentlessly pursue our targets of delivering excellent service for the communities of Cork. Chickleys Road is just one example of developments that will see Cork County continue to grow sustainably in line with our mission to support communities, local economies and to foster an excellent quality of life.”

Picture: Mayor of the County of Cork, Mary Linehan-Foley – Independent, East Cork, and pictures of the Cork County Council in partnership with Tipson Ltd works on the Sweetfields Social Housing Development on Chickleys Road, Youghal.
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Comment on Facebook

I lived in Chickleys Road when there was only two houses and Fitzgerald's farm, I would love to see this sometime.

Only 2 days in the job and she got tgings moving.fair play .

Ruth O Donoghue please god ye get 1 x

3 days ago

YoughalOnline.com

The Department of Culture, Heritage, and the Gaeltacht has approved total funding of €192,000 for the maintenance of historic and protected structures in Cork East under the Historic Structures Fund (HSF) and Built Heritage Investment Scheme (BHIS).

The Historic Structures Fund (HSF), which has two separate funding streams, was established to enable the conservation and enhancement of historic structures and buildings for the benefit of communities and the public. Stream 1 offers grants of between €15,000 and €50,000 for the repair of heritage structures while Stream 2 provides funding of €50,000 to €200,000 for larger heritage structure enhancement, refurbishment or reuse projects. Two projects in Cork East have been recommended for funding as part of this year’s HSF allocation:

* Myrtle Grove, Emmet Place, Youghal – installation of carefully routed electrical system through existing historic fabric and repair of several existing timber framed single glazed windows at second floor level – €20,000

* Saint George’s Arts and Heritage Centre, George Street, Mitchelstown – re-covering of the roof with natural slate to address widespread water ingress – €116,000 (funding amount to be split equally between 2020 and 2021).

Picture: The gates to Myrtle Grove at the Raleigh Quarter in Youghal where Sir Walter Raleigh once lived and picture inset Sir Walter Raleigh, Mayor of Youghal from 1588 to 1589.

Read the full story here:
www.thecork.ie/2020/06/11/youghal-mitchelstown-e192000-for-repair-of-historic-and-protected-struc…

stanton.ie/2020/06/11/funding-of-e192000-announced-for-the-repair-of-historic-and-protected-struc…
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The Department of Culture, Heritage, and the Gaeltacht has approved total funding of €192,000 for the maintenance of historic and protected structures in Cork East under the Historic Structures Fund (HSF) and Built Heritage Investment Scheme (BHIS).

The Historic Structures Fund (HSF), which has two separate funding streams, was established to enable the conservation and enhancement of historic structures and buildings for the benefit of communities and the public. Stream 1 offers grants of between €15,000 and €50,000 for the repair of heritage structures while Stream 2 provides funding of €50,000 to €200,000 for larger heritage structure enhancement, refurbishment or reuse projects. Two projects in Cork East have been recommended for funding as part of this year’s HSF allocation:

* Myrtle Grove, Emmet Place, Youghal – installation of carefully routed electrical system through existing historic fabric and repair of several existing timber framed single glazed windows at second floor level – €20,000

* Saint George’s Arts and Heritage Centre, George Street, Mitchelstown – re-covering of the roof with natural slate to address widespread water ingress – €116,000 (funding amount to be split equally between 2020 and 2021).

Picture: The gates to Myrtle Grove at the Raleigh Quarter in Youghal where Sir Walter Raleigh once lived and picture inset Sir Walter Raleigh, Mayor of Youghal from 1588 to 1589.

Read the full story here:
https://www.thecork.ie/2020/06/11/youghal-mitchelstown-e192000-for-repair-of-historic-and-protected-structures/?fbclid=IwAR0_BfPQYo3CLRWmHvVvjVnd-xNQMcP-XFPZH2Rnbs1AIZZzfZh8aUYaSec

http://stanton.ie/2020/06/11/funding-of-e192000-announced-for-the-repair-of-historic-and-protected-structures-in-cork-east-david-stanton/

Comment on Facebook

Is the government aware that this is solely used as a private residence and has not been open to the public for decades? It seems a bit odd that such a grant be given to a private house. I can think of many areas open to the public that 20k could be much more beneficial to. The owner has allowed the house to get into a dilapidated state and rejected any offers of help in the past, so why should public funding be spent on it? The only way we can appreciate the 20k is by standing on a mound in St. Mary's collegiate grounds and peering over the wall at it 🤷‍♀️

If the Department of culture , heritage & the Gaeltacht are exercising eminent domain by funding the necessary repair of a historical site, why should the residence then become a public amenity ? Sounds more like a grant!

💯 this should be given to the state. Disgraceful to let this go to ruin! Beautiful building and gardens! They should not be giving money to the family who obviously either don’t care or can’t afford the upkeep!! Hand the house over to the state to open up publicly

Correct me if I’m wrong , if a private house was receiving tax or other concessions it would have to be open to the public a couple of days a year ! Some houses get around this by advertising the the fact in some obscure publication at the other end of the country !

Seems strange for the state to fund upkeep of a property that isn't opened to the public at all

It would be great to see this opening to the public considering its public money been spent on it..

The grounds at least could be opened to the public for a few days a year considering that public money is being spent on this private residence.

Will they allow the public in as a thank you for giving them the grant

Great news 😊

Brilliant

I agree the present owners should be liable for the cost of works. It is a privately owned property with no public access.

Will Myrtle grove be open to public viewing ?

Is Myrtle Grove privately owned?

I don't think public money should go to a private property

It's not even certain that is the 'right' house.

Open it up or do not fund it

Serious gaff ya got there Stephen Curtin 😜😂

Aoife Murphy

Rachel Hamill!

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