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22 hours ago
YoughalOnline.com

ONLY 30 TICKETS LEFT!

There are just 30 tickets shared between Cree's Card Shop and Read & Write left for this years concert Youghal Pipe Band in Concert 2023.

Get yours soon to avoid disappointment because once they're gone, they're gone...

Visit: www.youghalpipeband.com
... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago
YoughalOnline.com

A Step Back In Time. FILM | Free Screening | Monday 27th March | 45 mins | Compiled and edited by Michael Hussey

Bobby Chapple home movie archive film screening at Cumann na Daoine as part of the Lifelong Learning Festival.

A free screening of the home movie archive of the late Bobby Chapple is taking place on Monday, 27th, March, at 3:30pm in the Cumann na Daoine premises on Catherine street, Youghal.

Amateur filmmaker Bobby Chapple captured the hustle and bustle of everyday life outside his front door shop on North main street Youghal from the 1950’s to the 1970’s. This wonderful collection of archive 8mm film will be screened for the first time at Cumann na Daoine.

There are many and varied scenes shown in the silent home movie clips: The busy dockside with the boats entering and leaving the harbour. The building of the new Lighthouse hill as we know it. The Lifeboat launched at The Mall. The marching bands like St. Mary’s Brass and Reed Band and the Cork Hill Pipe Band. The opening of the New Bridge in 1963. A workers strike outside the Youghal Post Office. The trains arriving at the Youghal Railway Station. Shark fishing and weigh-in (not for the squeamish!) Jazz Healy’s gymnastics team performing at Green Park. The huge fire at the Atlantic and the Pacific hotels at the Upper strand in 1972. Factory workers, bonfire night, the collapse of Cal Flavins’s shop at the corner of main street and Nile street. Armistice remembrance day outside the British Legion building in the 1950s. St. Mary’s Collegiate Church is also featured. This is where Bobby spent much of his time documenting the historic church and Bobby himself talks of the folklore legend of Oliver Cromwell’s daughter buried beneath the tiles in the church. The building of the landmark water tower at the top of Cork Hill is surrounded by metal scaffolding. The tourist ‘Glass Boat’ as it was known locally doing the river trips and not least to mention the well known cartoon outside his shop that Bobby himself painted.

All in all a packed archive of nostalgia.

Local Community Development Worker with Cumann na Daoine, Hayley Fox-Roberts, said “We are delighted to be screening this wonderful home movie archive as part of the Lifelong Long Learning Festival. We have screened similar events like this before and it’s so good to see previous audiences participation when they see faces and places from the past. The names keep on rolling out throughout the screening. This one though is specially dedicated to the late amateur filmmaker Bobby Chapple and I’m very much looking forward to it”

Michael Hussey who edited and compiled the archive said “It will be a bit like Marty McFly going Back to the Future in the Cumann na Daoine premises time machine. So set your present time for Month: March: Day 27: Year 2023: Hour: 15:00: Minute: 30 and your destination time for Youghal 1950s to the 70s."

So step back in time for a bit of fun and chat and teas and biscuits. Please come along to the free launch this Monday, the 27th March, 2023 and delve into the town's past.

WHERE: Cumann na Daoine
WHEN: Monday 27th March
TIME: 3:30pm

Info:
Hayley Fox-Roberts
Local Community Development Worker
Cumann na Daoine,
Catherine Street,
Youghal, Co. Cork
024 91900
... See MoreSee Less

A Step Back In Time. FILM | Free Screening | Monday 27th March | 45 mins | Compiled and edited by Michael Hussey

Bobby Chapple home movie archive film screening at Cumann na Daoine as part of the Lifelong Learning Festival.

A free screening of the home movie archive of the late Bobby Chapple is taking place on Monday, 27th, March, at 3:30pm in the Cumann na Daoine premises on Catherine street, Youghal.

Amateur filmmaker Bobby Chapple captured the hustle and bustle of everyday life outside his front door shop on North main street Youghal from the 1950’s to the 1970’s. This wonderful collection of archive 8mm film will be screened for the first time at Cumann na Daoine.

There are many and varied scenes shown in the silent home movie clips: The busy dockside with the boats entering and leaving the harbour. The building of the new Lighthouse hill as we know it. The Lifeboat launched at The Mall. The marching bands like St. Mary’s Brass and Reed Band and the Cork Hill Pipe Band. The opening of the New Bridge in 1963. A workers strike outside the Youghal Post Office. The trains arriving at the Youghal Railway Station. Shark fishing and weigh-in (not for the squeamish!) Jazz Healy’s gymnastics team performing at Green Park. The huge fire at the Atlantic and the Pacific hotels at the Upper strand in 1972. Factory workers, bonfire night, the collapse of Cal Flavins’s shop at the corner of main street and Nile street. Armistice remembrance day outside the British Legion building in the 1950s. St. Mary’s Collegiate Church is also featured. This is where Bobby spent much of his time documenting the historic church and Bobby himself talks of the folklore legend of Oliver Cromwell’s daughter buried beneath the tiles in the church. The building of the landmark water tower at the top of Cork Hill is surrounded by metal scaffolding. The tourist ‘Glass Boat’ as it was known locally doing the river trips and not least to mention the well known cartoon outside his shop that Bobby himself painted.

All in all a packed archive of nostalgia.

Local Community Development Worker with Cumann na Daoine, Hayley Fox-Roberts, said “We are delighted to be screening this wonderful home movie archive as part of the Lifelong Long Learning Festival. We have screened similar events like this before and it’s so good to see previous audiences participation when they see faces and places from the past. The names keep on rolling out throughout the screening. This one though is specially dedicated to the late amateur filmmaker Bobby Chapple and I’m very much looking forward to it”

Michael Hussey who edited and compiled the archive said “It will be a bit like Marty McFly going Back to the Future in the Cumann na Daoine premises time machine. So set your present time for Month: March: Day 27: Year 2023: Hour: 15:00: Minute: 30 and your destination time for Youghal 1950s to the 70s.

So step back in time for a bit of fun and chat and teas and biscuits. Please come along to the free launch this Monday, the 27th March, 2023 and delve into the towns past.

WHERE: Cumann na Daoine
WHEN: Monday 27th March
TIME: 3:30pm

Info:
Hayley Fox-Roberts
Local Community Development Worker
Cumann na Daoine,
Catherine Street,
Youghal, Co. Cork
024 91900

Comment on Facebook

This looks fantastic, wish I could see it

Will there be an evening or weekend screening?

Will there be a second screening in April ?

Selina Hickey

1 week ago
YoughalOnline.com

Great Characters who have left us – but are not forgotten. By Mike Hackett

John Young - Author, Maritime Historian and Tour Guide.
John was ever willing to give a talk when asked. He lived in Dungarvan - but his knowledge of maritime affairs covered all of the South of Ireland coast and the traffic on its rivers. One of

John's favourite poems was this one:

'Sea Fever' by John Macefield.
I must go down to the sea again - to the lonely sea and the sky
And all I ask is a tall ship - and a star to steer her by.
A wet sheet and a flowing sea - a wind that follows fast
And fills the white and rustling sails - and bends the gallant mast.

Tom Fitzgerald of Red Forge - was another good entertainer, generous with his time. This poem ‘Miceal Bocht’ – by an unknown author – Tom could perform well.

On a little farm near Ceathru Rua, lived a buchaill maith named Miceal Mor,
Heard this story o mo athair, if you haven’t Gaeilge, it doesn’t matter,
This rural Ireland tragic tale, narrates a sad seductive sceal,
Concerning lust without discretion, agus beagnach rudai eile freisin,

Uair amhain fado fado, On a little farm near Carraroe,
Lived buachaill maith named Miceal Mor, an only son of thirty-four,
When work was done at end of day, He’d settle down with cupan tae,

And seldom felt the call to stroll, or spend the evening time ag ol,
His intellectual needs were drawn, from books like Peg or Iosagan,
And so it was bliain in agus bliain out, our Miceal hadn’t moved about,
Hr dreamt of cailins, most men do, but never sinned, an dtuigeann tu,

Meantime up in Atha Cliath, a cailin deas had a bright idea,
When laethanta saoire time came by, decided she would like to try,
Ait beag ciuin like Carraroe, no foreign food and not far to go,
There to meet the native clan, agus bfheidir find herself a man,
This cailin deas with eyes of blue, was known in town as City Sue,
The lusty buachailli, they came calling, and all agreed she was go halainn,

She left her men in a state of shock, O Miceal Mor, be curamach,
This scarlet woman knows each trick, she’s heading west, beware a mhic,

The lights shone in the parish hall, for the local Fainne Wearer’s Ball,
Bhi Miceal ann agus bhi Suzy ann, dressed in the most revealing gown,
Our brave Cuchulainn of the west, his hurling medals across his chest,
Exclaimed when City Sue came in, “In ainm De, feach ar sin!”
Though nervous still, he took a chance, “Cead Mile Failte, will you dance?”
Go luath on the floor they strut, cheek to cheek from head to foot,
Sue whispered into Miceal’s ear “Eist liom - let’s disappear”,
“We’ll use my place, the door’s unlocked, stay the night at Seomra a hocht”
Miceal’s ceann was in a spin, ni raibh se thinking thoughts mar sin,
He blessed himself, this Jezebel, would surely damn his soul to hell,
He stood aghast, could hardly stutter, so off he bolted, ar a rothar,
And straight abhaile into bed, decades of the rosary he said,

Miceal Mor still sleeps alone, in his leaba beag, Ochon, Ochon,
He often dreams of seomra a hocht, what might have been, oh Miceal Bocht!

John Kennedy of Ardmore and the ‘Gossip Shop’ loved to recite and entertain. Patrick Kavanagh, who wrote ‘Raglan Road’, was one of his favourite poets.

On Raglan Road on an Autumn day, I saw her first and knew,
That her dark hair would weave a snare that I might someday rue,
I saw the danger and I passed, along the enchanted way,
And I said “Let grief be a fallen leaf, at the dawning of the day”.

On Grafton St. in November, we tripped lightly along the edge,
Of a deep revine that can be seen, the worth of passion play,
The Queen of Hearts still making tarts, and I not making hay,
Oh I loved too much, and by such and such, is happiness thrown away.
I said let grief be a fallen leaf, at the dawning of the day.

Charlie Flavin from Inch near Killeagh was a great friend of John Kenneddy and a frequent visitor to John’s Gossip Shop. Again he was always very willing to perform and display his talents whenever asked. This poem by John Keegan was one that he loved to recite; ‘Pinch and Caoch O’Laoghaire’.
One Winter’s day, long long ago, When I was a little fellow,
A piper wandered to our door, grey-haired, blind and yellow,
And how glad was my young heart, though earth and sky looked dreary,
To see the stranger and his dog, poor Pinch and Caoch O’Laoghaire,
And when he stowed away his bag, crossed-barred with green and yellow,
I thought and said “In Ireland’s ground, there is not a finer fellow”,
And Fineen Burke and Shaun McGee and Eily, Kate and Mary,
Rushed in with panting haste to see, and welcome Coach O’Laoghaire,
O God be with those happy times, O God be with my childhood,
When I, bare-headed, roamed all day, bird nesting in the wildwood,
I’ll not forget those sunny hours, however years may vary,
I’ll not forget my early friends, nor honest Caoch O’Laoghaire,

Well twenty summers had gone past, and June’s red sun was sinking,
When I, as a man, sat by my door, of twenty sad things thinking,
A little dog came up the way, his gait was slow and weary,
And at his tail, a lame man limped, ‘twas Pinch and Caoch O’Laoghaire,
Old Caoch, but so woe-be-gone, his form bowed and bending,
His fleshless hands are stiff and worn, Ay, time is even blending,
The colours on his threadbare bag, and Pinch is twice as hairy,
And thin-spare as when first I saw himself and Caoch O’Laoghaire,

With Pinch I watched his bed that night, next day his wish was granted,
He died and Father James was brought and the Requiem Mass was chanted,
The neighbours came to dig his grave, near Eily, Kate and Mary,
And there he sleeps, his last long sleep – God rest you Caoch O’Laoghaire.

Jim Carrig of Knockanore is remembered as an actor and entertainer who was always good for a laugh. Jim loved to recite this poem (while wearing a white shirt). It was written by Harry Wincott and called ‘The Little Shirt me Mother made for Me’.
I shant forget the day that I was born,
‘Twas on a cold and frosty winter’s morn,
The doctor said I was a chubby chap
And when the nurse took me on her lap
She washed me all over, I remember
And after powder-puffing me you see
She laid me in the cradle near the fender
In the little shirt me mother made for me.

The first day that I wore me knicker-bocks,
I did feel funny after wearing frocks,
I looked a little picture, they all say
But when they sent me out to run and play
I didn’t like the breeches I was wearing
So in the street I took them off you see
And I started walking home, brave and daring
In the little shirt me mother made for me.

Last year when I was on me holidays,
Upon the briny ocean I would gaze,
The water looked so nice that I thought I’d go
And have a swim but in a minute how
All the girls at me were staring
And some were taking snap-shots, I could see
‘Twas a good job for me that I was wearing
The little shirt me mother made for me.

Photos:
1 – John Young prepares to give a talk at a book launch
2 – Tom Fitzgerald entertained in England before retiring back home
3 - Tom relaxed after a show with his pint
4– John Kennedy is in full voice at the launch of a book for Siobhan Lincoln of Ardmore. Also in picture is Julian Walton
5 – Charlie Flavin of Inch - a son-in-law of Dan O’Callaghan, famous poet
6 – Jim Carrig – being made up for a play
7 - Bill Canning with Jim Carrig in the film 'The Promised Land'
... See MoreSee Less

Great Characters who have left us – but are not forgotten. By Mike Hackett

John Young - Author, Maritime Historian and Tour Guide.
John was ever willing to give a talk when asked.  He lived in Dungarvan - but his knowledge of maritime affairs covered all of the South of Ireland coast and the traffic on its rivers.  One of 

Johns favourite poems was this one: 

Sea Fever by John Macefield.
I must go down to the sea again - to the lonely sea and the sky
And all I ask is a tall ship - and a star to steer her by.
A wet sheet and a flowing sea - a wind that follows fast
And fills the white and rustling sails - and bends the gallant mast. 

Tom Fitzgerald  of Red Forge  - was another good entertainer, generous with his time.  This poem  ‘Miceal Bocht’ – by an unknown author – Tom could perform well.   

On a little farm near Ceathru Rua, lived a buchaill maith named Miceal Mor,
Heard this story o mo athair, if you haven’t Gaeilge, it doesn’t matter,
This rural Ireland tragic tale, narrates a sad seductive sceal,
Concerning lust without discretion, agus beagnach rudai eile freisin, 

Uair amhain fado fado, On a little farm near Carraroe, 
Lived buachaill maith named Miceal Mor, an only son of thirty-four,
When work was done at end of day, He’d settle down with cupan tae,  

And seldom felt the call to stroll, or spend the evening time ag ol, 
His intellectual needs were drawn, from books like Peg or Iosagan, 
And so it was bliain in agus bliain out, our Miceal hadn’t moved about, 
Hr dreamt of cailins, most men do, but never sinned, an dtuigeann tu, 

Meantime up in Atha Cliath, a cailin deas had a bright idea, 
When laethanta saoire time came by, decided she would like to try,
Ait beag ciuin like Carraroe, no foreign food and not far to go, 
There to meet the native clan, agus bfheidir find herself a man,
This cailin deas with eyes of blue, was known in town as City Sue, 
The lusty buachailli, they came calling, and all agreed she was go halainn, 

She left her men in a state of shock, O Miceal Mor, be curamach, 
This scarlet woman knows each trick, she’s heading west, beware a mhic, 

The lights shone in the parish hall, for the local Fainne Wearer’s Ball, 
Bhi Miceal ann agus bhi Suzy ann, dressed in the most revealing gown,
Our brave Cuchulainn of the west, his hurling medals across his chest, 
Exclaimed when City Sue came in, “In ainm De, feach ar sin!” 
Though nervous still, he took a chance, “Cead Mile Failte, will you dance?” 
Go luath on the floor they strut, cheek to cheek from head to foot, 
 Sue whispered into Miceal’s ear “Eist liom - let’s disappear”,  
“We’ll use my place, the door’s unlocked, stay the night at Seomra a hocht” 
Miceal’s ceann was in a spin, ni raibh se thinking thoughts mar sin, 
He blessed himself, this Jezebel, would surely damn his soul to hell, 
He stood aghast, could hardly stutter, so off he bolted, ar a rothar, 
And straight abhaile into bed, decades of the rosary he said, 

Miceal Mor still sleeps alone, in his leaba beag, Ochon, Ochon, 
He often dreams of seomra a hocht, what might have been, oh Miceal Bocht! 

John Kennedy of Ardmore and the ‘Gossip Shop’ loved to recite and entertain.   Patrick Kavanagh, who wrote ‘Raglan Road’, was one of his favourite poets. 

On Raglan Road on an Autumn day, I saw her first and knew, 
That her dark hair would weave a snare that I might someday rue, 
I saw the danger and I passed, along the enchanted way,
And I said “Let grief be a fallen leaf, at the dawning of the day”.

On Grafton St. in November, we tripped lightly along the edge,
Of a deep revine that can be seen, the worth of passion play, 
The Queen of Hearts still making tarts, and I not making hay,
Oh I loved too much, and by such and such, is happiness thrown away. 
I said let grief be a fallen leaf, at the dawning of the day. 

Charlie Flavin from Inch near Killeagh was a great friend of John Kenneddy and a frequent visitor to John’s Gossip Shop.  Again he was always very willing to perform and display his talents whenever asked.  This poem by John Keegan was one that he loved to recite;  ‘Pinch and Caoch O’Laoghaire’. 
One Winter’s day, long long ago, When I was a little fellow,
A piper wandered to our door, grey-haired, blind and yellow,
And how glad was my young heart, though earth and sky looked dreary, 
To see the stranger and his dog, poor Pinch and Caoch O’Laoghaire, 
And when he stowed away his bag, crossed-barred with green and yellow,
I thought and said “In Ireland’s ground, there is not a finer fellow”, 
And Fineen Burke and Shaun McGee and Eily, Kate and Mary,
Rushed in with panting haste to see, and welcome Coach O’Laoghaire, 
O God be with those happy times, O God be with my childhood, 
When I, bare-headed, roamed all day, bird nesting in the wildwood,
I’ll not forget those sunny hours, however years may vary,
I’ll not forget my early friends, nor honest Caoch O’Laoghaire, 

Well twenty summers had gone past, and June’s red sun was sinking,
When I, as a man, sat by my door, of twenty sad things thinking, 
A little dog came up the way, his gait was slow and weary, 
And at his tail, a lame man limped, ‘twas Pinch and Caoch O’Laoghaire, 
 Old Caoch, but so woe-be-gone, his form bowed and bending, 
His fleshless hands are stiff and worn, Ay, time is even blending, 
The colours on his threadbare bag, and Pinch is twice as hairy, 
And thin-spare as when first I saw himself and Caoch O’Laoghaire,

With Pinch I watched his bed that night, next day his wish was granted,
He died and Father James was brought and the Requiem Mass was chanted,
The neighbours came to dig his grave, near Eily, Kate and Mary,
And there he sleeps, his last long sleep – God rest you Caoch O’Laoghaire. 

Jim Carrig of Knockanore is remembered as an actor and entertainer who was always good for a laugh.  Jim loved to recite this poem (while wearing a white shirt).  It was written by Harry Wincott and called ‘The Little Shirt me Mother made for Me’.  
I shant forget the day that I was born,
‘Twas on a cold and frosty winter’s morn,
The doctor said I was a chubby chap
And when the nurse took me on her lap
She washed me all over, I remember
And after powder-puffing me you see
She laid me in the cradle near the fender
In the little shirt me mother made for me.

The first day that I wore me knicker-bocks,
I did feel funny after wearing frocks,
I looked a little picture, they all say
But when they sent me out to run and play
I didn’t like the breeches I was wearing
So in the street I took them off you see
And I started walking home, brave and daring
In the little shirt me mother made for me. 

Last year when I was on me holidays,
Upon the briny ocean I would gaze,
The water looked so nice that I thought I’d go 
And have a swim but in a minute how
All the girls at me were staring
And some were taking snap-shots, I could see
‘Twas a good job for me that I was wearing
The little shirt me mother made for me.  

Photos:
1 – John Young prepares to give a talk at a book launch
2 – Tom Fitzgerald entertained in England before retiring back home 
3 - Tom relaxed after a show with his pint 
4– John Kennedy is in full voice at the launch of a book for Siobhan Lincoln of Ardmore.  Also in picture is Julian Walton 
5 – Charlie Flavin of Inch  - a son-in-law of Dan O’Callaghan, famous poet
6 – Jim Carrig – being made up for a play 
7 - Bill Canning with Jim Carrig in the film The Promised LandImage attachmentImage attachment+4Image attachment

Comment on Facebook

Thank you for sharing this Michael, a beautiful piece of history.

A lovely read Michael thanks for the memories

Phyllis Lane show this to Dad.... Especially the part about Charlie Flavin, it's lovely 💞

Thank You Michael…

Brilliant!

View more comments

2 weeks ago
YoughalOnline.com

Mother's day window display at Kay's flowers at Clarke's on North main street, Youghal.

The framed photographs are from people who handed in treasured photos of their mothers to be part of the wonderful decoration for Mother's Day this Sunday.
... See MoreSee Less

Mothers day window display at Kays flowers at Clarkes on North main street, Youghal.

The framed photographs are from people who handed in treasured photos of their mothers to be part of the wonderful decoration for Mothers Day this Sunday.

Comment on Facebook

Beautiful tribute to mums ❤️

Beautiful tribute to all the wonderful mum's ❤️

Thank you for letting me honour my beloved Mom 🥰☘️

Well done kay for thinking of this x

Fantastic idea. 👏

Was the perfect idea

View more comments

2 weeks ago
YoughalOnline.com

(circa 1965) Youghal Clock Gate Tower - A pedestrian walks past cars parked on Main Street in front of Youghal Clock Gate Tower in the seaside town of Youghal in County Cork on the southeast coast of Ireland circa 1965. Photo by Paul Popper - www.youghalonline.com/ ... See MoreSee Less

(circa 1965) Youghal Clock Gate Tower - A pedestrian walks past cars parked on Main Street in front of Youghal Clock Gate Tower in the seaside town of Youghal in County Cork on the southeast coast of Ireland circa 1965. Photo by Paul Popper - https://www.youghalonline.com/

Comment on Facebook

Jane Donoghue it was a thriving town

I remember when South main street was full of small shops on both sides,starting from Billy Burkes on the left,(next to where JDs is now)right down to Friar St where we used to get fabulous ice cream at Fahys.For poor times all those shops thrived but died away slowly when the Supermarkets took over.I miss those days.

Town looked well then more freshly painted and shops

Wow. The condition of the shops top class. Even the clock gate looks like new. I wonder how they kept It clean back then. It must of been renovated some years before that. Times were so hard then. Looks like they’re a lot harder now in a different way. But I think everyone really looked after their own patch Back then,, no one afraid of hard work for sure.

I remember those days!

I remember those days!

I rember the calor gas sign!

Look at the Honda 50 on left of photo I bough one in 1966 from Laurence Foley in youghal as well good days

Any name for the man

Clockgate looks so clean

could go both ways ???

Good enough quality to be a postcard picture!

Two way traffic

View more comments

2 weeks ago
YoughalOnline.com

Sweet Youghal Bay, County Cork.
www.youghalonline.com/
... See MoreSee Less

Sweet Youghal Bay, County Cork.
https://www.youghalonline.com/

Comment on Facebook

Love this picture ❤️

Beautiful bay...I love to go there when I visit my relatives:)

What a great picture!! My mam was small live in youghal She love youghal

2 weeks ago
YoughalOnline.com

St. Patrick's Day - Youghal 2023 ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Catherine and Jim finlayson watching in spain ...well proud ..

Thank you youghalonline

Fantastic parade ☘️. Well done everyone

Happy St Patrick’s day from Alasdair and Catherine Bush in Glasgow 🇮🇪☘️💚

Sharon Tewkesbury watching in England. Happy st Patrick’s Day ☘️

Watching in drogheda ☘️☘️

Watching from London. ❤️

Hi Sharon watching in west London too, hi Youghal ☘️☘️

Absolute brilliant 🤩

Thanks for great day. Fab parade . We were delighted in the gold cortina ..x

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day From over the pond 🍀

Youghal4all thank you so much for a fantastic parade today ☘️🇮🇪 All for your hard work and time is truly appreciated 👍 ☘️

Such a fun day thanks to everyone involved

Well done to you all what a great turn out 🍀🍀🍀

Noel Power watching from La Coruña España.

great day thanks to everyone who organized the Parade

Lovely St Patrick's day parade. Watching from New Zealand. John Hislop

Well done to everyone fantastic 👏 👍.

Great craic - incredible support

Brilliant parade well done Youghal 👏👏

Excellent, Well done to All ☘️☘️

Great day ☘️

Happy St. Patrick's Day from Martin and Ginette Roche in Canada

Fantastic parade ☘☘

Great view from the Nook,sad to see no RDF force after over 50 years of taking part in the parade,,.🥹

View more comments

2 weeks ago
YoughalOnline.com

Happy St. Patrick's Day from YoughalOnline.com
www.youghalonline.com/
... See MoreSee Less

Happy St. Patricks Day from YoughalOnline.com
https://www.youghalonline.com/
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