Discovering Youghal: A Guide to Ireland's Hidden Gem

The seaside town of Youghal  Co. Cork, Ireland, offers visitors a perfect mix of ancient history, heritage and coastal charm. 

Visitors can enjoy miles of sandy beaches, stunning coastal views, and a range of modern amenities. Youghal is an ideal destination for your next vacation.

Youghal, Co. Cork, Ireland - YoughalOnline.com News

History & Heritage: Uncover the rich tapestry of Youghal’s history by exploring its many heritage sites and landmarks, including the impressive St. Mary’s Collegiate Church and the ruins of Youghal Friary, both dating back to the 13th century. Youghal’s legacy stretches far beyond its medieval architecture and encompasses important figures such as Oliver Cromwell, Sir Walter Raleigh, and Richard Boyle, all of whom have left their mark on this picturesque town. The iconic landmark Youghal Clock Gate Tower.

Outdoors: Embark on a journey of outdoor exploration and adventure, surrounded by rolling hills and scenic countryside. Hike and cycle through this breathtaking landscape and enjoy picnicking and birdwatching with the Cork cliffs as a stunning backdrop.

Beaches: Youghal’s long stretch of sandy beach is a destination in itself. Soak up the sun, swim in the waves, and participate in a range of water sports during the summer months. For a more relaxed experience, take in the peace and tranquility of the beach with a good book or a picnic in the sun.

Dining & Entertainment:  Youghal offers a varied selection of dining and entertainment options that cater to different preferences and budgets. From traditional Irish pubs to contemporary restaurants and cafes, there is something for everyone. Experience the town’s lively arts scene, with events and festivals such as the First Cut Film Festival, Moby Dick Festival, and Youghaloween Halloween Festival, throughout the year.

Accommodation: Our guide: Accommodation in Youghal helps you find the best options for your stay. From cozy bed and breakfasts to luxurious hotels, we have something for everyone. Start planning your perfect stay today in this charming seaside town.

Discover: Youghal, a concealed treasure located on the South East coast of Ireland, boasts a captivating combination of historical significance, breathtaking natural splendor, and contemporary conveniences. Regardless of whether your ideal vacation entails a peaceful beach getaway, an educational cultural excursion, or a thrilling outdoor pursuit, this charming town offers an experience unlike any other. Embark on a journey to Ireland and don’t miss the opportunity to uncover the magic of Youghal.

Youghal News




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Youghal's Maritime Movie Legacy: The Making of 'Moby Dick' in Youghal.

The late Paddy Linehan recalls the making of the film Moby Dick in Youghal back in the Summer of 1954 when "Hollywood came to town". In this fascinating never-seen-before clip he talks to Maurice Lynch who also recorded the interview on the old VHS video tape system.

Paddy Linehan's pivotal role in the production of the film "Moby Dick" in Youghal during 1954 is a testament to the town's enduring connection with this cinematic classic. His pub, initially known as Linehan's, played a multifaceted role in the filmmaking process. Beyond just serving as a base of operations for director John Huston and his film crew, Linehan's pub was also a significant on-screen location in the movie itself.

The exterior of the pub became an integral part of the film's backdrop, adding a layer of authenticity to the setting and immersing viewers in the maritime world of Herman Melville's epic novel. The decision to use Linehan's pub in the film was a nod to the town's rich maritime heritage, and it contributed to the unique charm of the movie.

In honor of its prominent role in the production, Linehan's pub was subsequently rebranded as "Moby Dick's," commemorating the film that forever left its mark on Youghal's history. This transformation not only recognized the pub's cinematic legacy but also solidified its place as a symbol of the enduring connection between Youghal and "Moby Dick."

The Linehan family, proud custodians of this iconic establishment, has preserved a remarkable collection of photographs capturing the cast and crew during the making of the film. These photographs offer visitors a glimpse into the behind-the-scenes magic of "Moby Dick" and provide a tangible link to the film's production history.

One of the most remarkable artifacts on display in Moby Dick's is Gregory Peck's prop whalebone leg, a generous gift from the legendary actor himself. This unique piece of memorabilia serves as a tangible reminder of the film's star-studded cast and their connection to Youghal.

Today, Paddy Linehan's pub, now known as Moby Dick's, has transformed into a beloved tourist attraction in Youghal. It stands as a living testament to the enduring legacy of the film, drawing enthusiasts, history buffs, and curious travelers alike. The establishment continues to be a cherished part of the town's cultural and historical fabric, with visitors coming from far and wide to experience the magic of "Moby Dick" in the very place where it was filmed.

Youghal's nineteenth-century lighthouse also played a cameo role in the film, appearing in a scene depicting the Pequod setting sail at sunset on its fateful voyage. This picturesque setting added to the film's visual grandeur and further embedded Youghal into the narrative of "Moby Dick."

The filming of "Moby Dick" in Youghal in 1954, with Paddy Linehan's pub at its heart, remains an indelible chapter in the town's history. It continues to be a source of pride and fascination for both locals and visitors, preserving the enduring allure of this cinematic masterpiece and the unique role Youghal played in its creation.

Filmed by Maurice Lynch on VHS
Thanks to Kevin Linehan of Moby Dicks Youghal
Re-edited by YoughalOnline.com
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4 CommentsComment on Facebook

Mary Linehan Foley great interview xxx

Shamie Moynihan

Unbelievable history fairplay

Our history right there and the late mr linehan a gentleman

Memories of Conna Castle music festivalsGroup of Conna people, including Community Council members, pictured at a Press Conference at Beamish & Crawford in Cork in August 1986 to promote Conna Castle Barbeque that year. Included at front are Donal Kenneally Promotions Manager Beamish & Crawford, John Finn Chairman Conna Community Council, Tom Higgins Chairman Organising Committee and Pat Hickey Treasurer Conna Community Council.
The entertainment that year at the Barbeque was: The Furey Brothers and Davy Arthur, The Barleycorn, Galleon. Donnacha O'Dulaing was the compere. Also dancing to Trish O'Brien and Saphire. Ian Richards Disco.
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Memories of Conna Castle music festivals

1 CommentComment on Facebook

Michael Mangan

2 days ago
YoughalOnline.com

Wed 27 Sep 2023: Cork County Council Continues Support for IRONMAN Ireland Cork Event in 2024.

Statement from Cork County Council on IRONMAN Ireland Cork

Chief Executive of Cork County Council Tim Lucey has advised the Elected Members of Cork County Council that the Council will continue to support the IRONMAN Ireland Cork event planned for 2024, having considered accounts presented by both IRONMAN and Triathlon Ireland on the IRONMAN Ireland Cork event held in Youghal last August.

Cork County Council, as Host Sponsor, has supported the IRONMAN Ireland Cork Triathlon Events in Youghal, East Cork in 2019, 2022 and 2023. The IRONMAN Ireland Cork event is of significant tourism and economic importance to the region, having already generated an economic impact of almost €20m, a continuation of which Cork County Council would wish to see.

As part of this arrangement, IRONMAN is the owner of the event. IRONMAN has sole responsibility for the management and coordination of the event. This responsibility includes running the event with due care, skill and attention.

The matter of the sanctioning of a permit by Triathlon Ireland, such that triathlon is run under federation technical rules, is a separate matter between IRONMAN and Triathlon Ireland. This is a matter which will be determined between both parties, independently of Cork County Council.

Photo shows the huge crowd of spectators and Ironman triathletes
on Windmill Hill, Youghal. (August 2022)
Picture-YoughalOnline.com
#ironman
#ironmanworldchampionship
#ironmanireland
#ironmanyoughal
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Wed 27 Sep 2023: Cork County Council Continues Support for IRONMAN Ireland Cork Event in 2024.

Statement from Cork County Council on IRONMAN Ireland Cork 
 
Chief Executive of Cork County Council Tim Lucey has advised the Elected Members of Cork County Council that the Council will continue to support the IRONMAN Ireland Cork event planned for 2024, having considered accounts presented by both IRONMAN and Triathlon Ireland on the IRONMAN Ireland Cork event held in Youghal last August. 
 
Cork County Council, as Host Sponsor, has supported the IRONMAN Ireland Cork Triathlon Events in Youghal, East Cork in 2019, 2022 and 2023. The IRONMAN Ireland Cork event is of significant tourism and economic importance to the region, having already generated an economic impact of almost €20m, a continuation of which Cork County Council would wish to see. 
 
As part of this arrangement, IRONMAN is the owner of the event. IRONMAN has sole responsibility for the management and coordination of the event.  This responsibility includes running the event with due care, skill and attention. 
 
The matter of the sanctioning of a permit by Triathlon Ireland, such that triathlon is run under federation technical rules, is a separate matter between IRONMAN and Triathlon Ireland. This is a matter which will be determined between both parties, independently of Cork County Council.

Photo shows the huge crowd of spectators and Ironman triathletes
on Windmill Hill, Youghal. (August 2022)
Picture-YoughalOnline.com
#ironman
#ironmanworldchampionship
#ironmanireland
#ironmanyoughal
2 days ago
YoughalOnline.com

Unraveling Youghal Lace: A Journey into History, Craftsmanship and Community. Brigid Keane talks to Michael Hussey about the historical and cultural importance of Youghal Lace.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGiRxa40eoY

Youghal Lace is a world-famous lace that was once sought after by popes, queens, and all who valued exquisite craftsmanship. The lace industry in Youghal owes its existence to the community of Presentation Nuns. The lace was known for its beauty and fine workmanship, making it a significant cultural and economic asset for the town.

Presentation Convent: The convent was home to the Presentation Sisters, a religious institute of Roman Catholic women founded in Cork, Ireland, by "Nano" Nagle. The Sisters' mission was to help the poor and needy around the world, and they played a crucial role in the development of Youghal Lace.

Preservation and Exhibition: It is essential for the town to not only recognize the significance of Youghal Lace and the Presentation Convent but also to preserve and exhibit this wonderful work done by the women and children involved.

The lace represents a unique cultural heritage and a testament to the skill and creativity of the people of Youghal. By preserving and exhibiting Youghal Lace, the town can attract tourists, promote local craftsmanship, and honor the legacy of the Presentation Sisters and their contributions to the community.

Visit: www.youghalonline.com/
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3 days ago
YoughalOnline.com

Ironman Youghal 2023 - Pedaling Through History:

Video shows the Ironman Cyclists' pass the landmark Youghal Lighthouse and Moll Goggins Corner.

The spectators line the Lighthouse Hill and beyond, cheering the cyclists as they head towards the east Cork byroads. The joy of the spectators watching the Ironman cyclist pass is palpable.
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3 days ago
YoughalOnline.com

Coastal erosion after storm Agnes at Youghal beach:

Coastal erosion, exacerbated by events like the powerful storm Agnes, poses a significant threat to our cherished Youghal beach and other coastal areas. The relentless retreat of our shorelines due to erosion not only diminishes the natural beauty of our sandy beaches but also casts a looming shadow over our vital tourism industry.

The allure of our coastal regions, characterised by pristine sandy beaches and breathtaking coastal landscapes, forms the backbone of our tourism sector. Visitors from near and far are drawn to these scenic destinations, seeking relaxation and recreation. However, the peril of coastal erosion, especially in the aftermath of a formidable storm like Agnes, jeopardises the very essence of what makes these locations so appealing.

To safeguard the long-term prosperity of our coastal economies, it is imperative that we adopt sustainable coastal management practices and prioritise the preservation of our coastal natural assets. These measures are not just crucial; they are paramount. By embracing sustainable strategies that include beach nourishment, dune restoration, and shoreline stabilisation, we can not only mitigate the immediate impact of erosion but also fortify the resilience of our coastal communities against future climatic challenges.

In doing so, we not only protect our beaches but also secure the livelihoods of those whose income depends on tourism. Furthermore, our commitment to sustainable coastal management not only enhances the beauty of our coastlines but also contributes to the overall well-being of our environment and ecosystems, ensuring that future generations can continue to enjoy the natural splendor that has been a hallmark of our coastal regions.

The photo shows the erosion at Youghal beach after the powerful storm surge caused by Storm Agnes. The storm hit Youghal, County Cork, on September 27, 2023.
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Coastal erosion after storm Agnes at Youghal beach:

Coastal erosion, exacerbated by events like the powerful storm Agnes, poses a significant threat to our cherished Youghal beach and other coastal areas. The relentless retreat of our shorelines due to erosion not only diminishes the natural beauty of our sandy beaches but also casts a looming shadow over our vital tourism industry.

The allure of our coastal regions, characterised by pristine sandy beaches and breathtaking coastal landscapes, forms the backbone of our tourism sector. Visitors from near and far are drawn to these scenic destinations, seeking relaxation and recreation. However, the peril of coastal erosion, especially in the aftermath of a formidable storm like Agnes, jeopardises the very essence of what makes these locations so appealing.

To safeguard the long-term prosperity of our coastal economies, it is imperative that we adopt sustainable coastal management practices and prioritise the preservation of our coastal natural assets. These measures are not just crucial; they are paramount. By embracing sustainable strategies that include beach nourishment, dune restoration, and shoreline stabilisation, we can not only mitigate the immediate impact of erosion but also fortify the resilience of our coastal communities against future climatic challenges.

In doing so, we not only protect our beaches but also secure the livelihoods of those whose income depends on tourism. Furthermore, our commitment to sustainable coastal management not only enhances the beauty of our coastlines but also contributes to the overall well-being of our environment and ecosystems, ensuring that future generations can continue to enjoy the natural splendor that has been a hallmark of our coastal regions.

The photo shows the erosion at Youghal beach after the powerful storm surge caused by Storm Agnes. The storm hit Youghal, County Cork, on September 27, 2023.

2 CommentsComment on Facebook

Replacing the Groynes would have certainly helped a lot by containing the sand on the beach . Victorian Groynes we’re replaced in A lot of similar type areas in the UK . Unfortunately for them since leaving EU they have to swim in sewage. To be fair our water quality is good thanks to the same EU

dont forget to mention the absolutely useless OPW that seem to go above and beyond at doing nothing or as little or ineffectively beneficial to the problem.

4 days ago
YoughalOnline.com

Saturday morning on Community Radio Youghal.

Cry Youghal will feature a short interview with Bishop William Crean about the Presentation Convent Nuns and how they played a significant role in various aspects of the community.

Listen into Noel Cronin's Rural Report show this Saturday, 30th September, 2023. Tune in between 10am and 12 noon.

Some of the contributions by The Presentation Sisters:

Education: The Presentation Sisters' primary focus was on creating and staffing schools to educate young people, especially young ladies. They were instrumental in providing educational opportunities for the local population, helping to improve literacy and knowledge in the area.

Youghal Lace: The community of Presentation Nuns in Youghal played a crucial role in the development of the town's lace industry. Youghal Lace was known for its exquisite craftsmanship and was once sought after by popes, queens, and all who valued fine workmanship. The nuns' involvement in the production of Youghal Lace helped to establish the town as a centre for this unique and highly prized craft.

Religious Life: The Presentation Convent in Youghal was a centre of religious life, providing a place for the nuns to live, worship, and carry out their mission of serving the poor and needy.

Community Support: The Presentation Sisters were known for their dedication to helping the poor and needy. In addition to their educational and lace-making activities, they provided support and assistance to those in need, contributing to the overall well-being of the Youghal community.

The contributions of the Presentation Convent Nuns in Youghal were not limited to the town itself. The Presentation Sisters were active in 24 countries as of 2021, including Antigua, Australia, Bolivia, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, Dominica, Ecuador, Guatemala, India, Ireland, Israel, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru, the Philippines, Slovakia, Thailand, the United Kingdom, the United States, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Their work continues to have a global impact, reflecting the enduring legacy of Nano Nagle and the Presentation Sisters.

The Presentation Sisters left Youghal on August 31, 2023, when the remaining sisters transferred to Midleton Convent. The Sisters have had a profound and positive influence on the educational, pastoral, and spiritual welfare of the parish since 1833.
To mark the departure of the community, a special Mass of Thanksgiving took place at the Holy Family Church on Friday, September 22, 2023, followed by a social occasion in the church hall.

We wish the Sisters well in this new phase of their lives.

Pictured are the Presentation Sisters with Bishop William Crean, Canon Bill Bermingham P.P. and Canon Tom Browne P.E. after the mass on Friday 22nd September, 2023.

Parish of Youghal
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Saturday morning on Community Radio Youghal.

Cry Youghal will feature a short interview with Bishop William Crean about the Presentation Convent Nuns and how they played a significant role in various aspects of the community.

Listen into Noel Cronins Rural Report show this Saturday, 30th September, 2023. Tune in between 10am and 12 noon.

Some of the contributions by The Presentation Sisters:

Education: The Presentation Sisters primary focus was on creating and staffing schools to educate young people, especially young ladies. They were instrumental in providing educational opportunities for the local population, helping to improve literacy and knowledge in the area.

Youghal Lace: The community of Presentation Nuns in Youghal played a crucial role in the development of the towns lace industry. Youghal Lace was known for its exquisite craftsmanship and was once sought after by popes, queens, and all who valued fine workmanship. The nuns involvement in the production of Youghal Lace helped to establish the town as a centre for this unique and highly prized craft.

Religious Life: The Presentation Convent in Youghal was a centre of religious life, providing a place for the nuns to live, worship, and carry out their mission of serving the poor and needy.

Community Support: The Presentation Sisters were known for their dedication to helping the poor and needy. In addition to their educational and lace-making activities, they provided support and assistance to those in need, contributing to the overall well-being of the Youghal community.

The contributions of the Presentation Convent Nuns in Youghal were not limited to the town itself. The Presentation Sisters were active in 24 countries as of 2021, including Antigua, Australia, Bolivia, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, Dominica, Ecuador, Guatemala, India, Ireland, Israel, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru, the Philippines, Slovakia, Thailand, the United Kingdom, the United States, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Their work continues to have a global impact, reflecting the enduring legacy of Nano Nagle and the Presentation Sisters.

The Presentation Sisters left Youghal on August 31, 2023, when the remaining sisters transferred to Midleton Convent. The Sisters have had a profound and positive influence on the educational, pastoral, and spiritual welfare of the parish since 1833.
To mark the departure of the community, a special Mass of Thanksgiving took place at the Holy Family Church on Friday, September 22, 2023, followed by a social occasion in the church hall.

We wish the Sisters well in this new phase of their lives.

Pictured are the Presentation Sisters with Bishop William Crean, Canon Bill Bermingham P.P. and Canon Tom Browne P.E. after the mass on Friday 22nd September, 2023.

Parish of Youghal
4 days ago
YoughalOnline.com

Community Radio Youghal will feature a short interview about the historical and cultural importance of Youghal Lace on Noel Cronin's Rural Report show this Saturday, 30th September, 2023. Tune in between 10am and 12 noon. Brigid Keane talks to Michael Hussey in this fascinating segment.

Youghal Lace is a world-famous lace that was once sought after by popes, queens, and all who valued exquisite craftsmanship. The lace industry in Youghal owes its existence to the community of Presentation Nuns. The lace was known for its beauty and fine workmanship, making it a significant cultural and economic asset for the town.

Presentation Convent: The convent was home to the Presentation Sisters, a religious institute of Roman Catholic women founded in Cork, Ireland, by "Nano" Nagle. The Sisters' mission was to help the poor and needy around the world, and they played a crucial role in the development of Youghal Lace.

Preservation and Exhibition: It is essential for the town to not only recognize the significance of Youghal Lace and the Presentation Convent but also to preserve and exhibit this wonderful work done by the women and children involved. The lace represents a unique cultural heritage and a testament to the skill and creativity of the people of Youghal. By preserving and exhibiting Youghal Lace, the town can attract tourists, promote local craftsmanship, and honor the legacy of the Presentation Sisters and their contributions to the community.
You can listen to the broadcast at this link: www.cry104fm.com/

Picture: One of the Lace Rooms in the Presentation Convent, Youghal, County Cork.
Cry Youghal
#youghallace
#irishlace
#irishtextiles
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Community Radio Youghal will feature a short interview about the historical and cultural importance of Youghal Lace on Noel Cronins Rural Report show this Saturday, 30th September, 2023. Tune in between 10am and 12 noon. Brigid Keane talks to Michael Hussey in this fascinating segment.

Youghal Lace is a world-famous lace that was once sought after by popes, queens, and all who valued exquisite craftsmanship. The lace industry in Youghal owes its existence to the community of Presentation Nuns. The lace was known for its beauty and fine workmanship, making it a significant cultural and economic asset for the town.

Presentation Convent: The convent was home to the Presentation Sisters, a religious institute of Roman Catholic women founded in Cork, Ireland, by Nano Nagle. The Sisters mission was to help the poor and needy around the world, and they played a crucial role in the development of Youghal Lace.

Preservation and Exhibition: It is essential for the town to not only recognize the significance of Youghal Lace and the Presentation Convent but also to preserve and exhibit this wonderful work done by the women and children involved. The lace represents a unique cultural heritage and a testament to the skill and creativity of the people of Youghal. By preserving and exhibiting Youghal Lace, the town can attract tourists, promote local craftsmanship, and honor the legacy of the Presentation Sisters and their contributions to the community.
You can listen to the broadcast at this link: https://www.cry104fm.com/

Picture: One of the Lace Rooms in the Presentation Convent, Youghal, County Cork.
Cry Youghal
#youghallace
#irishlace
#irishtextiles
5 days ago
YoughalOnline.com

"Youghal Little Theatre: Behind the Footlights and Friendship"

Ita Kirk Beecher, Denise FitzGerald and Michael Beecher talk about the Youghal Little Theatre Society. (Recorded 2014)

ITA KIRK - BEECHER: We met in different places; there were preparing for the first play, Shadow and Substance. It was quite a big group that times, including Tomás Begley, Kitty Cole from Ballymacoda and Eileen Walsh also Ballymacoda, my sister Nellie, Ned and his brother Jim Harris, Kitty McCarthy of Tallow Street, Joan Devine, Kathleen Heffernan (Twomey) and myself. There were others -worked in the bank, whose names I can't remember.

One time Killarney had a drama festival and we hired a bus and went there; the adjudicator was Micheál Mac Liammóir from the Abbey Theatre in Dublin. But in the past, Eddie Colbert and him had some differences in Dublin, so our play came last. We struck the wrong place to go for a festival!

Every summer we would go off on a picnic of the Blackwater; let our hair down at that - with a big bag of crubeens for the boys.... And sandwiches for the ladies. The boys went to the pub in Villierstown. But there was no pub for the ladies at that time. We hired the ferry boat; one day when we went up the men were all active and they told us to stay where you are. We are stuck in the sand bank. We started laughing but they told us it was very dangerous. We had to get the oars out and do some pushing and shopping to get off the sandbank.

Eddie Colbert was an insurance agent in Youghal and his sister Kitty was a great actress and she cycled in from Ballymacoda for rehearsals. Eileen Walsh was an attendant at St. Raphael's. Usually people who were working in the bank would join us - there weren't actually coming in from any place, but were staying in Youghal.

All the photographs were taken when we went on the picnics; we never had any social side otherwise. My name was Ita Kirk and then Ned Harris, Kieran Nolan, Seán Rogers who was a clerk, in Joe Brodericks drapers; Con Hurley, Claire O'Brien, Jim Harris and Mrs Albert Cole, Michael Murray and some more I can't place. Kathleen Heffernan is in there and Eileen Walsh, who had a shop out the Strand. Betty Doyle from De Valera Street who was the Canon's housekeeper in Shadow and Substance and worked in the bank. My sister Nelly and Teresa Guiry, myself, Ned Harris, Ned O'Brien Clair's husband, Con Keogh, Roger??? Charlie Flavin, a great actor, Joe Hallissey, Tom Begley and Eddie Colbert at the back and Kitty Colbert. We were always very happy together. That's the original lot - others came and went over the years. It's nice that it's going to be revived after all these years.

I hope they will have a play for the Golden Jubilee, in which they hope to produce Shadow and Substance.

DENISE FITZGERALD: I think I became a member around 1968. At the time you kind of had to be asked if you'd like to join. I was asked but I wouldn't be as good as Ita at remembering. I think it was for Juno and the Paycock. At the time the plays were held in the town hall. But I also remember going out to The Bush in The Quarry Road. Nuala Casey's place. A woman married to a guy called Maurice and we used to do rehearsals there. I was very young and I remember it was the first time I saw people drinking wine. It was all very modern and sociable and lovely.

The main characters I remember in the little theatre were Albert Cole, Con Hurley and Tommy Curtin as a very young lad and playing that type of part in one of the productions.

I remember playing a part in a play that Con Hurley was in and I had to come on stage with eggs in a brown paper bag. I was very angry with him in this part and he was sitting with his back to me and I was to catch the bag and bate him on top of the head. The idea was that the eggs would break and all the goo would come down over his face. It worked most nights. On this particular night, I think there were three eggs in the bag and I built him on the head but nothing happened. So I belted him again; still nothing happened. So I belted him a third time and maybe a fourth. And they broke the fourth time. Con had a bump on his head from all the building and Canon Sheehan in the front row cut a blob of yolk across the face. The whole place stopped, including the play as he stood up trying to wipe himself. The people on stage lost their lines and the audience started laughing. Con Hurley told me never again to hit him four times on the head! He was sore after the banging on his head and he was angry.

We had great fun. We had our parties in the Devonshire Arms on the closing night - I think they usually ran for three nights. They were great audiences. Albert Cole was very strict and everything had to be done right. You would redo everything until you got it right. He was a perfectionist. Con was great fun too. They were great times.

MICHAEL BEECHER: Michael recalls his fondness for live shows and praises the director, Seán O'Neill. He notes that the theater group had periods of inactivity but is now putting on shows again. Michael recalls Albert Cole's performance in "Dracula" and describes him as being on par with Hollywood actors.
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5 CommentsComment on Facebook

Great times and good friends. I remember going out to The Barn for rehearsals and it was almost country at that time with very few houses along the way. The Town Hall was filled to capacity on each of the nights and I remember very well Con giving out mad to me for hitting him so hard on the head. But I had to, cos the eggs HAD TO BREAK or else there was no yoke running down his face !!! Good days definitely. Great memories 🤗

Wow thanks so much for this recollection and photos .

Thomas Casey X

Cathy Collins

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